About

Welcome to the Applied Evolutionary Epistemology Lab!

AppEEL aims to advance the study of the Extended Synthesis in biology from an inter- and transdisciplinary approach; and identify how the Extended Synthesis can be applied to the sociocultural and linguistic domains. We work from within an Applied Evolutionary Epistemological Approach.

Applied Evolutionary Epistemology is a scientific and philosophical methodology used to conduct evolutionary research. It combines the tenets of Evolutionary Epistemology with the research methodologies associated with Universalizing Evolutionary Theory. In regard to natural selection theory, Evolutionary Epistemologists, Philosophers of Biology and Evolutionary Biologists have engaged in abstracting universal heuristics or "skeletons" of the selection mechanism to enable the evolutionary study of sociocultural and linguistic phenomena; and they have engaged in contemplating the nature of units and levels of selection. Applied Evolutionary Epistemology combines both approaches and applies them to biological theories that are currently classified as belonging to an Extended Synthesis.

We want to develop universal heuristics of all known evolutionary mechanisms, identify the universal units whereupon and the levels whereat these evolutionary mechanisms are active, and investigate how these units and levels form nested hierarchies. Such a unified approach will enable us to better conceptualize and model biological and sociocultural evolution.

Research at AppEEL focuses on the following themes:

  1. The nature and scope of the Extended Synthesis;
  2. The implementation of the Extended Synthesis into the sociocultural and linguistic domain;
  3. Conceptualization of horizontal and vertical, micro- and macroevolution in biological and sociocultural sciences;
  4. Unification of the evolutionary sciences through the development of shared methodologies.

AppEEL is the home of the Springer Book Series Interdisciplinary Evolution Research.

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AppEEL was founded in July 2012 with the support of the John Templeton Foundation. We are part of the Center for Philosophy of Science of the Department for History and Philosophy of Science, at the Faculty of Science of the University of Lisbon. We are currently financed by the Portuguese Fund for Science and Technology.

Copyright AppEEL 2012