Reformed Theology

The main idea behind Reformed theology is that it seeks to be as consistent with biblical revelation as possible. It tries to follow in the legacy of the Reformation in which the Bible is the final source of authority regarding any teaching by men within the church. Another emphasis is the total sovereignty of God in all of life. This includes how one comes to the saving knowledge of God. Many opponents within the church hate Reformed theology because it goes against their rebellion against being totally dependent on God for everything, including their salvation. They believe that for God to be loving, he must be fair with everyone. They think that people must be given an equal opportunity to be saved and that God cannot have any favorites or that God cannot exercise his willingness to draw some and reject others. 

Yet, Israel and the Jewish race is an obvious example of God doing that very thing. They were the chosen people that God used to write down his revelation and make it available to the world. The Bible says that there was nothing special about his selection of the Jews to accomplish his purposes and that it was a sovereign choice on God's part. Yet, many theologians reject that notion and actually wind up making a judgment against God. They state that God is unfair if he chooses some and rejects others. Yet, the Bible is filled with examples of God exerting his sovereign choice, even before some people were born. 

Job learned the hard way that he cannot judge the actions of God. We are finite creatures and God does not owe us an explanation for what he does. To do so reeks of self-righteousness in which we are making a value judgment against God and what he chooses to do. The Reformed faith believes that God is sovereign and that he will do what he please without asking us for our permission. He has total sovereignty and can do whatever he desires. He rules the universe as total sovereign. From that perspective and God's revealed word, we seek to work out the theology that best reflects the way Christianity should be worked out within the world in which we live. 



Reformed Theology





Reformed Distinctive

Reformed Distinctive


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