Teaching

I have had the privilege to teach several courses in Biology, Chemistry, and Biochemistry & Molecular Biology at the College of Wooster (see below for names and catalog descriptions).  I am teaching BCMB 331 and FYS in the fall semester of 2014.  For more information about the courses below (course syllabi, specific assignments, etc.), check out the course's woodle page (if you are a Wooster student) or contact me directly, if you are off campus. 


BIOL 201.  GATEWAY TO MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY 

This course serves as an introduction to the major concepts in the fields of molecular and cellular biology.  Topics include cellular structure, bioenergetics, metabolism, biosynthesis, photosynthesis, cell division and growth, and molecular genetics. In laboratory, students will learn specific laboratory techniques and will gain experience interpreting and communicating experimental results


CHEM 120.  PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY 

Fundamental facts, concepts, and theories central to chemistry are examined.  The topics include VSEPR, valence bond, and molecular orbital theories, intermolecular forces, solutions and colligative properties, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, equilibria (chemical, acid-base, aqueous, ionic), thermodynamics (enthalpy, entropy, free energy), and electrochemistry. The laboratory focuses on fundamental techniques, data manipulation, notebook and reporting skills. 


BCMB 303.  TECHNIQUES IN BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 

This laboratory-based course gives students hands-on experience with experimental methods used in biochemistry and molecular biology. It is organized around a semester-long project in which students design and work toward specific research goals. 


BCMB 331.  PRINCIPLES OF BIOCHEMISTRY 

This course focuses on the structural and chemical properties of the four main categories of biological molecules — amino acids, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipids — as a means of critically analyzing the functions of complex biological macromolecules and cellular processes at the molecular level. Structure, equilibria, thermodynamics, kinetics and reactivity of biological macromolecules, with emphasis on proteins and enzymes, are the course cornerstones. Principles of bioenergetics and intermediary metabolism (glycolysis, citric acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation) also discussed. Critical thinking and inquiry encouraged by analysis and discussion of current research literature. 


BCMB 332.  BIOCHEMISTRY OF METABOLISM 

A continuation of BCMB 331 with molecular and mechanistic emphasis on advanced cellular metabolism, metabolomics, signal transduction, as well as DNA, RNA and protein metabolism. Critical thinking and inquiry encouraged by analysis and discussion of current research literature. 


BCMB 333.  CHEMICAL BIOLOGY 

This course explores how chemistry can be utilized to examine and manipulate molecular events in biological systems. Specifically, the course is divided into different units, including proteomic profiling, enzyme activity profiling, metabolic engineering, and protein engineering. Critical thinking and inquiry encouraged by analysis and discussion of current research literature.


BCMB 401.  INTRODUCTION TO INDEPENDENT STUDY 

This course focuses on scientific writing, experimental design, and informational retrieval systems, including accessing and evaluating the growing collection of molecular databases. Students explore the literature related to their proposed senior I.S. thesis through a series of structured writing assignments that culminate in a research proposal for the senior project.  In addition, students learn the mechanics of scientific presentations and give a brief seminar on their proposed project. 

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