Employment and Work

Creating Jobs Rebuilding America


Our nation’s infrastructure is collapsing, and the American people know it. Every day, they drive on roads with unforgiving potholes and over bridges that are in disrepair. They wait in traffic jams and ride in railroads and subways that are overcrowded. They see airports bursting at the seams.

For too many years, we have dramatically underfunded the physical infrastructure that our economy depends on. That is why I have proposed the Rebuild America Act, to invest $1 trillion over five years to modernize our infrastructure. It would be paid for by closing loopholes that allow profitable corporations to avoid paying taxes by, among other things, shifting their profits to the Cayman Islands and other offshore tax havens.

Importantly, the Rebuild America Act will support more than thirteen million good-paying jobs – jobs that our economy desperately needs.

— Senator Bernie Sanders

PUTTING 13 MILLION AMERICANS TO WORK
A PLAN TO REBUILD AMERICA

For most of our history, the U.S. proudly led the world in building infrastructure that grew our economy, gave our businesses a competitive advantage, and provided our workers a decent standard of living. Sadly, that is no longer the case.

Today, the U.S. spends less than 2 percent of GDP on infrastructure, less than at any point in the last twenty years. Meanwhile, Europe spends close to twice our rate, and China spends close to four times our rate. It is no wonder the World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Report now ranks our overall infrastructure at 12th in the world – down from 7th place just a decade ago.

The results are all around us:
One of every 9 bridges in our country is structurally deficient, and nearly a quarter are functionally obsolete. Almost one-third of our roads are in poor or mediocre condition, and more than 42 percent of all urban highways are congested. Transit systems across the country struggling to address deferred maintenance and 45% of American households lack any meaningful access to transit at all.

Senator Sanders’ Rebuild America Act would more than double the current level of funding for the highway and transit accounts of the Highway Trust Fund, and would create a National Infrastructure Bank to leverage private capital to finance more than $125 billion in new projects.
Much of our nation’s rail network is obsolete, even though our energy-efficient railroads move more freight than ever and Amtrak’s ridership has never been higher. While we debate the merits of high-speed rail, countries across Europe and Asia have gone ahead and built vast high-speed rail networks with trains that run at 125-200 miles per hour. Meanwhile, the Acela – Amtrak’s fastest train – travels at an average speed of just 65 miles per hour.

The Rebuild America Act will invest $75 billion to upgrade our passenger and freight rail lines, to move people and goods more quickly and efficiently. It’s time for America to catch up with the rest of the world.
America’s airports are bursting at the seams as the numbers of passengers and cargo have grown to all-time highs. Moreover – and rather incredibly – our airports still rely on antiquated 1960s radar technology, because we have chronically underfunded a new satellite-based air traffic control system.

The Rebuild America Act will invest $12.5 billion to improve airports across the country, and $17.5 billion to bring our air traffic control system into the 21st century by accelerating deployment of NextGen technology to make our skies safer and our airports more efficient.
Bottlenecks at our marine seaports – which handle 95% of all overseas imports and exports –prevent goods from getting to their destinations on time. The same is true for our inland waterways – which carry the equivalent of 50 million truck trips of goods each year.

The Rebuild America Act will invest an additional $15 billion over five years to clear the backlog of projects to improve inland waterways, coastal harbors and shipping channels. Our businesses simply can’t compete in the global economy if they can’t move their goods and supplies to, from and within our country more efficiently.
Right now, more than 4,000 of the nation’s 84,000 dams are considered deficient, and one of every eleven levees have been rated as “likely to fail” during a major flood.

The Rebuild America Act will invest $12 billion a year to repair and improve the high-hazard dams that provide flood control, drinking water, irrigation, hydropower, and recreation across the country; and the flood levees that protect our cities and our farms.
Much of our drinking water infrastructure is nearing the end of its useful life – we lose more than 2 trillion gallons of treated drinking water each year through leaking pipes, faulty meters and nearly a quarter-million water main breaks. Our wastewater treatment plants aren’t in much better shape: almost ten billion gallons of raw sewage are dumped into our nation’s waterways each year when plants fail or pipes burst.

The Rebuild America Act will invest $6 billion a year so states can improve the drinking water systems that provide Americans with clean, safe water; and $6 billion a year to improve the wastewater plants and stormwater infrastructure that protect water quality in our nation’s rivers and lakes.
America’s aging electrical grid – which consists of a patchwork of power generation, transmission, and distribution facilities, some of which date back to the early 1900s – simply isn’t up to 21st century challenges, including resiliency to cyber-attacks. It is no wonder the World Economic Forum ranks our grid at just 24th in the world in terms of reliability, just behind Barbados.

The Rebuild America Act will invest $10 billion a year for power transmission and distribution modernization projects to improve the reliability and resiliency of our ever more complex electric power grid. This investment will also position our grid to accept new sources of locally generated renewable energy, and it will address critical vulnerabilities to cyber-attacks.
The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development ranks the U.S. 16th in the world in terms of broadband access. We are only marginally better in terms of average broadband speed – 12th in the world. Today, businesses, schools and families in Bucharest, Romania have access to much faster internet than most of the United States. That is unacceptable and has got to change.

The Rebuild America Act will invest $5 billion a year to expand high-speed broadband networks in under-served and unserved areas, and to boost speeds and capacity all across the country. Internet access is no longer a luxury: it is essential for 21st century commerce, education, telemedicine, and public safety.

If $1 trillion over five years sounds like a lot of money, consider that the American Society of Civil Engineers says we need to invest $3.6 trillion by 2020 just to get our nation’s infrastructure to a state of good repair.That is $1.6 trillion short of current spending levels.

Moreover, there is an economic cost of not acting. Several studies have concluded that our deteriorating infrastructure already costs our economy close to $200 billion per year.

Further, investing in infrastructure is not just about “bricks and mortar.” At its core, it is about jobs and the economy.

While the economy has improved significantly since the worst days of the recession, our nation still faces a major jobs crisis. We need to create millions of decent paying jobs, and we need to create them now. And infrastructure spending is one of the best ways to do just that.

The Rebuild America Act would put more than thirteen million Americans to work in decent-paying jobs. These are jobs in sectors of the economy that haven’t fully recovered from the recession, like construction, and they are jobs that cannot be shipped offshore or outsourced overseas.

Moreover, each and every project will require equipment, supplies and services – from architects, engineers, and building materials and supply companies. Thirteen million Americans will spend their hard-earned salaries in their communities, supporting restaurants and local stores.

It is no wonder groups from across the political spectrum – from organized labor to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce – agree that investing in infrastructure makes sound economic sense. When spending goes up, both GDP and household incomes grow. Even the International Monetary Fund – long a proponent of economic austerity – now says that well-designed infrastructure projects spur almost $3 in economic output for each dollar spent.


Every family, every community and every business relies on our nations’ physical infrastructure to survive and to thrive. We expect that our roads, bridges and trains will get us to our destination without injury, and that our airports are modern and safe. We expect that our tap water is clean, and that our dams and levees won’t burst when it rains.

The good news is that it is not too late to get back on track. Let’s make a significant investment in the physical infrastructure on which our economy and our society depend upon. Let’s create the millions of jobs we desperately need by making our tax code fair and just. Let’s Rebuild America

— Senator Bernie Sanders

The best way to jumpstart growth is through fundamental tax reform.

A flat tax will increase after-tax income for all income groups.

The IRS should cease to exist as we know it.

We should reform the IRS so they can't target individuals based on their faith or political beliefs.

The IRS is prone to manipulation and stupid loop holes. 

Regulatory Reform

Too many small businesses are being crushed by encroaching regulations. 

We need to get the government out of the way so the people can do what they do best — innovate, expand, and create new jobs.

The President should pass the REINS Act, holding Congress accountable to vote on any major cost-inducing regulation.

There are a lot of dumb regulations in Obamacare. 

We need to enact reforms that make health care personal, portable, and affordable. We need to open insurance markets across state lines.

We should expand Health Savings Accounts.

We should delink health insurance from employment.

We should end the EPA regulations like the Waters of the U.S. rule and the Clean Power Plan that burden small businesses and farmers

Energy Renaissance

Another vital reform to unleash economic prosperity is adopting an energy plan that embraces the Great American Energy Renaissance.
We need an all-of-the-above energy approach that embraces the bountiful resources in this land — from oil to natural gas to ethanol. We need to open up abundant and affordable gas and electricity resources.
A President Cruz will approve the Keystone Pipeline, and other similar infrastructures, and empower the private sector to create good-paying American jobs.
We must harness our nation’s energy resources and remove federal impediments to energy exploration, development, and trade.


Stable Dollar

A stable dollar is also key to a prosperous nation. We are living through a period of great dollar instability that has weakened the economy at home and destabilized the entire world financial system. When the dollar is down, prices for goods like oil and food go up, which hurts consumers and industries such as trucking and airlines.
When the dollar is high as it is today, prices tend to fall, which is good for consumers, but farmers, ranchers, and the energy industry get hurt, as do American exporters. America needs a more stable dollar.
We need to audit the Federal Reserve. A rules-based monetary system would restore stability to the dollar and to the international currency system. This will help us get beyond these cycles of boom, bust, and malaise, and return us to rising productivity, strong economic growth, and higher incomes for all.


Internet Freedom

Internet freedom has produced robust free speech for millions and is an incubator for entrepreneurs to expand jobs and opportunities.
If the Internet Sales Tax becomes law, small online retailers would have to comply with over 9,600 tax jurisdictions across the country. It’s the corporate lobbyists who want to crush small businesses who favor the Internet tax.
Net Neutrality is Obamacare for the Internet.
The FCC is trying to regulate the Internet and turn it into a public utility.
Every time you put unelected bureaucrats in charge of a market, they stifle innovation and favor special interests — just look at the United States Post Office compared to Amazon and FedEx.

WHAT’S AT STAKE

The dynamism of the American workforce is our country’s greatest renewable natural resource. Jump-starting economic growth therefore requires that American workers have the skills that are needed to unleash their potential. One of the troubling features of the American economy today is the mismatch between the skill set of the American workforce and the requirements of the employment market. The gap between the two lies at the heart of our jobs crisis.

Over two centuries American workers have repeatedly proven themselves to be the most productive and the most capable at adapting themselves to changing economic conditions and embracing new technologies that come on stream. During that time, the American economy has also been the beneficiary of the extraordinary contributions made by the best and the brightest from around the world who have chosen to make our country their new home. This combination has propelled the American economy to heights envied across the world. It can do so again.

OBAMA’S FAILURE

President Obama’s approach to human capital is, here as elsewhere, to let government take the lead. The federal government has been pouring money into retraining programs. In fiscal year 2009, the sum total was $18 billion for 47 separate employment and job training programs administered by nine different federal agencies. Seven of the 47 programs account for three-fourths of the spending, but all except 3 of the 47 programs overlap with at least one other program.

Only 5 of the 47 programs have had their results thoroughly evaluated since 2004. According to the General Accounting Office (GAO), “little is known about the effectiveness of most programs.” It also turns out that the little we do know has not been particularly heartening. A 2008 study found that one of the five, the Workforce Investment Act Adult and Dislocated Workers program, produced only “small to nonexistent” results.

This is the kind of government waste, political horse-trading, and administrative chaos that has brought discredit on the federal government. We cannot afford to squander taxpayer money in this way. President Obama’s job retraining record is a live, ongoing demonstration of why federal spending in so many areas needs to be scaled back.

MITT’S PLAN

Mitt Romney sees two important objectives that America can pursue immediately to build on the extraordinary traditional strengths of its workforce. The first is to retrain American workers to ensure that they have the education and skills to match the jobs of today’s economy. The second is to attract the best and the brightest from around the world.

Retraining Workers

Mitt Romney will approach retraining policy with a conservative mindset that recognizes it as an area where the federal government is particularly ill-equipped to succeed. Retraining efforts must be founded upon a partnership that brings together the states and the private sector. The sprawling federal network of redundant bureaucracies should be dismantled and the funds used for better purposes. One particularly promising approach that Romney supports and believes states should be encouraged to pursue is a system of Personal Reemployment Accounts for unemployed individuals. These accounts would facilitate programs that place individuals directly into companies that provide on-the-job training—as governor of Massachusetts, Romney helped create just such a program.

  •   • Eliminate redundancy in federal retraining programs by consolidating programs and funding streams, centering as much activity as possible in a single agency
  •   • Give states authority to manage retraining programs by block granting federal funds
  •   • Facilitate the creation of Personal Reemployment Accounts
  •   • Encourage greater private sector involvement in retraining programs

Attracting the Best and the Brightest

To ensure that America continues to lead the world in innovation and economic dynamism, a Romney administration would press for an immigration policy designed to maximize America’s economic potential. The United States needs to attract and retain job creators from wherever they come. Foreign-born residents with advanced degrees start companies, create jobs, and drive innovation at an especially high rate. While lawful immigrants comprise about 8 percent of the population, immigrants start 16 percent of our top-performing, high-technology companies, hold the position of CEO or lead engineer in 25 percent of high-tech firms, and produce over 25 percent of all patent applications filed from the United States.

  •   • Raise visa caps for highly skilled workers
  •   • Grant permanent residency to eligible graduates with advanced degrees in math, science, and engineering

JOB CREATION

The United States is mired in the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, with more than 20 million Americans who are unemployed, underemployed, or who have stopped looking for work. President Obama has neglected the fundamental tasks of creating jobs and growing our economy. Instead, he’s focused his efforts on an anti-jobs, anti-growth agenda that has significantly expanded the role of the federal government. His actions have only succeeded in creating more of the uncertainty and obstacles to investment that threaten the economic vitality of our nation.

Mitt Romney has the experience and know-how to create jobs and help businesses grow. He spent over twenty-five years in the private sector, building businesses and creating jobs. Elected Governor of Massachusetts during an economic slump, Mitt Romney fought hard to make his state job-friendly and business competitive.

Over the course of this campaign, Mitt will lay out a detailed plan for what he will do as President to jump-start economic growth and help create jobs. His plan will be based on the following principles:

POLICY

SMALLER GOVERNMENT

Reverse President Obama’s massive expansion of federal power

We must cut federal spending to free up resources for productive investment, and curtail ever-expanding federal authority to provide businesses with the certainty and stability they need to make those investments. As President, Mitt Romney will place a hard cap on federal spending, forcing Washington politicians to control the size and growth of government.

ECONOMIC COMPETITIVENESS

Make America the most attractive place in the world to do business 

Today, more than ever, new businesses can choose where to form and existing ones can choose where to invest and hire. America has long been the most dynamic economy in the world, and we must not let our government change that. As President, Mitt Romney will:

  • Lower taxes on businesses to keep America competitive in the global economy
  • Slash bureaucratic red tape and place a hard cap on the impact that federal regulations can have on the economy
  • Limit the corrosive influence of union bosses on productive businesses

FREE TRADE ON FAIR TERMS

Open markets on fair terms for our products and services around the world

Access to foreign markets is crucial to growing our economy. We must reassert American leadership in international negotiations, follow through on commitments we have already made, and push aggressively for advantageous new agreements.

ENERGY SECURITY AND INDEPENDENCE

Meet the challenge of achieving a secure and affordable supply of fuels

We need to lower the amount of energy we use and increase the supply of domestic energy sources. Government must be a partner, not an obstacle, in this effort. As President, Mitt Romney will facilitate the exploration and development of conventional fossil fuels, remove the regulatory hurdles that prevent the construction of nuclear power plants, and address market failures that prevent the adoption of new technologies.

TRAINING AND PREPARING AMERICA’S WORKERS

Prepare the American workforce to succeed in a 21st-century economy

Our economy is rapidly changing. Some of the steps we must take to restart economic growth—for instance, expanding trade relationships and developing new sources of energy—will only hasten that evolution. We need to eliminate ineffective government handouts, and instead give workers the resources and responsibility to develop valuable skills and make the transition to new types of work.

Resume Pointers

  1. Resume Format
    1. You should save your Resume in plain text.
      1. Plain text may be easier to copy and paste into job sites.
      2. Some people don't want to see fancy formating, but just want your plain text resume e-mailed to them.
    2. You need multiple versions of your resume.
      1. Some employers will ask to see how much you made at each job.
      2. Some employers will want to see the name of your boss at each job
      3. Sometimes you will want to include references, and some times you won't
  2. Resume Sections
      1. Resume Sections: Contact Information
        1. Address
          1. You should put your address on a Resume.
            1. Reasons to agree:
              1. If you don't put your address, someone might assume you are from out of town, and might not waist their time on you.
            2. Reasons to disagree:
              1. If you put your address, and you are from out of town, someone might think you are unwilling to relocate.
      2. Resume Sections: Competencies 
        1. Such as Business Development, or Sales
      3. Resume Sections: Education
        1. Leaving off college beginning dates can lead an employer to think it took you a long time to graduate.
          1. Reasons to disagree:
            1. So what? Who cares how long it took to graduate. Bill Gates didn't graduate. Taking a break from college to have a family should not be a negative. You can drive yourself crazy coming up with all these stupid rules of what to do about your resume. If you think it looks bad to show your start and end dates you can leave them off, and if someone asks you why, you can put tell them the story.
        2. You should not abbreviate you school name.
          1. Reasons to agree:
            1. It looks lazy.
            2. Their are many BSUs: Ball State, Boise State, Bemidji State University, etc
          2. Reasons to disagree:
            1. Brigham Young might have negative connotations to a southern baptist recruiter. Maybe you should just leave it BYU.
      4. Resume Sections: Objective
      5. Resume Sections: Personal Profile
    1. Formating Options
      1. Chronological
        1. You should have both a chronological resume and non chronological resume.
  1. Resume Length
    1. A Resume should be one page.
      1. Reasons to disagree:
        1. Like all blanket statements, this is stupid.
        2. If you have headings, people will be able to they are looking for on your Resume.
        3. This may be true, if you are printing your resume, but if your Resume is on a Database, it may be looking for key words. The more words on your Resume, the more likely it is to get hit with a key word
    2. You should devote the most amount of time to your most recent job.
    3. You should devote the most amount of time to your most relevant job.
    4. You should devote the most amount of time to your highest paying job.
    5. A Resume should be like a good dress: long enough to cover the essentials but short enough to keep it interesting.
  2. Time Spent on Your Resume
    1. You should work on your Resume before you loose your job.
      1. Reasons to agree:
        1. It is depressing to do anything after you loose a job.
        2. Working on your Resume periodically helps you re-asses your career.
      2. Reasons to disagree:
        1. You will have more time to work on it after you loose your job.
        2. If you work on your resume online, your employer could find out, and you could get in trouble.
    2. You should work on your Resume before you start to look for a job.
      1. Reasons to agree:
        1. You don't want a potential employer to have a bad first impression of you by seeing a less impressive Resume.
    3. If you work on your resume online, your employer could find out, and you could get in trouble.
      1. Reasons to disagree:
        1. It is easy to make an online Resume private, so that no one can find it.
  3. General
    1. You should not exaggerate on your resume.  
    2. You should make your Resume look professional.

Cover Letter Pointers

  1. There is no such thing as a perfect cover letter
    1. Plain text may be easier to copy and paste into job sites.
    2. Some people don't want to see fancy formating, but just want your plain text resume e-mailed to them.
    3. There is no accounting for taste, and it is difficult to predict what type of person will be reviewing your Cover letter.
  2. It is hard to know what to put on your cover letter that is different than your Resume
    1. Reasons to disagree:
      1. You should not just repeat your resume, in a conversational tone for those who don't like to look at lists.
      2. You could use your Resume as a way of explaining gaps in employment, or other problems people might see from looking at your resume.
      3. There is no such thing as a perfect cover letter.
  3. Your cover letter should be short.
  4. Your cover letter should make the interviewer want to know more.
  5. Your cover letter should address your career goals
  6. Your cover letter should address experience.
  7. It is hard to know what to put on your cover letter that is different than your Resume.
    1. Reasons to disagree:
      1. You should not just repeat your resume, in a conversational tone for those who don't like to look at lists.
      2. You could use your Resume as a way of explaining gaps in employment, or other problems people might see from looking at your resume.
      3. There is no such thing as a perfect cover letter.
Do you know someone who is looking for a job? With the economy like it is, most of us do. This website is place for them and you to explore all aspects of the job searching experience.

Do you want to post reasons to disagree with really bad advice you have been given? 

With this website we can:
  1. Post Jobs we see in the Chicago area.
  2. Post pointers and tips
  3. Post Resumes?
Things religious groups should do to help people find jobs
  1. Get people who are willing to review resume's together with Resume's that need reviewing.




Career Specific

Accounting & Finance 
Advertising & Public Relations
Aerospace & Aviation
Arts & Entertainment & Publishing
Automotive 
Banking & Mortgage
Business Development
Business Opportunity 
Clerical & Administrative 
Construction & Facilities 
Consumer Goods 
Customer Service 
Education & Training 
Energy & Utilities 
Engineering 
Government & Military 
Green 
Healthcare 
Hospitality & Travel 
Human Resources 
Installation & Maintenance 
Insurance 
Internet 
Job Search Aids 
Law Enforcement & Security 
Legal 
Management & Executive 
Manufacturing & Operations 
Marketing 
Non-Profit & Volunteer 
Pharmaceutical & Biotech 
Professional Services 
QA & Quality Control 
Real Estate 
Restaurant & Food Service 
Retail 
Sales 
Science & Research 
Skilled Labor 
Technology 
Telecommunications 
Transportation & Logistics

Administration 
Cleaning 
Clerical 
College 
Data Entry 
Delivery 
Driver 
Industrial 
Maintenance 
Supervisor 
Warehouse

Caregiver 
Cashier 
Child Care 
Counselor 
Economic Recovery 
Housekeeper 
Janitor 
Merchandiser 
Nanny 
Packer 
Painter 
Receptionist 
Social Worker 
Store Manager


Chicago Resumes

Accounting & Finance 
Advertising & Public Relations
Aerospace & Aviation
Arts & Entertainment & Publishing
Automotive 
Banking & Mortgage
Business Development
Business Opportunity 
Clerical & Administrative 
Construction & Facilities 
Consumer Goods 
Customer Service 
Education & Training 
Energy & Utilities 
Engineering 
Government & Military 
Green 
Healthcare 
Hospitality & Travel 
Human Resources 
Installation & Maintenance 
Insurance 
Internet 
Job Search Aids 
Law Enforcement & Security 
Legal 
Management & Executive 
Manufacturing & Operations 
Marketing 
Non-Profit & Volunteer 
Pharmaceutical & Biotech 
Professional Services 
QA & Quality Control 
Real Estate 
Restaurant & Food Service 
Retail 
Sales 
Science & Research 
Skilled Labor 
Technology 
Telecommunications 
Transportation & Logistics

Administration 
Cleaning 
Clerical 
College 
Data Entry 
Delivery 
Driver 
Industrial 
Maintenance 
Supervisor 
Warehouse

Caregiver 
Cashier 
Child Care 
Counselor 
Economic Recovery 
Housekeeper 
Janitor 
Merchandiser 
Nanny 
Packer 
Painter 
Receptionist 
Social Worker 
Store Manager


How to Help a Friend find a Job



  1. Resume Format
    1. You should save your Resume in plain text.
    2. You need multiple versions of your resume
    3. Resume Sections
      1. Resume Sections: Contact Information
        1. Address
          1. You should put your address on a Resume.
      2. Resume Sections: Competencies 
        1. Such as Business Development, or Sales
      3. Resume Sections: Education
        1. Leaving off college beginning dates can lead an employer to think it took you a long time to graduate.
        2. You should not abbreviate you school name.
      4. Resume Sections: Objective
      5. Resume Sections: Personal Profile
    4. Formating Options
      1. Chronological
        1. You should have both a chronological resume and non chronological resume.
  2. Resume Length
    1. A Resume should be one page.
    2. You should devote the most amount of time to your most recent job.
    3. You should devote the most amount of time to your most relevant job.
    4. You should devote the most amount of time to your highest paying job.
    5. A Resume should be like a good dress: long enough to cover the essentials but short enough to keep it interesting.
  3. Time Spent on Your Resume
    1. You should work on your Resume before you loose your job.
    2. You should work on your Resume before you start to look for a job.
    3. If you work on your resume online, your employer could find out, and you could get in trouble.
  4. General
    1. You should not exaggerate on your resume.  
    2. You should make your Resume look professional.

    1. Illinois Workforce Information
      1. http://www.ilworkinfo.com 
    2. Career Builder
      1. ttp://www.careerbuilder.com/
     
    In Deed
     
    Chicago Jobs 
     

    Computer and Other training at the Fountaindale Public Library
    Website:            http://www.fountaindale.org/
    Instructions:        Click on FOUNTAINDALE PUBLIC LIBRARY SCHEDULE OF EVENTS for upcoming library events at Fountaindale Public Library
    Additional Info:    There is Microsoft Office training (Word, Excel, Access, Power Point), Basic Computing, Internet, etc.