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Christian Düben

Doctoral Candidate and Research Associate

Chair of Macroeconomics

Economics Department

Hamburg University

I am an economist conducting research in development economics, urban economics, regional economics, economic geography, economic history and related fields. The covered topics range from the shape of city size distributions to the origins of the Chinese urban landscape, the economics of African transport infrastructure investments and the link between seasonal iceberg drift, transatlantic cotton trade and regional inequality. All of these papers evolve around geo-spatial data and often bring me in touch with the literature of other, non-economic disciplines. I venture into remote sensing, geography, machine learning and sometimes spend weeks reading history books. My research feels like an adventure to me that allows me to explore whatever I am interested in, gather knowledge, come up with new questions and contribute to the literature.

After obtaining a master's degree in International Economics and Public Policy from the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and acquiring a strong background in applied microeconometrics I joined the Chair of Macroeconomics at Hamburg University in September 2017. Since then I have been working in close cooperation with my supervisor and coauthor Melanie Krause. My employment is tied to and funded by a research project called Shining (New) Light on Regional Inequality, Convergence and Development - a joint initiative of development economists from Brunswick, Hamburg and Hannover. Apart from the internal exchange among collaborators, our project organizes an annual Workshop on GeoData in Economics.

In connection with upcoming research projects I developed two RePEc-based web applications: CollEc and GraphEc. The former is an extension and a replacement of Thomas Krichel's CollEc RePEc service. The latter is a graphical interface to multiple RePEc services and yet to be publicly released. Over the next years, I intend to launch further programming projects within and beyond the statistical applications common in empirical economics. One example is a smartphone application collecting micro data on corruption.