Strategy



 
Problem:
 
 
The objectives of the WfW programme will not be achieved by simply cutting down trees in randomly selected places, but given the magnitude of the problem, requires the appropriate targeting of areas and species. There has been frank admittance from national office and regional personnel that projects have too often been selected for a variety of reasons, including political expediency and logistical convenience.  Such criteria do not contribute to the mission of the WfW programme (i.e. the control & prevention of IAPs).  This has been identified as a critical shortcoming of the programme, as it is thereby unable to demonstrate that it has used its funds to the most strategic effect. There is therefore no national basis for assessing the validity of selecting one project location over another. This raises questions about the validity/defensibility of the choices made on where resources are invested, both between regions and within regions in relation to the actual area targeted for clearing.” – WfW External Evaluation (2003)

 
Solutions:
  • Blanchard et al. (2015) developed a method based on plant traits (species aggressiveness & ease of control) to help prioritise control
  • Le Maitre et al. (2012) developed a generic species and area prioritization model for use in prioritising invasive alien plant control operations in South Africa using the following spatial data
  • Forsyth et al. (2012) published a peer-reviewed scientific article on their methodology
  • Le Maitre & Forsyth (2012) prioritised invasive alien plant control between quaternary catchments within the KwaZulu-Natal province
  • Forsyth et al. (2011) prioritised invasive alien plant control between and within South African National Parks protected areas
  • Forsyth et al. (2011) prioritised invasive alien plant control between quaternary catchments within the Free State province
  • Forsyth et al. (2011) prioritised invasive alien plant control between quaternary catchments within the North-West province
  • Forsyth et al. (2011) prioritised invasive alien plant control between quaternary catchments within the Gauteng province
  • Forsyth et al. (2011) prioritised invasive alien plant control between quaternary catchments within the Eastern Cape province

  • Forsyth et al. (2011) prioritised invasive alien plant control between quaternary catchments within the Limpopo province

  • Forsyth et al. (2011) prioritised invasive alien plant control between quaternary catchments within the Mpumalanga province

  • Van Wilgen et al. (2010) prioritised invasive alien plant control between the terrestrial biomes of South Africa

  • Van Wilgen et al. (2008) prioritised invasive alien plant control of primary catchments within each terrestrial biome of South Africa

  • Coleman (2005) prioritised invasive alien plant control between quaternary catchments within the KwaZulu-Natal province

  • Forsyth et al. (2009) prioritised invasive alien plant control between quaternary catchments within the Western Cape province

  • Le Maitre & Forsyth (2010) prioritised invasive alien plant control between quaternary catchments within the Northern Cape province

  • Clark & Lotter (2007) prioritised invasive alien plant control between and within Ezemvelo KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife protected areas

  • Roura-Pascual et al. (2009) identified and quantified the importance of key factors influencing the selection of priority areas for the management of invasive alien plants and proposed a standardized prioritization scheme for management at local scales, within the Cape Floristic Region
  • Coetzee (2001) provided mapping guidelinescompilation guidelines and a template for prioritisation within quaternary catchments

  • Cobbing (2009) provided examples of mapping and compilation for prioritisation within quaternary catchments