Otto Langen Engines after 1867

 
 
Otto & Langen Single and Double Shaft Engines

Engines made in Germany after the initial "Fluted Cylinder" design - Post 1867

 
Serial Number 115
 
Horse Power 1 HP
Year 1868 - 1869
Current location Owned by the Danish Technische Museum in Helsingor - on loan to the Engine Museum in Grenaa.
 
Details:  This is the only known octagonal base 1 HP Otto Langen and the only early style known its original governor.  From the Deutz Archives, "It was  rebuilt at the factory July 31st 1878 and bored oversize from 220mm to 225.5 mm.  The piston was outfitted with 4 piston rings on its 2 grooves and sold to a customer in Dusseldorf.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Shown here on public display - April 2011 after thorough restoration
 
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Serial Number    361

Horse Power 1/4 HP

Year  1871

Current Location  Technische  Hochschule Aachen

 

This engine has suffered damage from a fall.  The flywheel on the engine is incorrect, Not to  mention the paint !
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
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Serial Number 379

Horse Power 1/2 HP

Year 1871?

Location - Dept of Mech Engineers Univ. of Nottingham
 
 
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 Serial Number   498

Horse Power 1/2 HP

Year  1871 ?

Current Location - Private Collection in England

This engine is of the second generation design with simpler improved construction. It is believed to be originally owned by the Deutz Corp and given to the Landesmuseum Fur Volk and Wirtschaft - Duesseldorf.  The museum either disbanded or lost interest in the engine and the Duesseldorf Town Hall acquired the engine around 1990.  It was sold in public Auction Nov 30th 2002 to a private individual in England.  Unfortunately, this wonderful example suffered severe upper column damage from a fall some time in its past.  This is one of the only privately owned Otto-Langen engines.
 

 

 

 

Serial Number   Unknown

Horse Power Unknown

Year 

Current Location - Smithsonian Institution

 This engine was severely damaged by improper operation while at the museum.  It been repaired but unfortunately does not have the physical integrity to been run again.
 
 
 

 

 

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Serial Number   743

Horse Power 1

Year  1873

Current Location - Deutz Corporation - Germany

This engine is complete and was restored to running condition by Deutz.  It is curently on display at a science museum in Cologne, Germany.
 
 
 
 
 

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Serial Number  

Horse Power Unknown - Probably 2 HP

Year 

Current Location - Technische Universiteit Delft 

 

 

This engine is on display in the Technische Universiteit Delft' in Holland.  It is badged with a tag reading  'E. Schenck & Cie a Liege'  This may be the largest double shaft Atmospheric engine remaining,  This engine may have been built in Deutz

 

The massiveness of this engine is demonstrated in the first photo when compared to Wayne Timms who is standing along side of it.
 
 
 
 
 
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Serial Number   1225

Horse Power 

Year  1872

Current Location - Fachhochschule Esslingen  (Esslingen College)
 
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Serial Number   1734

Horse Power 

Year  1874

Current Location - Deutz Corporation on display at their corporate training center - Pors, Germany
 
 

 

 
 
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 Serial Number   2165

Horse Power 

Year  1875

Current Location - Gesamthochschule Wuppertal
 
 
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Serial Number   2643

Horse Power 

Year  1877

Current Location - Deutz Corporation

 

This engine has been in the Deutz collection since it was built in the 1870's  It was displayed in the early years as a complete  original engine.  It has since ( sometime after WW II ) been cut away to show the inner functionality and mechanics.  This was made in the last year of production.
 
In the first photo you can see this engine ( when complete and set up as a running display) in the foreground of the Deutz engine collection.  Photo from the Deutz Corp - taken about 1920.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Serial Number   Unknown

Horse Power 

Year 

Current Location - Smithsonian Institution

This engine is owned by the Smithsonian Institution and is believed to be on loan to a Museum near Bethlehem, Pa
 
 
 
 
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Serial Number   2674

Horse Power 

Year  1877

Current Location - Deutz-Koln train station in Cologne. (Koln) Germany

 

This is a  2 HP  3rd generation single shaft Otto Langen mounted on top of a Granite Monument at the Deutz-Koln train station in Cologne. It is one of the very last Otto Langen engines built. 
 
 

 

 
 
 
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Serial Number   Unknown

Horse Power 

Year 

Current Location - Dresden

No details known about this engine
 
 
 

 

 
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Serial Number   ?

Horse Power 1/4

Year  About ?

Current Location - Holzhausen, Germany

This engine was at one time part of the Deutz engine collection,  It is now located at a museum  at Otto's birthplace, Holzhausen, Germany. 
 
 
 
 

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Serial Number   2697

Horse Power  1/4 HP ?

Year  1877

Current Location - Copenhagen

Owned by the Danish Technische Museum in Helsingor - on loan to the Engine Museum in Grenaa
 
 
 
 
Shown here after restoration while on public display April 2011
 
 
 
 

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Serial Number - 2411
 
Horse Power  1 ?

Year 1875 ?

Location  - St Louis Transport Museum

This engine was in the engineering dept of Ohio State University.  Sometime in its stay there they tried to run it and over charged the cylinder with fuel.  The resulting explosion drove the rack assembly through the top gear assembly resulting in severe damage.  The engine was later acquired by the St Louis Transport Museum, The engine is currently in storage and upon close examination appears to have  had a very rough life.  The slide valve system is severely corroded.  The water jacket has several pieces missing not to mention multiple cracks.  The top rack guide and cylinder cover have completely been torn from the main cylinder casting.  The governor and speed control system are only partially there. 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

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