A major benefit of trance is that it can deframe a person from rigid sets and thereby enable restructuring and reorganization of self-systems.

A major benefit of trance is that it can deframe a person from rigid sets and thereby enable restructuring and reorganization of self-systems. The assumption here is that conscious, goal-oriented activity typically involves taking on some mental set or frame that narrows or focuses attention to frame-relevant stimuli.

Trance experiences are not divorced from a person’s normal patterns of functioning ... they are not in any way bizarre or daydreaming. What is often different in trance is that the experiential involvement is intensified and extended for a longer duration for specific purposes.

That trance states operate in accord with a person’s normal processes means they are best developed through naturalistic communications. For example, rather than attempting to induce an age regression through some standardized and artificial-sounding communications as the experimental hypnotist does, the Ericksonian practitioner might ask the subject to revivify and describe an imaginary playmate or a pet, neighborhood, nursery rhyme, from childhood. That trance is naturalistic makes it an ideal context wherein a person can establish deep systemic changes by accessing, acknowledging, and then transforming basic experiential relationships.

-- Stephen G. Gilligan