Yielding versus depinning in disordered systems

A workshop in Paris, October 22-24, 2018

Organisers: Elisabeth Agoritsas and Francesco Zamponi

Speakers:
  • Misaki Ozawa (Université de Montpellier)
  • Alberto Rosso (Université Paris-Saclay)
  • Sri Sastry (Jawaharlal Center Bangalore)
  • Damien Vandembroucq (ESPCI Paris)
  • Anaël Lemaître (Laboratoire NAVIER, Université Paris-Est)
  • Stefano Zapperi (Università di Milano)

This workshop will be focused on the analogy between the yielding transition of amorphous materials under load and the depinning transition of elastic objects driven in a quenched disordered landscape. Related topics such as plasticity, avalanches, and jamming will be discussed.

Note the two different locations: ENS Paris, 24 Rue Lhomond (Monday and Wednesday), and Collège des Irlandais, 5 Rue des Irlandais, Paris (Tuesday)

Program:
Monday 22 (ENS Paris, Room E244 aka Conf IV, 2nd floor)
10:30 Free coffee and free discussion
12:30 Lunch
14:00 Stefano Zapperi (discussant: Gilles Tarjus)
15:30 Coffee Break
16:00 Damien Vandembroucq (discussant: Vivien Lecomte)
Tuesday 23 (Collège des Irlandais, salle Michel Guillaume)
9:30 Breakfast and free discussion
10:30 Misaki Ozawa (discussant: Sylvain Patinet)
12:00 Lunch
14:00 Alberto Rosso (discussant: Itamar Procaccia)
15:30 Coffee Break
16:00 Anaël Lemaître (discussant: Lisa Manning)
Wednesday 24 (ENS Paris, Room E244 aka Conf IV, 2nd floor)
9:30 Breakfast and free discussion
10:00 Sri Sastry (discussant: Michael Falk)
11:30 Round table and wrap up
13:00 Lunch
14:00 Free discussion
16:00 End of the meeting


Practical information:
There are no registration fees, however registration is mandatory before Sept. 15, for organisational reasons. In order to register, please write an email entitled  "Workshop Y&D" to elisabeth.agoritsas AT lpt.ens.fr, indicating your name and affiliations. 

This workshop is supported by the Simons Collaboration on Cracking the Glass Problem

Simons Collaborations, made possible by support from the Simons Foundation, bring together groups of outstanding scientists to address mathematical or theoretical topics of fundamental scientific importance in which a significant new development has created a novel area for exploration or provided a new direction for progress in an established field.