T.S. CAMPBELL 

Welcome to the                                        

WICK SEA CADETS

                                             WEB SITE

 

Photographer. A McGee 

Photographer, A McGee
 
WE HAVE MOVED TO OUR NEW PREMISES IN THE SCOUT HALL. KIRKHILL, WICK
PARADE NIGHTS: TUESDAY 19:00 Hrs.

 


JUNIOR SECTION RECUITMENT

******************************************************************************************************** 

 

Photographer, A McGee

 

 

MORE PICTURES IN GALLERY

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

 
                     

==========================-----------------=======================

 

 

 _________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________

 


wick Cadets Take Passage aboard the RFA Mounts Bay

See gallery for more information and Pictures

or click on link below

 Link    RFA MOUNTS BAY

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

For VIDEO'S Click on video link below  

     **************************

      See the Action      Geo Explorer

 

****   HMS CAMPBELL POEM ****

SEE HMS CAMPBELL PAGE

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                    

 

 

 

 

 

                              WELCOME TO T.S. CAMPBELL

 

 More pictures in the Gallery

T.S. Campbell, the Wick Sea Cadet Unit has just recently re-opened.  Please feel free to explore the site and if you are interested and want to get involved come along and join us on Tuesday evenings at the Scout hall, Wick.  Anyone interested in being an Adult Officers or Helpers would also be welcome.

WHAT ARE THE SEA CADETS?

The sea Cadets are boys and girls aged 12-18 years of age who are looking for adventure, rewarding experiences with strong links to the sea.

 
 

WHAT DO SEA CADETS DO?

All sea cadets receive instruction in a wide variety of skills. Cadets have the opportunity to get involved in many activities in and around Wick and the North Sea Cadet District.

 You can expect to take part in:
Canoeing, Power boating, Sailing, Windsurfing, Rowing, Communications, Seamanship, Engineering, Cooking, Administration, First aid, Drill & Ceremonial, Duke of Edinburgh Award, Offshore Boat work, Expedition Training, Physical Training, Shooting. The list goes on and on!

* See Link below for more information *

WHEN DO THEY DO THIS?

T.S. Campbell meets once a week on Tuesday  evenings from 1900-2130. Some activities may take place at weekends - Sailing, Camping, Competitions etc.

 

PAGES

     

                                                                              UNIT BOAT PROJECT   (updated)   

     ASC Boat project          NEW                                     

      UNIT HISTORY 

      Basic knots     **     Cadets Information     **     More Knots   

    *** Block and Tackle ***                *** Specialist Training ***              ***Rope Work***

      

     

     LINKS

     

     

     

    • ****---------------GAMES ---------------****

      ---------------- PILOT THE CRUISE SHIP-----------------

      --------SAILING--------

      -----SURFING-----

       

       

      The White Ensign

      White EnsignMOST PEOPLE appear to think that the White Ensign has been the flag of the Royal Navy from time immemorial, but it was not until July 1864 that the White Ensign really became the flag of the RN.

      For over 200 years previous to this date, the Royal Navy was divided into three squadrons, which were designated by their respective squadrons, red, white and blue. The red squadron ranked first, the white came next. Ships sometimes moved from one squadron to another and it was necessary, therefore, that they should carry three suits of colours to be able to hoist the correct ensign. The red and blue ensigns were not easily recognizable in the smoke caused by battles and could be mistaken, at times, for the flags of foreign ships.

      For this reason, Nelson, Vice-Admiral of the White, at Trafalgar, ordered the British Fleet to hoist the White Ensign, this being more easily distinguishable from the French flag. Collingwood's squadron would normally have worn the Red Ensign. Seniority difficulties regarding the admirals on the red, white and blue lists caused difficulties, but an Order in Council on July 9, 1864, put an end to the three flag system. The same Order in Council directed that the White Ensign was to be hoisted at 8 o'clock from March 24 to September 20, and at 9 o'clock from September 21 to March 24 at home and 8 o'clock or 9 o'clock, as the commander-in-chief directed, when abroad. Flags should fly until sunset, when they were to be hauled down. The ceremonial hoisting of the ensign has over the years altered a little.

      Old-timers will recall how in barracks a guard and band were always paraded for "Colours" but, now that bands are few and far between, this ceremony is going by the board to a great extent, although, of course, hoisting is always carried out with considerable respect. In Portsmouth Barracks, the ensign is hoisted at 8.30 every morning of the year.

       

       

       

      Measurements

      A fathom is 6 feet, the length of rope a man can extend from open arm to open arm. The rope was lowered into the sea to measure depth.
      A cable length is the length of a ship's cable, about 600 feet.
      A nautical mile is 10 cable lengths, or 6,076 feet.
      1 nautical mile = 1.1515 miles
      A knot is the measure of speed on water. One knot is 1 nautical mile per hour.
      A nautical mile is 6,076 feet.

      Port and Starboard

       

      Starboard for the right-hand side of the boat,

      Port for the left-hand side of the boat. 

       

      Red and Green Lights

      After dark a red light is carried on the port side and a green light on the starboard side of all vessels in motion. If you can remember that port wine is red, and that the port light is of the same color, you will always be able to tell in which direction an approaching craft is pointing by the relative location of the lights.

      When both lights you see ahead, 
      Port your helm and show your red! 
      Green to green and red to red, 
      You're all right, and go ahead!

       

       

    • : Why is a bathroom on a boat called the head?

      When On a Boat Be Sure to Use Your "Head"

      Head is a much used maritime word meaning the top or forward part. Head was also the name given to that part of the older sailing ships, forward of the raised section near the bow or forward part of the boat called the forecastle.

      So when someone said they were going to the head it meant they were going to the forward part of the boat. The sailors would climb down onto an area floored with a grating to relieve themselves. The grating allowed the open sea to help keep the area clean. The name has been largely retained among seamen, even in these days of modern toilets and modern flushing devices.