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Texas is a huge state with amazing diversity and numerous large cities that have made the pro-wrestling scene in that state one of the country’s best. There has long been a love affair between Southerners and rasslin’ and it has been no different in Texas. Looking at the cultural makeup of the state, East Texas and North Texas are much more like their neighbors in the Deep South than they are like the rest of the state. Houston (in East Texas) and Dallas (in North Texas) were growing cities and Texas pro-wrestling first came to them. While there were many cities that could have been next, it was an unlikely one nestled up in the Texas Panhandle, Amarillo, which would become a hot spot. In the years prior to the NWA, Morris Sigel's Houston office bragged great control in Texas and their were smaller markets throughout the state.

Major changes came during the days of the NWA and the more importantly television. Houston continued to be the major power broker in Texas under Sigel. Dallas, reborn as Southwest Sports under Ed McLemore, began making strides toward becoming a better market as the city itself grew. Amarillo also continued to grow steadily. The growing popularity of pro-wrestling led to groups popping up throughout the Southwest. Mike London built a small empire out of Albuquerque, New Mexico that moved into El Paso, Texas and Denver, Colorado with ties to the Chicago and Amarillo offices. Rod Fenton in Arizona and Dave Reynolds in Utah were NWA affiliated operations into the 1960s.

In Texas, the three major offices - Houston, Dallas and Amarillo - grew throughout the 1950s and 1960s, however in the latter decade great changes came to all three. Sigel and McLemore died and their cities were taken over completely by Paul Boesch and Fritz Von Erich respectively. Houston was dubbed the Gulf Athletic Club and under Boesch remained an island city like St. Louis was a hot bed for the next twenty years. Dallas became Big Time Wrestling and continued to develop as a territory as the Dallas area transformed into the "Metroplex" with a massive population boom. After the Funk's took full control of Amarillo, they expanded South into most of West Texas.

The next great changes for Texas wrestling came as the NWA began to dissolve and priorities changed. In South Texas, San Antonio would break away from Dallas and become a significant market in its region. Houston hooked up with Mid-South and phased out lucha libre influences for Bill Watts' brand of pro-wrestling. The border towns like El Paso continued to play to the Mexican lucha libre fans and spot shows still occur to this day. Amarillo was losing steam, so the Funks sold off their shares and the region dissolved soon after. In the early 1980s, the pro-wrestling landscape began changing radically and Texas was as topsy-turvy as anyplace. Fritz Von Erich began pushing his sons and other young talent very hard and the new company, World Class Championship Wrestling enjoyed enormous success with an impressive young roster and diehard fanbase. After a few years of success as Southwest Championship Wrestling, San Antonio's hometown promotion was broken apart and a less impressive promotion Texas All-Star Wrestling was born. Houston continued to run strongly under Boesch whose ties to other promotions shifted over the years. In the last half of the 1980s, Texas wrestling fell apart. Texas All-Star, renamed "USA All-Star" went belly up. World Class was damaged by the brief departure of booker Ken Mantell, formation of Wild West Wrestling and the departures of talent. Paul Boesch eventually sold his city to the expanding WWF and joined their outfit and gave them a huge market in the state. Fritz Von Erich had tried to work together with other promoters to fend off the WWF's advances, but his company was rapidly disintergrating. Finally he formed a union with Memphis promoter Jerry Jarrett and created the United States Wrestling Association, which ran in both Tennessee and Texas. The alliance fell apart and the remains were used to form the Global Wrestling Federation (usually called "Global"), which lasted for several more years. Since that time, pro-wrestling in Texas has done very well on a grandscale with the WWF running several giant shows there. On a local level, Texas wrestling is nothing special, except in the border towns, where lucha libre continues to draw successfully.


Houston was to become the first major pro-wrestling city in Texas thanks to a pair of brothers from the Lower East Side in New York City. Morris and Julius Sigel had relocated to Houston when they were young. Julius took to boxing and worked his way into promoting small local fights. In the 1920s, the local wrestling promoter passed away and the brothers joined up to promote boxing and wrestling in Houston. During the 1930s, Julius moved out to Shreveport and Nacogdoches and Morris slowly developed an excellent system with promoters throughout the region. Other Texas promotions, El Paso, Amarillo, Lubbock, Galveston, Beaumont, Abilene, San Antonio and even Dallas were always second to Houston. Even Shreveport and New Orleans could not challenge Houston in drawing power. Houston was far enough away from the Northeast and California to avoid competition and he was often able to bring in their talents and further develop the city's strength. During the war years, Houston really emerged and Sigel developed an excellent reputation as a straight promoter. In the years following the war, Houston as a city saw a significant boom in population and subsequent wealth. Sigel brought fellow New Yorker Paul Boesch on board as his health began to decline to help run things. Sigel was a talented promoter with a major market, but Boesch was even better. Astute and inventive, Boesch employed his years of touring the world into transforming Houston into one of the strongest pro-wrestling markets of the day. After Sigel suffered a heart attack in the early 1950s, Boesch's role grew stronger and he continued Sigel's legacy of bringing in the best talent, establishing great local stars and always paying well due to the big houses. Boesch is also credited with innovating some of the premier gimmicks in pro-wrestling, including tag team wrestling (although that is still debated), "mud wrestling" and unique stipulated punishments for the loser in a blowoff match. 



Dallas saw a population and financial boom in the 1930s when oil was discovered in the region at the start of the decade. Houston had opened up and Dallas soon followed with Bertram Willoughby promoting the town. From the start, Dallas produced their own local stars, but were able to secure a few top national stars from time to time. The operation found a regular home when the Sportatorium was erected in 1936. The weekly wrestling shows were a successful attraction and boxing ran regularly there as well. At that time, Ed McLemore began working for Willoughby at the Sportatorium. He slowly climbed the ladder before and took over the promotion in 1940. 


Ed Don George
Everett Marshall
Doc Sarpolis
Frank Sexton
Ray Steele


Southwest Sports (1940-1966) 

In 1940, Ed McLemore took over the Dallas operation and formed "Southwest Sports." He ran the promotion concurrently to Morris Sigel in Houston. Throughout the 1940s, McLemore was a local promoter for the Houston office, which had control over much of Texas. He continued a formula similiar his predecessor Bert Willoughby with the pre-NWA stars coming in to battle his local heroes. Late in the decade, Dallas and the Sportatorium saw big changes. The NWA was formed and McLemore became their Dallas affiliate. The Sportatorium grew a national reputation as the home of the "Big D Jamboree" country program. In 1953, McLemore left the NWA and severed his ties with Houston. Soon after the Sportatorium was burned down in a suspicious manner. It was rebuilt, McLemore rejoined the NWA and continued to promote wrestling in the Dallas area. The formation of the National Wrestling Alliance, development of the television and economic stability caused numerous regional markets to change and Dallas was no different. In the early 1960s, Fritz Von Erich came to town. He was one of the premier stars of the 1950s and wanted to settle down in the region. He went to war with McLemore, aligned with Houston promoter Paul Boesch and San Antonio promoter Joe Blanchard to take over the city. 


Joe Blanchard
Tony Borne
Bull Curry
Mike DiBiase
Pepper Gomez
Ray Gunkel
Miguel "Black" Guzman
Duke Keomuka
Killer Karl Kox
Mark Lewin
Danny McShain
Louis Tillet
Rito Romero
Fritz Von Erich

CLICK HERE for the full Dallas alumni list



Amarillo in Western Texas had been a smaller market since the 1920s. Cal Farley was a local jack-of-all-trades, he ran a tire shop, a department store, hosted a radio show, worked a part-time pro wrestler and had a famous boys ranch. He began promoting pro-wrestling in Amarillo with European grappler Dutch Mantell, but it was only a small deal. There were other small promotions in West Texas during this time: John McIntosh is El Paso, Jim Wakefield in Abilene and Sled Allen in Lubbock. By the 1940s, Dory Detton was running Amarillo, but his operation was minor compared to Houston and even to Dallas. In 1950, Dory Funk, Sr. came to town and established his local fame as a superintendent for Cal Farley's Boys Ranch and he did some pro-wrestling on the side. Funk left with his family in 1953, but Karl "Doc" Sarpolis invited him back to begin seriously promoting Amarillo in the mid-1950s when pro-wrestling was growing from the TV boom. The two took the city to a new level of success in this age of television and NWA affiliates. The territory developed into a solid operation with the towns being run by local promoters and talent flowing around the region. The established cities were passed down: Gory Guerrero in El Paso, Don Slatton in Abilene, Nick Roberts in Lubbock as well as Pat O'Dowdy in Odessa and Jerry Kozak promoted Amarillo itself, where the central booking office was located. They also expanded out into Albuquerque, New Mexico with Mike London and Colorado Springs, Colorado. This region was built with a television show that featured studio wrestling from Amarillo, which featured some rough and tough matches. In 1966, Sarpolis passed away and Funk's two sons, Dory Jr. and Terry, bought his shares. The Funk trio worked hard to improve the territory in the late 1960s and Dory Jr. was eventually made NWA World Heavyweight champion. Though he was not in the territory regularly after that, the win elevated Amarillo and allowed Terry Funk to get himself into a top slot as well. In 1973, Dory Sr. died and his sons continued to run the company through the end of the decade. The company was sold to Blackjack Mulligan and Dick Murdoch and ran for a short time longer before the crush of national wrestling forced its doors to close. 


Mike DiBiase
Kozak Brothers (Nick & Jerry)
Dory Funk, Jr.
Dory Funk, Sr.
Terry Funk
Killer Karl Kox
Sputnik Monroe
Dick Murdoch
Ciclon Negro
Thunderbolt Patterson
Bull Ramos
Ricky Romero
Ray Stevens
Johnny Valentine
Fritz Von Erich

CLICK HERE for the full Amarillo alumni list



Southwestern States [Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah] 

Pro-wrestling in the Southwestern United States had been met with mixed results. Several operation popped up, often affiliated with a stronger office, but only a handful achieved much success. In the the days before the National Wrestling Alliance, Jack Kanner ran Colorado, the legendary Jim Londos ran Arizona with a partner for many years and Clayton Fisher operated out of Albuquerque, New Mexico for a stretch. Colorado had been a decent market and local boy Everett Marshall became the regional champion, but few notable stars came out of this region during that time. In 1939, a tough middleweight grappler named Mike London came to Albuquerque and eventually opened up shop there. He eventually bought nearby El Paso, Texas from promoter John McIntosh and began building his power base. When the NWA formed in 1948, it took them time to build their membership. London joined in 1950 at the third annual meeting and remained a member until 1983. The following year, Utah promoter Dave Reynolds joined and he maintained his membership for a decade although his operation was small with a limited talent pool. In 1954, Arizona promoter Rod Fenton joined. He brought a nice array of stars and discovered Gene Kiniski at the University of Arizona during his stint there. London expanded his operation into Colorado with the assistance of Chicago's Fred Kohler. They eventually went toe-to-toe with Johnny Doyle and Jim Barnett's American Wrestling Alliance over Denver, but won out in the end. After Dave Reynolds left Utah, the state was targetted by a non-NWA operation involving Guy Brunetti. As for Rod Fenton in Arizona, opportunities in Vancouver, British Columbia pulled him North and the market became the focus of a variety of independent promoters for the next two decades. When Mike London was gone, the major cities in the southwest were picked up by the AWA and WWF with the winning out in the end. 


Frankie Cain
[Arizona]
Leo Garibaldi
[Arizona]
Chavo Guerrero
[New Mexico]
Rip Hawk
[New Mexico]
John Paul Henning 
[Arizona]  
The Kangaroos (Al Costello & Roy Heffernan) 
[New Mexico] 
Don Kent 
[Arizona]  
Reggie Lisowski (The Crusher)
[Colorado]
El Gran Lothario 
[Arizona] 
Ken Lucas 
[Arizona]  
Everett Marshall 
[Colorado]
Luis Martinez 
[Arizona] 
Bobby Mayne (Bobby Jaggers) 
[Arizona] 
Sputnik Monroe 
[Arizona] 
Pat O'Connor 
[Colorado]
Miguel Perez (Mike DiBiase) 
[New Mexico] 
Bull Ramos
[New Mexico]
Ricky Romero 
[Arizona  & New Mexico]
Nelson Royal 
[Arizona] 
Reggie Siki
[Arizona] 
Dick Steinborn 
[New Mexico] 
Toru Tanaka 
[New Mexico] 
John Tolos 
[Arizona] 
Karl Von Steiger 
[New Mexico] 
Kurt Von Steiger 
[Arizona] 
Bearcat Wright 
[Arizona] 
Jim Wright 
[Arizona] 



Big Time Wrestling (1966-1981)
Fritz Von Erich was one of the top heels in the United States when he rolled into Dallas in the 1960s. After a few years working with Sportatorium owner Ed McLemore, Von Erich decided to take over the city. He created an alliance with Houston promoter Paul Boesch, San Antonio promoter Joe Blanchard as well as his connections from touring the United States to seize control. In the late 1960s, he turned babyface and began feuding with "Playboy" Gary Hart and his various charges as well as other excellent heels that came to Dallas. When McLemore died in 1969, Von Erich took over the Sportatorium, the Southwest Sports promotion and worked hard to turn Dallas into one of the best promotion around. Von Erich had a great core of talent throughout the 1970s from rough-and-tough types to highflyers to great talkers, Big Time was just as its name claimed. As the decade came to a close, Fritz's children began their careers in the territory and he began phasing himself out as an in-ring performer. By this time Fritz was a wealthy man with investments all over the region in real estate. The Von Erich boys had a certain marketability that would led the promotion to a great rise and fall in the 1980s. 


Ox Baker
Red Bastien
Joe Blanchard
Bruiser Brody
Gary Hart
Duke Keomuka
Mark Lewin
Wahoo McDaniel
The Spoiler
Johnny Valentine
David Von Erich
Fritz Von Erich
Kevin Von Erich

CLICK HERE for the full Big Time Wrestling alumni list



Gulf Athletic Club (1967-1987)
In 1966, Morris Sigel died and his long-time right-hand man Paul Boesch took over the promotion completely the following year. Although Boesch had long been the true power behind the Houston office, it was not until Sigel's death that he was officially granted that role. As a result, business largely remained the same as before. Over the next twenty years, Boesch built a reputation as one of the best promoters in the world. Pro-wrestling in most markets was struggling in the late 1960s and Houston was no different. Boesch's first accomplishment in charge was building it back up with Johnny Valentine as his main man. He also began working with Fritz Von Erich's Dallas office and used some of the same talent to rejuventate the city. Boesch also began capitalizing on the local Latin market by pushing Mexican-American wrestlers and eventually bringing in some of the top luchadors, which led to them branching out into other Texas offices. Boesch was getting older and brought in his nephew Peter Birkholtz to help him run the Houston office. As time passed, his alliances continually shifted. He worked with Joe Blanchard's San Antonio outfit for a time, he left the NWA for a stint after NWA Champion Harley Race repeatedly no-showed, AWA star Nick Bockwinkel bought into the promotion and the office eventually settled on a working relationship with Bill Watts' Mid-South promotion. It was a great match and mutually benefitial for the next few years. Then in 1987, events were put into motion that would ultimately end "Houston Wrestling" as a local brand. It began when Jim Duggan jumped to the WWF unannounced. He was the top babyface for both promotions and it created discention that built to a Boesch-Watts split. after Boesch aligned with the WWF, while Watts was forced to sell out to the Crocketts. Boesch would turn to the Crocketts himself the following year for a time before his death in 1989. 


Skandor Akbar
Nick Bockwinkel
Paul Boesch
Bruiser Brody
Ted DiBiase
Jim Duggan
Dynamic Duo (Tully Blanchard & Gino Hernandez)
Pepper Gomez
Superstar Graham
Junkyard Dog
Ernie Ladd
Blackjack Lanza
Mil Mascaras
Stan Stasiak
Johnny Valentine

CLICK HERE for the full Houston alumni list



SWCW - Southwest Championship Wrestling (1978-1985)
In 1978, San Antonio promoter Joe Blanchard pulled out of his relationship with Fritz Von Erich and the Dallas office. He was determined to start a promotion and capitalize on the big markets in Eastern Texas. First, he targeted Houston and it was a huge failure. Afterward he formed a relationship with Houston promoter Paul Boesch that helped Blanchard's group get some traction. From there, they built up their contacts and relations steadily. They brought in some of the best Texas natives, some great Latin or faux-Latin talent, some of the most established names and some of the best workers of the day. Southwest Championship Wrestling became popular for their reliance on traditional wrestling and blood. As the promotion grew so did their marketability. They secured a national cable deal with USA, which propelled them to another level. They aligned themselves with Georgia Championship Wrestling, which gave them a tremendous talent pool to draw from at the time. They began running shows outside their region in California, Ohio and Georgia. However, it all fell apart very quickly. First, the Houston office realigned with Mid-South. Second, they lost their deal with USA and the WWF took over. Third, Georgia severed ties due to their own problems. Fourth, Blanchard's partner Fred Berhend sold their local TV time slot to Fritz Von Erich. The promotion imploded and Blanchard sold out to Berhend, who would start a new promotion from Southwest's ruins. 


Abdullah the Butcher
Adrian Adonis
Joe Blanchard
Tully Blanchard
Nick Bockwinkel
Bruiser Brody
Killer Brooks
Eric Embry
Manny Fernandez
Gino Hernandez
Bobby Jaggers
Jos LeDuc
Wahoo McDaniel
The Sheepherders
Bob Sweetan

CLICK HERE for the full Southwest alumni list



WCCW - World Class Championship Wrestling (1981-1989)
Fritz Von Erich had become the top dog in Dallas and in the early 1980s, his talented sons took over his spot. World Class secured some of the most talented young wrestlers, who were also prone to self-destruction as the pro-wrestling world would witness in the years that followed. From 1982 to 1985, World Class was the hottest promotion going. The Von Erich boys were handsome hometown kids, the Freebirds were their brash, hard-living antagonists. This feud was the biggest money feud, but they also had innovative feuds involving valets on one end of the spectrum and deaths on the other. David Von Erich was the first to pass, but as time passed, more and more began dying. By 1986, World Class had withdrawn from the NWA and reinvigorated the company for a time, then they aligned with the UWF, which helped too. After the NWA bought out the UWF, booker Ken Mantell left WCCW to start his own company. This was a hard blow, though Mantell eventually returned. By this point, the pro-wrestling world was rocked by the national expansion of Vince McMahon and the ideas that made World Class a hot commodity were being recycled. Eric Embry took over booking duties and drastically changed the direction of the company. A deal was made with Memphis-based promoter Jerry Jarrett to sell the company's assets to him, create a new company and the Von Erichs would retain some control. This company lasted for over a year, but the shift from World Class to the USWA had been a key angle. When it closed, Kevin Von Erich attempted to revive World Class, but lacked the funding or cast to succeed. Into the mid-1990s, attempts to bring back World Class occurred with no notable successes. 

Skandor Akbar
Chris Adams
Bruiser Brody
The Freebirds (Michael Hayes, Terry Gordy & Buddy Roberts)
Gorgeous Jimmy Garvin
The Great Kabuki
Gary Hart
Gino Hernandez
Kamala
Ken Mantell
Iceman King Parsons
David Von Erich
Fritz Von Erich
Kerry Von Erich
Kevin Von Erich

CLICK HERE for the full World Class alumni list



Texas All-Star (1985-1986)
After Southwest Championship Wrestling was largely destroyed by Fred Brehends, he attempted several new companies: LoneStar Wrestling, Texas All-Star Wrestling and USA All-Star Wrestling. At the outset of the 1980s, Houston, Dallas and San Antonio were all excellent promotion in Eastern Texas. By the mid-1980s National expansion by the WWF had indirectly ended to of those promotions and Dallas was significantly weaker than it had been. Brehends was struggling to pull together a San Antonio promotion, but it was doomed to failure. There were numerous Texas favorites who he could secure, but the market had changed and it was difficult to compete. Brehends changed their "Texas" name to "USA" in hopes of appearing less regional, but the perceptions ran deeper than the name. Not surprisingly, the promotion eventually died out and many moved on to bigger gigs or different projects. 


Black Gordman
Jonathan Boyd
Bruiser Brody
Killer Brooks
Scott Casey
Tiger Conway Jr.
Chavo Guerrero
Gory Guerrero
Austin Idol
Jose Lothario
Al Madril
Shawn Michaels
Iceman Parsons
Ivan Putski



Wild West Wrestling (1987)
Ken Mantell had been one of the key minds behind the success of World Class Championship Wrestling in the early 1980s. After the company began having problems in 1986, Mantell was lured away by Bill Watts. Several World Class left with him and after a stint in the UWF, Mantell left to start his own group. Wild West Wrestling was an interesting project with various strengths and weaknesses. Mantell was one of the best bookers in pro-wrestling and had secured a good pool of talent with exposure in both World Class and the UWF. They also had long-time World Class announcer Bill Mercer who had a strong familiarity with them. However, Wild West's home base was a popular bar in Fort Worth, which gave them a unique, but perhaps low-budget look. Also their talent pool was good, but lacked the drawing power they needed. Though the group was short-lived and many went to World Class after it closed, Wild West's formation was a damaging blow to both World Class and the UWF. Amongst the embarassements was the jump of Lance Von Erich (the fake cousin of the Von Erich boys), whose career was killed by this move. After its death, Mantell returned as 40% partner in World Class by buying Fritz Von Erich's assets along with Kevin and Kerry Von Erich. 


Scott Irwin
Ken Mantell
The Missing Link
Iceman Parsons
Buddy Roberts



USWA - United States Wrestling Association (1988-1990)
The Von Erichs' Dallas-based WCCW and Jerry Jarrett Memphis-based CWA joined forces in 1988 to create the USWA. Jarrett owned 60% of it and the Von Erichs owned 40%, so World Class maintained much of its power base and even used the same banner for a time. Dallas had been a huge market, but now it was struggling. Many of the past WCCW stars had left for the "Big Two" and those who had not were victims of the lifestyle: shells of once great competitors or often-forgotten casualties. The USWA in Dallas was a hard venture, but an infusion of Memphis talent and new young talent helped the company become profitable again. The relationship between the two camps was strained due to money and when they lost their TV slot, it all dissolved. Kerry had left for the WWF by this point, so it was up to Kevin to keep the World Class legacy alive. Within a few years, a physically broken down Kevin was the only Von Erich boy still alive and World Class seemed more like a cursed relic of the past than a once glorious trendsetter. 


Chris Adams
Skandor Akbar
"Stunning" Steve Austin
Bam Bam Bigelow
Matt Borne
Killer Brooks
Cactus Jack
Steve Casey
Bill Dundee
Frank Dusek
Eric Embry
Tatsumi Fujinami
Robert Fuller
Ron Garvin
Robert Gibson
Jimmy Golden
Terry Gordy
Chavo Guerrero
Michael Hayes
Kamala
Buddy Landell
Jerry Lawler
Mil Mascaras
Kendo Nagasaki
King Parsons
Al Perez
Percy Pringle [Manager]
The Punisher (The Undertaker)
P.Y. Chu Hi (Phil Hickerson)
Buddy Roberts
Terry Taylor
Tennessee Stud Stable (Robert Fuller & Jimmy Golden)
Kerry Von Erich
Kevin Von Erich
Steve Williams
Tojo Yamamoto
The Zodiac (Gary Young)




GWF - Global Wrestling Federation (1991-1994)
Pro-wrestling in Texas had really been rocked by the national expansion of the WWF, but there was still a solid core of talent. Jerry Jarrett had tried to capitalize on this, but various problems convinced him to leave. This left a void that media-savvy Joe Pedicino, Bonnie Blackstone and Max Andrews along with booker Bill Eadie (the Masked Superstar) tried to fill. He secured a TV deal with ESPN and America One, unfortunately the pro-wrestling scene was at a low point and he was not able to survive those hard times. Global was a regional promotion that played an important role in pro-wrestling by giving young talent a place to hone their skills. Like the USWA and Smoky Mountain in Tennessee, ICW/IWCCW in the Northeast and South-Atlantic and Georgia All-Star in the Southeast, Global is remembered for giving exposure to some of the major talent of the 1990s. At the time, Global, like those companies, was looked at as third-rate to pro-wrestling fans. They were seemingly using has-beens and nobodies and did not leave much of an impression as a promotion, but definitely did on the future pro-wrestling landscape. 


Chris Adams
General Skandor Akbar [Manager]
Bad News Allen
Steve Austin
Ax the Demolisher
"Killer" Tim Brooks
Bad News Brown
Cactus Jack
Dirty White Boy (Tony Anthony)
Jimmy Garvin
Terry Garvin
"Hot Stuff" Eddie Gilbert
Terry Gordy
Michael Hayes
Sam Houston
Austin Idol
Buddy Landell
Stan Lane
One Man Gang
Iceman King Parsons
Al Perez
Ivan Putski
"Hustler" Rip Rogers
Adrian Street
Kerry Von Erich
Koko B. Ware



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