Courses in Other Departments

Below are courses at UCA (as of 10/2018) to consider to augment your graphic design emphasis or BA with a Minor. For your consideration. NOTE: items below are merely copied from the UCA.edu website; visit UCA.edu and the respective disciplines for more information.

[1] Courses in Public Relations (PRLS)

2305 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC RELATIONS Required foundation course for public relations majors and minors that provides an introduction to concepts, theories, and skills needed by public relations professionals. Covers the historical and social contexts, as well as current policy, legal, and ethical issues in the field.

3310 WRITING FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS Required course for public relations majors that emphasizes clear, concise strategic writing. Focuses on gathering information to write public relations materials that include fact sheets, news releases, feature articles, brochures, and email newsletters using Associated Press style. Prerequisites: JOUR 2300 and PRLS 2305. [UD UCA Core: D]

[1] Courses in Writing (WRTG)

3305 WRITING AS INFORMATION DESIGN Upper-division workshop course for writing majors and minors and students in other programs. Focuses on academic and professional forms of writing. Student will use advanced strategies for print and electronic writing and examine how to shape the composition process for specific writing tasks and purposes. Prerequisite: WRTG 1320.

3306 INFORMATION DESIGN II: USABILITY AND ACCESSIBILITY An advanced course in rhetorical approaches to writing for digital media. Students create multimodal digital texts and leave the course with portfolio items. The course takes students through the writing process from proposal development through the recursive global and local drafting and revision stages to the final reflective piece. Required for the Writing major and minor, Professional Writing track. Elective in the Writing major and the minor, General Writing track. Prerequisite: WRTG 3305.

[1] Courses in Marketing (MKTG)


2350 BASIC MARKETING An elective course not open to business majors. A required course for marketing minors and an elective course for management minors. Students earning a BBA degree will not be given credit for this class. Course is designed to provide the non-business major with an understanding of basic marketing concepts, terminology, technology, processes, and practical applications. The method of instruction includes lectures, discussion, videos, and practical applications of material.

2376 BUSINESS INNOVATION AND CREATIVE THINKING A required course in the Innovation and Entrepreneurship major, this course is designed to lead the student through the tasks that are required to successfully build a business around an innovation. More specifically, this course is designed to introduce students to the practices necessary to identify business problems and stimulate and manage the creativity and innovation process in a business. You will be given frameworks and methods for designing, developing, and implementing innovation in real work situations. The aim of the course is to provide you with the perspective and skill base necessary to manage innovation-focused projects, people, and ventures. The course will emphasize how innovation tools and methods can be successfully employed in real work situations. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

3350 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING A required course for all business majors in the business core. The course examines the role of marketing and marketing processes. The student will acquire an understanding of marketing concepts, terminology, associated technologies, practical applications, and how marketing relates to other business functions. The method of instruction includes lectures, discussion, and practical applications of material. Prerequisites: ACCT 2310, 2311 or CSCI 2320; ECON 2320, 2321; QMTH 2330.

3355 MARKETING AND NEW MEDIA:SOCIAL MEDIA AND EMERGING TRENDS This is an elective course in the Marketing Major and Minor. The course examines types of media that are relatively new for marketers including social media, social networks, blogs, podcasts, websites, guerilla marketing, branded entertainment, etc. This course will teach marketing students how to create and maintain a social media presence for business. Students will learn to use social media and content marketing to grow their business and engage with customers while examining emerging trends in non-traditional marketing media. Prerequisite: MKTG 2350 or 3350.

3356 FASHION MERCHANDISING AND E-COMMERCE An elective in the marketing major and minor. The course examines marketing fundamentals, retailing, and salesmanship as applied to the merchandising of fashion goods. Considerable emphasis on e-commerce, field trips, and guest lecturers. Class lecture and discussion are supplemented by students’ going to market and presenting research dealing with fashion to designers.

3360 FUNDAMENTALS OF STRATEGIC SELLING An elective course in the marketing major and minor. The course is offered to those students who want a deeper understanding of how personal selling and sales management relate to the other functional business areas. It examines strategic selling concepts and fundamental practices. The course explores terminology, associated technology (including information technology), and practical applications. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, workshops, and a semester project. Prerequisite: MKTG 2350, 3350, or consent of instructor.

3371 ADVERTISING An elective course in the marketing major and minor. Course examines advertising concepts, campaign strategy, media mix, advertising research, preparation of advertising copy, agency descriptions, and the relationship of advertising to the marketing mix. Uses a mix of lecture, discussion, and a required group project. Prerequisite: MKTG 2350 or 3350.

3373 PUBLIC RELATIONS An elective course in the marketing major and minor. Course surveys public relations strategies and tactics used as management tools and analyzes methods employed by profit and nonprofit organizations relating to stockholders, prospective investors, employees, communities, customers, and government agencies. Uses lecture, discussion, and a required group project. Prerequisite: MKTG 2350 or 3350.

3376 NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT This course serves as the second course in the idea generation sequence of the Innovation and Entrepreneurship program. It builds upon and expands the creative mind set, techniques, and collaborative processes acquired in the Business Innovation and Creative Thinking course. This course teaches and provides a complete hands-on experience of the total design process– consumer empathy and insights, problem framing and definition, development of options and ideas, prototypes, and iterations–that will result in a number of new products and services ideas. Prerequisites: MKTG 2376; Junior standing.

4353 MARKETING RESEARCH AND DATA MANAGEMENT A required course in the marketing major and an elective in the marketing minor. Course involves the application of research methodology to marketing and management problems. Includes research design, questionnaire construction, sample design, and quantitative data analysis. The goal of the course is to give students the tools either to perform marketing research projects or to interpret the output of such projects. The course involves lecture, discussion, several workshops, computer applications via SPSS, and a group project. Prerequisite: MKTG 3350.

4354 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR A required course in the marketing major and an elective in the marketing minor. Examines demographic, psychographic, and cultural forces that influence the behavior of customers. Includes internal and external forces and explains the consumer decision process. Uses lecture, discussion, and a required group project. Prerequisite: MKTG 2350 or 3350. 4355 MARKETING MANAGEMENT A required course in the marketing major and an elective in the management major. Focuses on applying marketing concepts to business cases and studying the managerial implications of product, pricing, distribution, promotion, and their relationships to customers and business environment. Uses lecture, discussion, and student group work/presentations. Prerequisites: MKTG 3350 plus 6 hours of marketing or consent of instructor. [UD UCA Core: C]

4360 HEALTH CARE MARKETING An elective in the marketing major and minor. Course uses applications of basic theoretical and practical marketing knowledge to the health care industry and gives students an exposure to contemporary health care marketing literature. The goal of the course is to orient students to the marketing and management of health care services. The format of the course includes lecture, discussion, presentations by health care practitioners, and an in-depth examination of health care marketing and management literature. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

4361 MARKETING PLANNING FOR HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONS An elective in the marketing major and minor. Examines the process of developing a health care marketing plan and has the goal of equipping students with the knowledge of how to construct a business marketing plan. Uses a combination of lecture, discussion, presentations by health care practitioners, case studies, and a group project, which involves writing a business marketing plan for a health care institution. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

4362 SERVICES MARKETING An elective course in the marketing major and minor and in the logistics and supply chain management major. The course involves the study of marketing in the context of service industries. Special attention will be placed on the unique characteristics of services, as opposed to products, and the importance of services in the US economy. Several of the major services industries (banking, airlines, health care, electronic brokerage) will be specifically examined. The goal of this class is to give students an in-depth knowledge of the services industry. Uses a combination of lecture, discussion, case studies, and a group project. Prerequisite: MKTG 2350 or 3350.

4370 FUNDAMENTALS OF DIRECT MARKETING An elective course in the marketing major and minor. The course provides an understanding of the strategies, tactics, processes, and technologies associated with direct marketing. Lectures, videos, and practical exercises are used in examining fundamental concepts, principles, business considerations, and associated practical applications. Prerequisite: MKTG 2350, MKTG 3350 or consent of instructor.

[1] Courses in Management Information Systems (MIS)

3301 COBOL I This course is one that may be taken to fulfill the programming requirement in the MIS major. Students learn COBOL programming through lab activities, programming clinics, and lectures. This course emphasizes programming logic and well-structured, modular, and informatively documented programs that produce well-formatted business reports. Program design is achieved through program plans, structure charts, and printer spacing charts.

3335 PROGRAMMING USING SCRIPTING LANGUAGES This course is one that may be taken to fulfill the programming requirement in the MIS major. This course is one of the basic programming courses offered. It introduces students to programming using scripting languages, a common approach in modern software development that interprets instructions (rather than complies) in a run-time environment. The course will be presented using a current scripting language, such as Python, Ruby, PHP, or JavaScript. Students will learn through lecture and lab components.

3339 PROGRAMMING IN JAVA I This course is one that may be taken to fulfill the programming requirement in the MIS major. In this course students examine the JAVA programming language. Lecture and discussion are supplemented through applications of software packages and student-written programs.

3362 PROGRAMMING IN VISUAL BASIC This course is one that may be taken to fulfill the programming requirement in the MIS major. This course uses event-driven and object-oriented programming techniques to design and code programs for graphical user interfaces. Fundamental programming concepts and system development issues are taught through the use of computer-based applications development.

3366 WEB SITE DEVELOPMENT This course is required for majors in the Web Development/ECommerce track and an elective option for majors in the other tracks. The course is intended for students interested in learning about web page design concepts, web server support, and FTP techniques. The instructor assumes knowledge of Windows and the Internet and introduces students to the development of web pages using HTML and other web design enhancing tools (such as JavaScript, DHTML, CSS, XML, etc.) through lecture, demonstration, and practice in a networked computer lab. Prerequisite: Knowledge of Windows and the Internet.

4366 E-COMMERCE AND ADVANCED WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT This course is required for MIS majors in the Web Development/E-Commerce track and an elective option for majors in the Programmer/Analyst track and minors. The course provides students the opportunity to go beyond the basics of HTML, JavaScript, and XML, by learning tools and techniques useful in Web design and development for Intranets, Extranets and the Internet, with attention to E-Commerce. The course is designed to help meet the needs of those students who hope to become Website designers, developers or managers. The course content should help students integrate materials and learning experiences from prerequisite courses to develop Web design and development skills valuable in the private or public sector. Prerequisite: C or better in MIS 3366.

[1] Courses in Journalism (JOUR)

1121 PRINT MEDIA APPLICATIONS [see also JOUR 2121, 3121, 4121] A required course for online and print journalism majors and minors. The course provides laboratory practice and experience in producing the student newspaper, yearbook, or an online publication. Each level may be repeated for a total of 2 hours each; these courses must be taken in order. Production.

1123 ELECTRONIC MEDIA APPLICATIONS [ see see also JOUR 2123, 3123, 4123] A required course for broadcast and online journalism majors and minors. The course provides practical experience working on the student television station or an online publication. Each level may be repeated for a total of 2 credit hours each; these courses must be taken in order. Production.

2121 PRINT MEDIA APPLICATIONS [see also JOUR 1121, 3121, 4121] A required course for online and print journalism majors and minors. The course provides laboratory practice and experience in producing the student newspaper, yearbook, or an online publication. Each level may be repeated for a total of 2 hours each; these courses must be taken in order. Production.

2123 ELECTRONIC MEDIA APPLICATIONS [ see see also JOUR 1123, 3123, 4123] A required course for broadcast and online journalism majors and minors. The course provides practical experience working on the student television station or an online publication. Each level may be repeated for a total of 2 credit hours each; these courses must be taken in order. Production.

2305 BASIC PRESS PHOTOGRAPHY A required course for all journalism majors and an elective course for minors. Beginning course in theories and applications of photojournalism. Includes the study of basic digital and Adobe Photoshop photographic techniques. Students learn the legal aspects of photojournalism, including libel, privacy, and copyright law. Students must use an adjustable 35 mm or larger digital SLR camera. Lecture/Production. Prerequisite: JOUR 2300.

2325 PRINCIPLES OF ONLINE JOURNALISM A required course for all journalism majors and an elective course for minors. The course introduces the theories and practices of reporting for online news sources. Students in this course learn to produce news stories and present them online. Prerequisite: JOUR 2300

2340 BROADCAST JOURNALISM PRODUCTION I A required course for journalism majors and an elective course for minors. An introduction to the techniques of broadcast journalism newswriting, production, terminology, and operation of digital video cameras, lenses, lighting, audio recording, and non-linear digital editing equipment; and an exploration of the relevant aesthetics and practices of broadcast journalism production. Prerequisite: JOUR 2300.

3121 PRINT MEDIA APPLICATIONS [see also JOUR 1121, 2121, 4121] A required course for online and print journalism majors and minors. The course provides laboratory practice and experience in producing the student newspaper, yearbook, or an online publication. Each level may be repeated for a total of 2 hours each; these courses must be taken in order. Production.

3123 ELECTRONIC MEDIA APPLICATIONS [ see see also JOUR 1123, 2123, 4123] A required course for broadcast and online journalism majors and minors. The course provides practical experience working on the student television station or an online publication. Each level may be repeated for a total of 2 credit hours each; these courses must be taken in order. Production.

3305 PUBLICATION DESIGN AND MAKEUP A required course for print journalism and public relations majors and an elective course for other journalism majors and minors. Beginning course in using desktop publishing software and related hardware to achieve electronic pagination. Emphasis on newspaper, newsletter, magazine, and brochure production. Lecture/Production. Prerequisite: JOUR 2300.

3311 DIGITAL IMAGING An elective course for all journalism majors and minors. The course examines the use of current computer software for preparation, enhancement, and manipulation of photographs and for the creation of graphics for publication and illustration purposes in print, broadcast, and online media. Prerequisite: JOUR 2305 or consent of instructor.

3345 ONLINE PUBLISHING I A required course for online journalism majors and an elective course for other journalism majors and minors. The course focuses on the technical skills required in online journalism. It provides the fundamentals of internet design and usability, creating functional websites, and producing and editing multimedia. Lecture/Production. Prerequisite: JOUR 2325.

3346 ONLINE PUBLISHING II A required course for online journalism majors and an elective course for other journalism majors and minors. This course provides a real-time platform to produce and publish online journalism. Prerequisite: JOUR 3345.

3363 AUDIO JOURNALISM An elective course for journalism majors and minors. Provides in-depth study and practice of advanced audio production techniques for video, film, dramatic presentations, music, and multimedia. Lecture/Production. Prerequisite: JOUR 2340.

3373 NEWS DOCUMENTARY AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS PRODUCTION An elective for journalism majors and minors. This course is designed to help journalism students shoot and edit short documentary videos incorporating accuracy, fairness, and objectivity in news reporting. The course stresses identification of research topics, as well as preproduction structuring of the projects and production values. Lecture. Prerequisite: JOUR 3374 or consent of instructor.

3374 BROADCAST JOURNALISM PRODUCTION II A required course for broadcast journalism majors and an elective for other journalism majors and minors. This course emphasizes techniques of studio production, industry terminology, and the operation of television studio equipment. Students will gain a practical understanding of cameras, lenses, video switchers, audio mixing boards, lighting instruments, and graphics. Production. Prerequisite: JOUR 2340 or consent of instructor.

4121 PRINT MEDIA APPLICATIONS [see also JOUR 1121, 2121, 3121] A required course for online and print journalism majors and minors. The course provides laboratory practice and experience in producing the student newspaper, yearbook, or an online publication. Each level may be repeated for a total of 2 hours each; these courses must be taken in order. Production.

4123 ELECTRONIC MEDIA APPLICATIONS [ see see also JOUR 1123, 2123, 3123] A required course for broadcast and online journalism majors and minors. The course provides practical experience working on the student television station or an online publication. Each level may be repeated for a total of 2 credit hours each; these courses must be taken in order. Production.

4313 WRITING FOR ELECTRONIC MEDIA An elective course for journalism majors and minors. Seminar in writing broadcast news copy. Lecture/Production. Prerequisite: JOUR 2300.

4315 BROADCAST JOURNALISM PRODUCTION III A required course for broadcast journalism majors and an elective course for other journalism majors and minors. Students will develop proficiency in advanced broadcast news reporting and production for News6. Production. Prerequisite: JOUR 3374 or consent of instructor.

[1] Courses in Film (FILM)

1305 INTRODUCTION TO FILM A required course for majors in digital filmmaking and a prerequisite for all Digital Filmmaking courses. The course introduces students to basic concepts of cinematic form and genre; stylistic techniques of mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound; and aesthetic consideration of form, genre, and style. Lectures, readings, and screenings. Prerequisite: None.

1310 INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL STORYTELLING A required course for majors and minors in digital filmmaking. The course introduces students to filmmaking fundamentals of visual storytelling, storyboarding, visual design, and best practices using digital filmmaking technology. Lecture. Prerequisite: FILM 1305.

2300 FILM APPRECIATION General education curriculum option for the fine arts requirement. Promotes understanding and appreciation of the art of cinema through study of film style, film history, film genres, and the cultural impact of films. Examines both the theory and practice of filmmaking. Lectures, readings, screenings.

2466 DIGITAL FILMMAKING 1 A required course for digital filmmaking majors. Techniques of digital video production, terminology, and operation of digital video cameras, lenses, lighting, audio recording, and digital editing. Production. Prerequisites: FILM 1310 and 2310.

3315 CLASSICAL FILM THEORY A required course for majors in digital filmmaking. A survey of the literature and films associated with what is now considered the classical era of film theory (1916-1958). The course will consider the questions early film theorists asked about the (then) new art form as well as what they offered as answers to their questions. Lectures, readings, discussions, and screenings. Prerequisites: FILM 1305. [UD UCA Core: I, R]

3316 FILM THEORY SINCE 1960 An elective for majors in digital filmmaking. The course is a historical account of theoretical writings about film from the mid-twentieth century to the present, including semiotic, psychoanalytic, Marxist, feminist, and cognitive theories of film. Lectures, readings, discussions, and screenings. Prerequisites: FILM 1305.

3350 CINEMA HISTORY 1 A required course for majors in digital filmmaking. History of the motion picture in the silent and early sound era. The events are presented chronologically with screenings of representative films from each decade. The course is international in scope with attention paid to major contributions to cinema from several countries. Topics discussed include the origin of the movies, the acquisition of sound and color, the development of the studio system, as well as trends, movements, and influences. Lectures, readings, discussions and screenings. Prerequisites: FILM 1305.

3351 CINEMA HISTORY 2 A required course for majors in digital filmmaking. History of the motion picture in the contemporary era. Relevant events of this period are presented chronologically with screenings of representative films from each decade. The course is international in scope with attention paid to major contributions to cinema from several countries. Topics discussed include changes in the national studio systems and the role of independent producers, as well as trends, movements, and influences. Lectures, readings, discussions, and screenings. Prerequisites: FILM 1305 and FILM 3350. [UD UCA Core: D]

3456 DIGITAL FILMMAKING 2 A required course for majors in digital filmmaking. The course provides students with higher-level aspects of the digital filmmaking process from both technical and narrative points of view. Specific skills learned include computer aided pre-production, exposure control, shot design, three-point lighting technique, digital audio recording, and professional level non-linear picture and sound editing. The focus throughout will be on the use of these skills in narrative story construction. Production. Prerequisites: FILM 2310, FILM 2466, completion of 60 credit hours.

4311 CINEMATOGRAPHY An elective course for Digital Filmmaking majors and minors. This course expands students’ understanding of visual storytelling through cinematography. Topics include creative approaches to composition, lighting techniques, digital cinema workflows and color grading. Prerequisite: FILM 2466.

4320 FILM EDITING This is a project-oriented elective course in non-linear film editing, with an emphasis on classical, continuity editing as a storytelling device. Topics include history, aesthetics, techniques, and technical aspects of editing. Lecture. Prerequisite: FILM 2466.

4354 ANIMATION FOR VISUAL EFFECTS An elective course for Digital Filmmaking majors and minors. This course introduces the student to the art and science of 3D computer animation for prerendered and real-time applications. Topics covered include an introduction to planning, modeling, surfacing, lighting, animation, physical simulation, rendering, and compositing 3D renderings for use in film visual effects. Prerequisite: FILM 2466. Lecture.

4355 VISUAL EFFECTS COMPOSITING An elective course for Digital Filmmaking majors and minors. This course introduces the student to the art and science of visual effects compositing for digital filmmaking. Topics covered include the visual effects workflow, video and imaging technology, image processing, matte creation, tracking, re-timing, 2D animation, and 2.5D virtual scenery. Lecture. Prerequisite: FILM 2466

4356 DIGITAL FILMMAKING 3 A required course for majors in digital filmmaking. The course provides students with advanced instruction in narrative construction, production pre-visualization, production planning, and production management. Primarily through project participation and execution, students will learn the procedures and skills necessary to collaborate on the planning and management of a digital film production. Prerequisites: FILM 2466 and FILM 3456. [UD UCA Core: C]

4357 DIGITAL FILMMAKING 4 A required course for majors in digital filmmaking. The course provides students with advanced instruction in film production, editing, sound design, color correction, marketing and promotion, and film financing. Primarily through project participation and execution, students will learn the procedures and skills necessary to collaborate on the filming, post-production, and marketing of a digital film production. Prerequisite: FILM 4356. [UD UCA Core: Z]

4363 AUDIO PRODUCTION AND DESIGN FOR FILM An elective course for Digital Filmmaking majors and minors. This is a course using audio to support digital filmmaking and storytelling. Students will study and implement the elements of sound design to create full soundtracks for film projects. Students will also learn to record and mix production audio using different types of microphones and recording equipment. Lectures, discussion, practical exercises. Prerequisite: FILM 2466.

[1] Courses in Creative Writing (CRWR)

2310 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING This course introduces students to several core components of successful creative expression and allows students to practice them through composing original, imaginative work in poetry, prose, and other genres depending on the instructor’s expertise. Class time will be devoted to workshops, invention exercises, and the discussion of guided reading assignments. The course is required for both creative writing and writing majors and minors. Lecture, discussion. [ACTS: ENGL2013]

3325 FORMS OF POETRY Comprehensive examination of the formal elements of the literary art of writing poetry, with an emphasis on the study of prosody, traditional and contemporary poetics, poetic craft, and other technical aspects of the art. The course is taught with a workshop component. Lecture, discussion. Prerequisite: CRWR 2310.

3330 FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION This course will provide an in-depth consideration of, and practice in, several of the many forms of creative nonfiction writing. These forms may include memoir, profile, essays about place and journeys, and lyrical and meditative essays, among others. Forms will be determined by instructor interest and expertise. The course will have a workshop component. Lecture, discussion. Prerequisite: CRWR 2310.

3331 FORMS OF ILLUSTRATED NARRATIVE This course is an upper-division workshop course that provides students with a comprehensive overview of the formal elements of illustrated and interactive narratives with an emphasis on the study of comic art, collage, computer-generated projects, literary works accompanied by visual art or photography, gaming storylines, installations, and other forms of illustrated/interactive narratives. Students will practice different forms and submit a portfolio of original work at the end of the course. Students will also study many established writers and artists in the genre as models, as well as examine critical articles on illustrated narrative design and theory, but most class time will be devoted to examining students’ works-in-progress. Some class time will be devoted to peer review and discussion, invention exercises, and marketing strategies. This course has a workshop component. Lecture, discussion. Prerequisite: CRWR 2310.

3335 FORMS OF FICTION This course will provide an in-depth consideration and practice of one of the many forms of fiction writing, which may include, flash fiction, magical realism, mystery writing, science fiction, and metafiction. Subjects will be determined by instructor interest and expertise. This course has a workshop component. Lecture, discussion. Prerequisite: CRWR 2310.

3370 POETRY WORKSHOP An upper-division workshop course focusing on the writing of original poetry. Students will present drafts of work for peer review and discussion and will submit a portfolio of original material at the end of the course. Some class time will be devoted to readings, invention exercises, and marketing strategies. Prerequisites: CRWR 2310 and CRWR 3325.

3371 FICTION WORKSHOP An upper-division workshop course focusing on the writing of original fiction. Students will present drafts of original work for peer review and discussion and will submit a portfolio of original material at the end of the course. Some class time will be devoted to readings, invention exercises, and marketing strategies. Prerequisites: CRWR 2310 and CRWR 3335.

3372 CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP An upper-division workshop course focusing on the writing of original creative nonfiction. Students will present drafts of original work for peer review and discussion and will submit a portfolio of original material at the end of the course. Some class time will be devoted to readings, invention exercises, and marketing strategies. Prerequisites: CRWR 2310 and CRWR 3330.

3373 ILLUSTRATED NARRATIVE WORKSHOP An upper-division elective workshop course focusing on the writing of original illustrated and/or interactive narratives. Students will present drafts of work for peer review and discussion and will submit a portfolio or original material at the end of the course. Some class time will be devoted to readings, invention exercises, and marketing strategies. Prerequisites: CRWR 2310 and CRWR 3331.

[1] Courses in Communication (SPCH)

1300 PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNICATION Study, application, and evaluation of principles of organization, evidence, reasoning, critical thinking, verbal and nonverbal behavior, interpersonal communication, public speaking, and small group interaction in the oral communication setting. The emphasis will be on meeting the individual needs of students through individualized instruction using communication experiences. [ACTS: SPCH1003]

1305 COMMUNICATION, CULTURE, AND THE ARTS This first-year seminar explores how communication constructs social, political, religious, educational, and civic dimensions of our culture. Through an understanding of communication theories, and by applying a variety of methods of communication criticism to artistic creations, students will come to understand how the arts exert powerful influences that shape our worldviews and our society. Participation at varied campus and area arts events as audience members provides students with examples and activities illustrating course content and developing an appreciation of the persuasive dimensions of the arts.

1306 COMMUNICATION AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT This first-year seminar surveys a variety of communicative approaches needed to participate effectively in civic culture, including political, organizational, and community contexts. Emphasizes the fundamental place public communication has in a democracy through group deliberation, public speaking, questioning and responding, petitioning, and letter writing. Provides students opportunities to meet with local civic leaders and to find engagement opportunities on campus and in the surrounding community. 1310 PUBLIC SPEAKING An introduction to effective presentational speaking in informative, persuasive, and special occasion contexts.

2308 PERSPECTIVES IN COMMUNICATION A required course that examines the many perspectives from which communication may be studied. This course serves as an introduction to the discipline of communication. Prerequisite: COMM 1300.

3103 COMMUNICATION APPLICATIONS Elective course that provides practical experience in communication (e.g., forensics, case studies, event design, portfolio creation, public communication lab, etc.). May be repeated (up to three total hours for minors; up to six total hours for majors). Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

3301 ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION Explores communication within organizations, how this communication affects individuals, and the communication between organizations and their stakeholders using an applied theoretical framework and a focus on ethics. Prerequisite: COMM 2308 or consent of the instructor. [UD UCA Core: C, R]

3303 GENDER COMMUNICATION Elective course that explores theoretical perspectives and practical applications regarding gender as examined through the intersection of culture and communication. Prerequisite: COMM 2308 or consent of instructor.

3307 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION Elective course that investigates major theories and research about communicating with others. Focuses on choices and consequences in communication. Students will develop and improve interpersonal skills as applied to their personal and professional lives. Prerequisite: COMM 2308 or consent of instructor. [UD UCA Core: D]

3310 ADVANCED PUBLIC SPEAKING An applied course focused on the process of developing effective public presentations. Includes analysis of subjects, selection and arrangement of supporting materials, audience adaptation, and advanced delivery. Familiarizes students with academic, organizational, civic, and ceremonial presentations. Prerequisite: COMM 1300.

3312 PERSUASION Surveys recent research on and techniques of persuasion in rhetoric, social psychology, advertising, public opinion, and evidence in relation to attitude change. Prerequisite: COMM 2308 or consent of instructor.

3330 EVENT PLANNING Elective course that familiarizes students with key conceptual, communicative, and practical components of the event-planning profession. Students plan and implement a special event applying the five phases of event management: research, design, planning, coordination, and evaluation. Prerequisite: COMM 1300.

4316 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION Elective course that provides opportunities to study specific topics in communication. Students who have completed basic and intermediate courses may study specific topics that are not regularly offered in the curriculum. Prerequisite: COMM 2308 or consent of instructor.

4320 NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION Elective course that surveys the history of nonverbal communication research, contemporary research methods in nonverbal communication, diverse nonverbal codes (space, touch, eye gaze, etc.), and the ways nonverbal communication functions in our personal and public lives. Prerequisites: COMM 2308 and 2313, or consent of instructor.