Image at right, and the additional 8 images below are from the Yale Peabody Museum collection, photographed 4 Apr 2015. Thanks to Larry Gall, a noctuid expert and Informatics Manager at the Museum.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 




Image sent to me by Andrey Zheludev, who renders beautiful photography of lepidoptera, e.g., slideshow.

This specimen from Guyana.
 

Image from Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. Label (partly obscured) indicates origin in Panama, collection April 27, 2009. View the image on the linked page: you can see magnified detail.
 
   
   
   
 






 Top and bottom views of specimen in Oregon State University collection, Photo by David Cappaert.
 



This and next 6 images from Coleccion Muller, Museo de Historia Natural, Ciudad de Mexico, contributed by Maria Eugenia Diaz Batres, Curator. 

Top view, specimen from Misintla, Veracruz.
 
 




Same specimen, view below.
 
 



Motzorongo, Veracruz, Mexico.
 
 





Mirador, Veracruz, Mexico.
 
 




El Vigia, Veracruz, Mexico.
 
 



San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico.
 
 


View above and below (next row) of specimen from Guyana, (c) 2013 Andrey Zheludev, among many beautiful images of tropical lepidoptera.
 
  
 





Image of moth collected at Nueva Segovia in Nicaragua, sent to me by Jean Michel Maes, Museo Entomologico de Leon.
 






Same specimen, view below. 
 
 






T. agrippina and J. Prosek, Suriname. Photo bKristof Zyskowski.
 
 





Kristof Zyskowski
 photo of same specimen. 
 



 Moth on light sheet, observed as part of a Survey of macro-moths in wet tropical forests around Piro Station, Osa Conservation, Costa Rica. Feb, 2015. Photos (and excellent detailed collection record) sent by by David G Larson (Augustana Univ, Alberta CA). Also pictured: Anne McIntosh.
 
  
 Image from Encyclopedia of Life WW page. Attributed to "Acrocynus" Costa Rica, June 10, 2011.  
 



Photo with permission from Robert Oelman (https://www.flickr.com/photos/roboelman/), from Ecuador. I rotated the photo for better display; the moth was actually oriented with wings pointed vertically (as typically).
 
 




Second image from Robert Oelman.
 
 Image from Encyclopedia of Life WW page Lithograph of Thysania agrippina probably published in 1897 for A Handbook to the Order Lepidoptera by W.F.Kirby).

 





White Witch Moth compared with a Black-throated Green Warbler, from Ohio History Connection blog.
 
Image from Encyclopedia of Life WW page.  By Natalie Obando, 10/23/2012, Rohrmoser, Costa Rica.  
Image from Encyclopedia of Life WW page. By Reinaldo Aguilar. Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica.  
Image from Encyclopedia of Life WW page. By Reinaldo Aguilar. Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica.  
Images below from companies selling specimens
From Flickr gallery, specimen from Suriname, April 2010, uploaded by Kristof and Yulia.  
From Flickr gallery, specimen from Suriname, April 2010, uploaded by Kristof and Yulia.  
From Flickr gallery, specimen from Suriname, April 2010, uploaded by Kristof and Yulia.  
From Evolua Homo sapiens site. Pretty effective cryptic coloration and form.  
 







Photo from Honduras posted by James Adams.
 
  

Links to Images below from companies selling specimens. Personal opinion (David Cappaert): Most entomologists collect specimens, and we all rely on the data recorded by the collector. By convention the insect specimen label tells at least: where and when collected, and by whom. For example for a specimen collected by Dan Jantzen (a pre-eminent lepidopterist), we know his T. agripinna was collected Dec 4, 1983 at 1800m elevation in Cartago, Costa Rica "3 Km S. Casa Mata, 16 Km S. San Isidro de Tejar." Further, if I want to see this specimen, measure it, perhaps sample for DNA, I can go the museum at which it will be kept, for the next few hundred years. At this point, this kind of data provides almost everything known about the white witch. 

Private collecting is less helpful - specimens are not part of a biological investigation, and may come with little or no "label data." On the plus side, a spectacular insect-like the white witch-may have some educational value; if I bought one and displayed it at my school, students would be astonished and excited by the physical proof that bugs can be that big! But I might rather have them believe that a white witch in a box is just a dead artifact. If you want to understand and appreciate it, you should travel to Suriname. In the meantime, Connecticut (where I live) is populated by a thousand equally interesting (though smaller) moths.


Specimen for sale at Butterfly Utopia. Indicated as from "Central America. Company offers "grayish" (here) and "goldish" (next image) varieties.  
Specimen for sale at Butterfly Utopia. Indicated as from "Central America.   
Specimen for sale at Esperanza Insects. Indicated as from Mexico.  
Specimen for sale at Insect Frames. Indicated as male, 8.5", from Peru.   
   

If you have can find very little information about an individual, you might learn something by researching his family. We're looking at the close relatives of the WW (info here), some pictured below. 


Like the white witch, Thysania zenobia, the owl moth, is a migratory species recorded across Latin America and as an accidental in the United States. Photo of T. zenobia from Colombia, emailed to me by Ariel Parrales Ramirez, Instituto de Investigacion de Recursos Biologicas Alexander von Humboldt

T. zenobia photo from Ariel Parrales Ramirez, Instituto de Investigacion de Recursos Biologicas Alexander von Humboldt  
T. zenobia photo from Ariel Parrales Ramirez, Instituto de Investigacion de Recursos Biologicas Alexander von Humboldt  
Specimen for sale at Insect Frames. Indicated as male, 8.5", from Peru.   











Thysania zenobia, the owl moth, photo from Dominican Republic on Butterflies and Moths of North America www site.
 
 



Many high quality photos of zenobia on the BOLD systems page for T. zenobia  Upper/lower side views of 2 specimens at right.
 
 



This and the following 4 image sets from a Noctuidae page of Philippe Thomas' images of neotropical moths of Guyana. At right, L. buteo
 
 


Letis scops.
 
 




Hemeroblemma  acron.
 
 



 Hemeroblemma  ochrolinea.
 
 


 Ascalapha odorata
- the black witch, is far better known and widely collected than the other near relations of T. agrippina.
 
 







Image from Alabama, USA, posted Jun 26 2012 on bugguide.net, Robert Lord Zimlich.
 
 


Mission Texas, USA image of A. odorata caterpillar, Mike Quinn, TexasEnto.net
 
 





Cameron County Texas, USA image of A. odorata caterpillar, Mike Quinn, TexasEnto.net
 
  
 





Ascalapha odorata 
image from a striking collection of Guyanan moth species. Noctuidae: Ophiderinae: Ascalapha odorata Linnaeus, 1758, male. Camp Caiman (Mountain of Kaw, French Guiana), April 1, 2011. Photo: Andres Urbas