Employment and Work

WHAT’S AT STAKE

The dynamism of the American workforce is our country’s greatest renewable natural resource. Jump-starting economic growth therefore requires that American workers have the skills that are needed to unleash their potential. One of the troubling features of the American economy today is the mismatch between the skill set of the American workforce and the requirements of the employment market. The gap between the two lies at the heart of our jobs crisis.

Over two centuries American workers have repeatedly proven themselves to be the most productive and the most capable at adapting themselves to changing economic conditions and embracing new technologies that come on stream. During that time, the American economy has also been the beneficiary of the extraordinary contributions made by the best and the brightest from around the world who have chosen to make our country their new home. This combination has propelled the American economy to heights envied across the world. It can do so again.

OBAMA’S FAILURE

President Obama’s approach to human capital is, here as elsewhere, to let government take the lead. The federal government has been pouring money into retraining programs. In fiscal year 2009, the sum total was $18 billion for 47 separate employment and job training programs administered by nine different federal agencies. Seven of the 47 programs account for three-fourths of the spending, but all except 3 of the 47 programs overlap with at least one other program.

Only 5 of the 47 programs have had their results thoroughly evaluated since 2004. According to the General Accounting Office (GAO), “little is known about the effectiveness of most programs.” It also turns out that the little we do know has not been particularly heartening. A 2008 study found that one of the five, the Workforce Investment Act Adult and Dislocated Workers program, produced only “small to nonexistent” results.

This is the kind of government waste, political horse-trading, and administrative chaos that has brought discredit on the federal government. We cannot afford to squander taxpayer money in this way. President Obama’s job retraining record is a live, ongoing demonstration of why federal spending in so many areas needs to be scaled back.

MITT’S PLAN

Mitt Romney sees two important objectives that America can pursue immediately to build on the extraordinary traditional strengths of its workforce. The first is to retrain American workers to ensure that they have the education and skills to match the jobs of today’s economy. The second is to attract the best and the brightest from around the world.

Retraining Workers

Mitt Romney will approach retraining policy with a conservative mindset that recognizes it as an area where the federal government is particularly ill-equipped to succeed. Retraining efforts must be founded upon a partnership that brings together the states and the private sector. The sprawling federal network of redundant bureaucracies should be dismantled and the funds used for better purposes. One particularly promising approach that Romney supports and believes states should be encouraged to pursue is a system of Personal Reemployment Accounts for unemployed individuals. These accounts would facilitate programs that place individuals directly into companies that provide on-the-job training—as governor of Massachusetts, Romney helped create just such a program.

  •   • Eliminate redundancy in federal retraining programs by consolidating programs and funding streams, centering as much activity as possible in a single agency
  •   • Give states authority to manage retraining programs by block granting federal funds
  •   • Facilitate the creation of Personal Reemployment Accounts
  •   • Encourage greater private sector involvement in retraining programs

Attracting the Best and the Brightest

To ensure that America continues to lead the world in innovation and economic dynamism, a Romney administration would press for an immigration policy designed to maximize America’s economic potential. The United States needs to attract and retain job creators from wherever they come. Foreign-born residents with advanced degrees start companies, create jobs, and drive innovation at an especially high rate. While lawful immigrants comprise about 8 percent of the population, immigrants start 16 percent of our top-performing, high-technology companies, hold the position of CEO or lead engineer in 25 percent of high-tech firms, and produce over 25 percent of all patent applications filed from the United States.

  •   • Raise visa caps for highly skilled workers
  •   • Grant permanent residency to eligible graduates with advanced degrees in math, science, and engineering

JOB CREATION

The United States is mired in the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, with more than 20 million Americans who are unemployed, underemployed, or who have stopped looking for work. President Obama has neglected the fundamental tasks of creating jobs and growing our economy. Instead, he’s focused his efforts on an anti-jobs, anti-growth agenda that has significantly expanded the role of the federal government. His actions have only succeeded in creating more of the uncertainty and obstacles to investment that threaten the economic vitality of our nation.

Mitt Romney has the experience and know-how to create jobs and help businesses grow. He spent over twenty-five years in the private sector, building businesses and creating jobs. Elected Governor of Massachusetts during an economic slump, Mitt Romney fought hard to make his state job-friendly and business competitive.

Over the course of this campaign, Mitt will lay out a detailed plan for what he will do as President to jump-start economic growth and help create jobs. His plan will be based on the following principles:

POLICY

SMALLER GOVERNMENT

Reverse President Obama’s massive expansion of federal power

We must cut federal spending to free up resources for productive investment, and curtail ever-expanding federal authority to provide businesses with the certainty and stability they need to make those investments. As President, Mitt Romney will place a hard cap on federal spending, forcing Washington politicians to control the size and growth of government.

ECONOMIC COMPETITIVENESS

Make America the most attractive place in the world to do business 

Today, more than ever, new businesses can choose where to form and existing ones can choose where to invest and hire. America has long been the most dynamic economy in the world, and we must not let our government change that. As President, Mitt Romney will:

  • Lower taxes on businesses to keep America competitive in the global economy
  • Slash bureaucratic red tape and place a hard cap on the impact that federal regulations can have on the economy
  • Limit the corrosive influence of union bosses on productive businesses

FREE TRADE ON FAIR TERMS

Open markets on fair terms for our products and services around the world

Access to foreign markets is crucial to growing our economy. We must reassert American leadership in international negotiations, follow through on commitments we have already made, and push aggressively for advantageous new agreements.

ENERGY SECURITY AND INDEPENDENCE

Meet the challenge of achieving a secure and affordable supply of fuels

We need to lower the amount of energy we use and increase the supply of domestic energy sources. Government must be a partner, not an obstacle, in this effort. As President, Mitt Romney will facilitate the exploration and development of conventional fossil fuels, remove the regulatory hurdles that prevent the construction of nuclear power plants, and address market failures that prevent the adoption of new technologies.

TRAINING AND PREPARING AMERICA’S WORKERS

Prepare the American workforce to succeed in a 21st-century economy

Our economy is rapidly changing. Some of the steps we must take to restart economic growth—for instance, expanding trade relationships and developing new sources of energy—will only hasten that evolution. We need to eliminate ineffective government handouts, and instead give workers the resources and responsibility to develop valuable skills and make the transition to new types of work.

Resume Pointers

  1. Resume Format
    1. You should save your Resume in plain text.
      1. Plain text may be easier to copy and paste into job sites.
      2. Some people don't want to see fancy formating, but just want your plain text resume e-mailed to them.
    2. You need multiple versions of your resume.
      1. Some employers will ask to see how much you made at each job.
      2. Some employers will want to see the name of your boss at each job
      3. Sometimes you will want to include references, and some times you won't
  2. Resume Sections
      1. Resume Sections: Contact Information
        1. Address
          1. You should put your address on a Resume.
            1. Reasons to agree:
              1. If you don't put your address, someone might assume you are from out of town, and might not waist their time on you.
            2. Reasons to disagree:
              1. If you put your address, and you are from out of town, someone might think you are unwilling to relocate.
      2. Resume Sections: Competencies 
        1. Such as Business Development, or Sales
      3. Resume Sections: Education
        1. Leaving off college beginning dates can lead an employer to think it took you a long time to graduate.
          1. Reasons to disagree:
            1. So what? Who cares how long it took to graduate. Bill Gates didn't graduate. Taking a break from college to have a family should not be a negative. You can drive yourself crazy coming up with all these stupid rules of what to do about your resume. If you think it looks bad to show your start and end dates you can leave them off, and if someone asks you why, you can put tell them the story.
        2. You should not abbreviate you school name.
          1. Reasons to agree:
            1. It looks lazy.
            2. Their are many BSUs: Ball State, Boise State, Bemidji State University, etc
          2. Reasons to disagree:
            1. Brigham Young might have negative connotations to a southern baptist recruiter. Maybe you should just leave it BYU.
      4. Resume Sections: Objective
      5. Resume Sections: Personal Profile
    1. Formating Options
      1. Chronological
        1. You should have both a chronological resume and non chronological resume.
  1. Resume Length
    1. A Resume should be one page.
      1. Reasons to disagree:
        1. Like all blanket statements, this is stupid.
        2. If you have headings, people will be able to they are looking for on your Resume.
        3. This may be true, if you are printing your resume, but if your Resume is on a Database, it may be looking for key words. The more words on your Resume, the more likely it is to get hit with a key word
    2. You should devote the most amount of time to your most recent job.
    3. You should devote the most amount of time to your most relevant job.
    4. You should devote the most amount of time to your highest paying job.
    5. A Resume should be like a good dress: long enough to cover the essentials but short enough to keep it interesting.
  2. Time Spent on Your Resume
    1. You should work on your Resume before you loose your job.
      1. Reasons to agree:
        1. It is depressing to do anything after you loose a job.
        2. Working on your Resume periodically helps you re-asses your career.
      2. Reasons to disagree:
        1. You will have more time to work on it after you loose your job.
        2. If you work on your resume online, your employer could find out, and you could get in trouble.
    2. You should work on your Resume before you start to look for a job.
      1. Reasons to agree:
        1. You don't want a potential employer to have a bad first impression of you by seeing a less impressive Resume.
    3. If you work on your resume online, your employer could find out, and you could get in trouble.
      1. Reasons to disagree:
        1. It is easy to make an online Resume private, so that no one can find it.
  3. General
    1. You should not exaggerate on your resume.  
    2. You should make your Resume look professional.

Cover Letter Pointers

  1. There is no such thing as a perfect cover letter
    1. Plain text may be easier to copy and paste into job sites.
    2. Some people don't want to see fancy formating, but just want your plain text resume e-mailed to them.
    3. There is no accounting for taste, and it is difficult to predict what type of person will be reviewing your Cover letter.
  2. It is hard to know what to put on your cover letter that is different than your Resume
    1. Reasons to disagree:
      1. You should not just repeat your resume, in a conversational tone for those who don't like to look at lists.
      2. You could use your Resume as a way of explaining gaps in employment, or other problems people might see from looking at your resume.
      3. There is no such thing as a perfect cover letter.
  3. Your cover letter should be short.
  4. Your cover letter should make the interviewer want to know more.
  5. Your cover letter should address your career goals
  6. Your cover letter should address experience.
  7. It is hard to know what to put on your cover letter that is different than your Resume.
    1. Reasons to disagree:
      1. You should not just repeat your resume, in a conversational tone for those who don't like to look at lists.
      2. You could use your Resume as a way of explaining gaps in employment, or other problems people might see from looking at your resume.
      3. There is no such thing as a perfect cover letter.
Do you know someone who is looking for a job? With the economy like it is, most of us do. This website is place for them and you to explore all aspects of the job searching experience.

Do you want to post reasons to disagree with really bad advice you have been given? 

With this website we can:
  1. Post Jobs we see in the Chicago area.
  2. Post pointers and tips
  3. Post Resumes?
Things religious groups should do to help people find jobs
  1. Get people who are willing to review resume's together with Resume's that need reviewing.


Bollingbrook, IL

309 Quadrangle Drive, Bolingbrook, IL
‎ - (630) 378-0200

 Security Bureau
321 Quadrangle Drive, Bolingbrook, IL
‎ - (630) 759-0647

281 South Bolingbrook Drive, Bolingbrook, IL
‎ -(630) 226-1450‎ 

479 Quadrangle Drive, Bolingbrook, IL
‎ - (630) 771-7711

180 North Bolingbrook Drive, Bolingbrook, IL
‎ -(630) 972-0828

400 Quadrangle Drive, Bolingbrook, IL
‎ - (630) 759-5200

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‎ - (630) 679-5900

215 Remington Boulevard, Bolingbrook, IL
‎ -(630) 226-1691‎ 

368 Commons Drive, Bolingbrook, IL
‎ - (630) 739-9100

384 Commons Drive, Bolingbrook, IL
‎ - (630) 972-9370

For more just  this into Google: "employment loc: Bolingbrook, IL"

Woodridge, Illinois | 4 miles northeast | 34130 people 
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Chicago Resumes

Accounting & Finance 
Advertising & Public Relations
Aerospace & Aviation
Arts & Entertainment & Publishing
Automotive 
Banking & Mortgage
Business Development
Business Opportunity 
Clerical & Administrative 
Construction & Facilities 
Consumer Goods 
Customer Service 
Education & Training 
Energy & Utilities 
Engineering 
Government & Military 
Green 
Healthcare 
Hospitality & Travel 
Human Resources 
Installation & Maintenance 
Insurance 
Internet 
Job Search Aids 
Law Enforcement & Security 
Legal 
Management & Executive 
Manufacturing & Operations 
Marketing 
Non-Profit & Volunteer 
Pharmaceutical & Biotech 
Professional Services 
QA & Quality Control 
Real Estate 
Restaurant & Food Service 
Retail 
Sales 
Science & Research 
Skilled Labor 
Technology 
Telecommunications 
Transportation & Logistics

Administration 
Cleaning 
Clerical 
College 
Data Entry 
Delivery 
Driver 
Industrial 
Maintenance 
Supervisor 
Warehouse

Caregiver 
Cashier 
Child Care 
Counselor 
Economic Recovery 
Housekeeper 
Janitor 
Merchandiser 
Nanny 
Packer 
Painter 
Receptionist 
Social Worker 
Store Manager


How to Help a Friend find a Job



  1. Resume Format
    1. You should save your Resume in plain text.
    2. You need multiple versions of your resume
    3. Resume Sections
      1. Resume Sections: Contact Information
        1. Address
          1. You should put your address on a Resume.
      2. Resume Sections: Competencies 
        1. Such as Business Development, or Sales
      3. Resume Sections: Education
        1. Leaving off college beginning dates can lead an employer to think it took you a long time to graduate.
        2. You should not abbreviate you school name.
      4. Resume Sections: Objective
      5. Resume Sections: Personal Profile
    4. Formating Options
      1. Chronological
        1. You should have both a chronological resume and non chronological resume.
  2. Resume Length
    1. A Resume should be one page.
    2. You should devote the most amount of time to your most recent job.
    3. You should devote the most amount of time to your most relevant job.
    4. You should devote the most amount of time to your highest paying job.
    5. A Resume should be like a good dress: long enough to cover the essentials but short enough to keep it interesting.
  3. Time Spent on Your Resume
    1. You should work on your Resume before you loose your job.
    2. You should work on your Resume before you start to look for a job.
    3. If you work on your resume online, your employer could find out, and you could get in trouble.
  4. General
    1. You should not exaggerate on your resume.  
    2. You should make your Resume look professional.

    1. Illinois Workforce Information
      1. http://www.ilworkinfo.com 
    2. Career Builder
      1. ttp://www.careerbuilder.com/
     
    In Deed
     
    Chicago Jobs 
     

    Computer and Other training at the Fountaindale Public Library
    Website:            http://www.fountaindale.org/
    Instructions:        Click on FOUNTAINDALE PUBLIC LIBRARY SCHEDULE OF EVENTS for upcoming library events at Fountaindale Public Library
    Additional Info:    There is Microsoft Office training (Word, Excel, Access, Power Point), Basic Computing, Internet, etc.