Make Ice Cream
https://5162074197685336383-a-1802744773732722657-s-sites.googlegroups.com/site/windintheroses/omsaflink_syrple.GIF?attachauth=ANoY7crOxpoinZlJrXIwmmJaF3Gca3GIwtSOf9vaBWixaE5mIYXDY0lfO9El-cEEGlKNYo-mxiQS2botpKMRfwewyplzYcdOYA9klvpXO35XRApZOHydMHvSEMGMJcAVIp3-AdVHG18Yh_WlUJmf_uJp3SL682DRedh-etPUi8fqEHwxmiXEQNaHSP0ZWKHxcQrcjY7raJMxoxPpQ7L7OMEXR7f5CbSpxg%3D%3D&attredirects=0
You can make ice cream with an electric mixer and your freezer. Cream can be store-bought or skimmed from non-homogenized milk, either pasteurized or raw (but do not use "ultra-pasteurized").To collect cream from raw milk, let  milk stand for a day, draw off cream on top with a turkey baster or siphon off milk with a plastic tube. You can use cream that is either sweet or cultured.

To make ice cream with a cultured cream
Start by clabbering raw milk or cream.


Get a quart or liter of raw milk.




Put the milk into glass jars and cover.


To use pasteurized milk or cream, add a cold milk culture to the milk or cream and then wait until it cultures and then proceed. Cold milk cultures can be such things as yogurt, kefir or finely shredded raw cheese.

Set it out on the counter until it clabbers. This may take a week or more the first time. You can speed this process up by putting some already clabbered milk or other dairy culture into it. Other dairy cultures could be soured cream, creme fraiche, fromage frais or fil mjolk. Yogurt is not suitable for use with raw milk. (See Culturing Dairy)


Separate whites and yolks from 2 eggs.


Add the 2 egg yolks to the clabbered milk.


Add 1/4 cup of maple syrup, raw honey or other syrup sweetener of your choice. (See Sugar Syrup on how to make your own sugar syrup - not a healthy alternative. Golden syrup would also work well with this. It could also be sweetened with fruit and stevia.

Add a pinch of cream of tartar and [optional] a teaspoon of liquor such as rum.


(A tablespoon of liquor such as rum will make it crystalize more finely, but, alas, I did not have any liqueur on hand when I made this. A teaspoon of vanilla extract would also serve the purpose of providing some alcohol to it.)


Mix it all well with an electric mixer.



I added some mashed overripe peaches to mine. I put a small amount of the milk into a blender (not pictured) and blended on high to mix half the peeled peaches to a puree, and chopped the other half up, and then mixed them in with milk/sugar mix thoroughly.



Transfer to containers suitable for freezing and put in the freezer for about 4 hours, or until semi-frozen.


Remove from freezer and beat until slushy. Return to freezer. Repeat this process every 2-4 hours, taking from freezer, beating until smooth and returning to freezer.



When ice cream is as frozen and smooth as it's going to be, keep it covered and frozen until ready to serve.
There  is no denying that expensive, all-cream ice cream tastes a lot better than frozen milk. This would taste a lot better if it were made of cream, either all cream or half cream and half raw milk. People will be disappointed if you call this ice cream. You would do better to call it frozen probiotic dairy. I would recommend learning how to make this to anyone whose children are too young to have had real ice cream yet. They'll love it, and it may even postpone the day when they discover chemical-laden mass-produced ice cream, which probably doesn't have any more cream in it than this does.

You can also use all raw cream to make this, if you are so inclined. You can use pasteurized, store-bought cream also, but you will have to culture it. See Culturing Dairy on how to "re-raw" pasteurized dairy using cultured or sour creams.


  Vanilla Ice Cream 

3 egg yolks
1/2 cup honey or maple syrup
2 teaspoons vanilla
3 cups raw cream or fresh , non-UHT cream

Preparation or things to have on hand:

Add a culture to the cream if it is pasteurized and let it set until cultured. (See Culturing Dairy for more information on types of cultures to use)

After cream is cultured:

Beat the egg yolks
Add honey and vanilla and mix until well combined.
Stir in cream and then mix in mixer until thoroughly blended.
Put in freezer-safe containers and freeze
Take out after an hour and beat in the mixer again
Repeat every hour until it becomes ice cream.

 Egg Yolk Ice Cream 

Mix together in blender:

Six egg yolks
1 pint of raw cream or clabbered -or- cultured pasteurized heavy or double cream -or- unpasteurized sour cream
3 tablespoons of unrefined sugar

1 tablespoon of honey
1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract.

Freeze until semi frozen. Remove from freezer and beat in mixer. Return to freezer. Repeat until it has the right consistency for ice cream.

  Path of Least Resistance    

The first people to enjoy ice cream were probably dairy maids who milked the cows on cold, winter mornings and noticed that the cream  that began to freeze on the top of the milk had an interesting taste and texture. There is much to be said for forgetting about this modern concoction called ice cream and going back to the original ice cream, cream that was frozen, and learn to love that. Get some heavy raw cream, or pasteurized cream to which you have added some live cultures, and put it in small cups (one for everyone having it) and put it in the freezer. When it's time to serve, put a little honey and vanilla or a tablespoon of maple syrup on top.

On my counter I keep an ongoing cold milk culture. If organic cream was on sale that week, there's organic cream in it. If the raw milk guy made it to the farmer's market, there's raw milk. If not, it has milk from Guernsey cows pastured on kelp-fertilized grass. In other words, it's the best milk I could get at the time. When I want ice cream, I take some of my cultured dairy, whatever combination of milk and cream it happens to be at the moment, add honey and vanilla or other flavorings, and put it in the freezer for an hour and a half. No, it's not as good as proper ice cream, but I came to the point where I accepted that it would be too expensive to buy real ice cream and too much work to make it myself and this is good-tasting enough if you don't expect it to be commercial ice cream.


Goats Produce Too! The Udder Real Thing Volume II Cheese Making & more by Mary Jane Toth. It includes pasteurization in its recipes, but you don't have to pasteurize, except for the mozzarella and yogurt. (Mozzarella has to be heated to 100F make it stretchy). All the others can be made with raw milk and skip the pasteurization.
The Untold Story of Milk  by Ron Shmid. This book has the complete story of milk production and sales in the US, along with the reasons why it is better to drink it raw.

My e-Books
   

  



Site-Related Products Available For Sale Online
Maple Sugar
Sucanat
Sorghum Syrup
Rubber Spatula


Stove / Heater

Vanilla




Table of Contents
adding raw egg to hot liquid || adjust alcohol || airlock || alcoholism || ale || antibiotics questions || apples || arthritis || avatars || balaclava || beans and rice || beets || bone broth || book suggestions ||  bread beer || bread kvass || brew by bottle || brine pickling for beginners || cabbage water || cancer || carrot cake || casserole || chocolate || cholesterol || chutney || clay || cleaning stuff || coffee || coloring drawings || coloring pages || condiments || container gardening || cookware || corn || cosmetics || cream cheese || cream of wheat || culturing milk and cream || cure alcoholism? || dandelions || dehydrating || depression era living || dmso || e-books for sale || "e. coli infections" || eat dirt || eating less || edible leaves and flowers || eggs || elderberry syrup || EM || evolution || evolution for children || exercise || fast food || fermented malt tea || fermented sun tea || fish, how to filet || fish head soup || fizzy drink || flour || flu || food allergies || food circle || free e-books || frugal healthy eating || fungus in body || grains || grain-free || green tomatoes || gruit ale || hard iced tea || healthy eating || heartburn and indigestion || home remedies || how to not get sick || how to publish on kindle || ice cream || instant NT || japonica quince, identifying || kefir whey || kelp || kimchi & sauerkraut || kombucha || kvass || lard || lemon pickles || lemon pudding || lifestyle || liver || liver loaf || living on less || lunchmeat || make animated gif || make whey || magnesium || magnesium diy || magnesium oxide || magnesium sulfate diy || mead || mincemeat || minerals || mold || moldy lemon uses || msg || mustard plaster || my drawings || near beer || oneil's shebeen || pekmez || penicillin diy || pesticides || physic garden || pickles || pie crust || plums || POGs || poor richard's ale || pork pie || preserving eggs || quince cheese || quince curd || quince honey || quince jam || quince soda || quince syrup || radiation exposure || raw beer || raw corn beer || raw fermented fish || raw milk || re-downloading a kindle book || roots beer || salsa || seafood || search natural health sites || search this site || separating egg yolk and white || seven day ale || shoes made of junk || small beer || snacks || soda pop || song of ninkasi || soughism || soup || sourdough beer || sourdough bread || spores (breathing in mold) || sprouting || substitutions || sugar syrup || supplements || survivalism || tea || timeline || tree oils || umeboshi || using frozen || using unset jam || vegetables || vertigo || vitamin C || water || way to lose weight || wheat grass beer || wild food || wild yeast harvesting || wine || yeast starter || yogurt