Point of view nonfiction














Literature provides a lens through which readers look at the world. Point of view is the way the author allows you to "see" and "hear" what's going on. Skillful authors can fix their readers' attention on exactly the detail, opinion, or emotion the author wants to emphasize by manipulating the point of view of the story.

Here are some examples: First Person Point of View
                                          Second Person Point of View
                                          Third Person Point of View

   
Nonfiction comes to us through biographies, autobiographies, memoirs, journals, essays, science books, documentary films, book reports, encyclopedias. This, obviously, isn't a complete list.


                                                                                             "Advice to Youth" by Mark Twain

Read Mark Twain's piece "Advice to Youth," in which he lends advice that mocks the traditional rules given during youth. Clearly, bias is involved; Twain embraces the idea of individuality and uses exaggeration to demonstrate this fact. An example from his piece includes "Always obey your parents, when they are present."  Parents would probably cringe hearing his advice if they failed to recognize the humor! Remember to keep in mind who the narrator is, what he is, and if he is reliable.


Point of View game
#1   Point of View game #2  Point of View game #3  Point of View game #4

Video showing how character shapes your weight.

Your Turn! Locate a piece of nonfiction, and copy, paste, and summarize it. Provide the title and author. Then, determine the point of view, and then discuss the perspective and reliability of the author.  
  •  What is the author's bias?
  •  Does he exaggerate? Underestimate?
  •  Is he knowledgeable about the subject matter?
  •  How might another person view the subject matter?

Choose any type of web tool to present your work!

7H: Locate a piece of nonfiction from Science news. Copy, paste, and summarize it. Provide the title and author. Then, discuss the perspective and reliability of the author.  

Choose any type of web tool to present your work!