Wedding Reception Decorating Ideas Pictures

    wedding reception
  • a reception for wedding guests held after the wedding
    decorating
  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"
  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"
  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"
  • Make (something) look more attractive by adding ornament to it
  • Provide (a room or building) with a color scheme, paint, wallpaper, etc
  • Confer an award or medal on (a member of the armed forces)
    pictures
  • A painting or drawing
  • (picture) a visual representation (of an object or scene or person or abstraction) produced on a surface; "they showed us the pictures of their wedding"; "a movie is a series of images projected so rapidly that the eye integrates them"
  • A photograph
  • (pictural) pictorial: pertaining to or consisting of pictures; "pictorial perspective"; "pictorial records"
  • (picture) visualize: imagine; conceive of; see in one's mind; "I can't see him on horseback!"; "I can see what will happen"; "I can see a risk in this strategy"
  • A portrait
    ideas
  • A thought or suggestion as to a possible course of action
  • A concept or mental impression
  • (idea) mind: your intention; what you intend to do; "he had in mind to see his old teacher"; "the idea of the game is to capture all the pieces"
  • (idea) a personal view; "he has an idea that we don't like him"
  • An opinion or belief
  • (idea) the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about; "it was not a good idea"; "the thought never entered my mind"
wedding reception decorating ideas pictures
wedding reception decorating ideas pictures - Hortense B.
Hortense B. Hewitt Wedding Accessories Together Mr. and Mrs. Pillowcases, Set of 2
Hortense B. Hewitt Wedding Accessories Together Mr. and Mrs. Pillowcases, Set of 2
The history of Hortense B. Hewitt's excellence dates back 60 years. In the early 1940's, company founder Hortense B. Hewitt was at work in her New York apartment perfecting Glamour Garters - the original line of Hortense B. Hewitt products. After experiencing much success, Hewitt opened a showroom and set out to "clothe the feminine leg". Her claim to fame was sewing garters for the young Queen Elizabeth and her wedding party. With insight and initiative, Hortense B. Hewitt was influential in the development of the wedding industry as it is today. With this fascinating legacy as its backbone, Hortense B. Hewitt Co. has become renowned for its extensive line of wedding accessories and gifts. Hortense B. Hewitt is characterized by fine fabrics, exceptional quality, competitive prices and breathtaking style.

Munch, Edvard (1863-1944) - 1907 The Sick Child (Tate Collection, London, UK)
Munch, Edvard (1863-1944) - 1907 The Sick Child (Tate Collection, London, UK)
Oil on canvas; 118.7 x 121 cm. Edvard Munch (1863-1944) was a turn-of-the-century Norwegian artist, best known for his extremely personal brand of Symbolism, which helped lay the foundations for and proved a lasting influence on the later Expressionist school of art. Edvard Munch was born on December 12, 1863, in the small town of Loten, Norway, as the second of five children. His father was Christian Munch, a military doctor, and his mother Laura Cathrine Munch, nee Bjolstad. Edvard had three sisters, Sophie, Laura and Inger, and one brother, Andreas. Although ostensibly middle class, the family had but modest means and often struggled financially. In 1864, soon after Edvard's birth, the family moved to Kristiania, the capital of Norway (the city would be renamed to "Christiania" in 1878 and again to "Oslo," its present name, in 1924). In 1868, Edvard's mother died of consumption (tuberculosis) and her sister, Karen Bjolstad, took care for the children and the household upon herself. In 1877, Edvard's elder sister Sophie also succumbed to tuberculosis. These two deaths greatly affected the future painter and echoes of the pain and despair he felt at the time would appear frequently in his work. Although Munch was interested in painting since he was a boy, his family was not in love with the idea and urged him to acquire a more prestigious and profitable profession. In 1879, at the age of 16, he entered the Oslo Technical College with the idea of becoming an engineer. He pursued this field of study for little more than a year before deciding that his true calling was art and dropping out of the college. Soon thereafter, he enrolled for evening classes at the Royal Drawing School in Oslo. By 1881, he was studying there full-time. Edvard Munch was a quick and able student. At the Royal Drawing School, he was considered one of the most gifted young artists of his day. In addition to his normal classes, Munch also began taking private lessons with Christian Krohg, an established artist and good friend. He also attended the open-air summer school of Frits Thaulow at Modum. In 1883, Munch exhibited at the Oslo Autumn Exhibition for the first time. Over the next few years, he would become a regular participant. Munch was exposed to a wide range of artistic influence during his formative period, which lasted from about 1880 to 1889. The painter often visited Kristiania's (Oslo's) rather modest National Gallery, and had an avid interest in contemporary art magazines. Like most of Northern, Eastern and Central Europe, Norway was considered culturally to be a provincial backwater and, like many of his colleagues and contemporaries, Munch traveled extensively to learn from both the rich painting traditions and the latest artistic developments of Europe's enlightened West and South. In 1885, the painter attended the World Exhibition at Antwerp and paid a brief visit to Paris, then considered the Mecca of contemporary art. Munch was certainly familiar with the work of the Impressionists, whose large exhibition in Paris he visited that year and again in 1888, when there was another such exhibition in Copenhagen. Certainly, a variety of influences can be seen in Munch's work of the time, such as Maridalen by Oslo (1881), Self-Portrait (1881), Aunt Karen in the Rocking Chair (1883) and At the Coffee Table (1883). Conservative tastes reigned in Oslo at the time, and much of the painter’s work was poorly received by critics. At home in Norway, the artist was part of a group of radical young intellectuals, which included both painters and writers and espoused a variety of political views, from anarchism to socialism to Marxism. Their ideas certainly influenced Munch's own. However, the painter's artistic focus would always remain on himself and his own subjective experiences, almost notoriously so. Thus, he often re-visited the tragic episode of his beloved sister's sickness and death in such works as The Sick Child (1885-86) and Spring (1889). This latter painting delighted the critics and paved the way, in 1889, for Munch's first solo exhibition at Kristiania. That same year, he received a scholarship from the Norwegian government to study abroad. The artist traveled to Paris, where he enrolled at the art school of Leon Bonnat. He also attended the major exhibitions, where he became familiar with the works of the Post-Impressionists. His own canvases of the time show considerable Impressionist influence: witness Rue Lafayette (1890) or Moonlight over Oslo Fjord (1891), painted during a brief return to Norway. On the other hand, Night in St. Cloud, a dramatic and highly emotional work, has all the characteristic traits of Naturalism. In 1892, Munch visited Berlin, where he had been invited to exhibit by the Berlin Artists' Association. The painter's work was received very poorly, and the exhibition was closed down after only a few days, as the critics howled in outrage. Undeterred, the painte
Munch, Edvard (1863-1944) - 1893 Moonlight (The National Gallery, Oslo, Norway)
Munch, Edvard (1863-1944) - 1893 Moonlight (The National Gallery, Oslo, Norway)
Oil on canvas; 140.5 x 135 cm. Edvard Munch (1863-1944) was a turn-of-the-century Norwegian artist, best known for his extremely personal brand of Symbolism, which helped lay the foundations for and proved a lasting influence on the later Expressionist school of art. Edvard Munch was born on December 12, 1863, in the small town of Loten, Norway, as the second of five children. His father was Christian Munch, a military doctor, and his mother Laura Cathrine Munch, nee Bjolstad. Edvard had three sisters, Sophie, Laura and Inger, and one brother, Andreas. Although ostensibly middle class, the family had but modest means and often struggled financially. In 1864, soon after Edvard's birth, the family moved to Kristiania, the capital of Norway (the city would be renamed to "Christiania" in 1878 and again to "Oslo," its present name, in 1924). In 1868, Edvard's mother died of consumption (tuberculosis) and her sister, Karen Bjolstad, took care for the children and the household upon herself. In 1877, Edvard's elder sister Sophie also succumbed to tuberculosis. These two deaths greatly affected the future painter and echoes of the pain and despair he felt at the time would appear frequently in his work. Although Munch was interested in painting since he was a boy, his family was not in love with the idea and urged him to acquire a more prestigious and profitable profession. In 1879, at the age of 16, he entered the Oslo Technical College with the idea of becoming an engineer. He pursued this field of study for little more than a year before deciding that his true calling was art and dropping out of the college. Soon thereafter, he enrolled for evening classes at the Royal Drawing School in Oslo. By 1881, he was studying there full-time. Edvard Munch was a quick and able student. At the Royal Drawing School, he was considered one of the most gifted young artists of his day. In addition to his normal classes, Munch also began taking private lessons with Christian Krohg, an established artist and good friend. He also attended the open-air summer school of Frits Thaulow at Modum. In 1883, Munch exhibited at the Oslo Autumn Exhibition for the first time. Over the next few years, he would become a regular participant. Munch was exposed to a wide range of artistic influence during his formative period, which lasted from about 1880 to 1889. The painter often visited Kristiania's (Oslo's) rather modest National Gallery, and had an avid interest in contemporary art magazines. Like most of Northern, Eastern and Central Europe, Norway was considered culturally to be a provincial backwater and, like many of his colleagues and contemporaries, Munch traveled extensively to learn from both the rich painting traditions and the latest artistic developments of Europe's enlightened West and South. In 1885, the painter attended the World Exhibition at Antwerp and paid a brief visit to Paris, then considered the Mecca of contemporary art. Munch was certainly familiar with the work of the Impressionists, whose large exhibition in Paris he visited that year and again in 1888, when there was another such exhibition in Copenhagen. Certainly, a variety of influences can be seen in Munch's work of the time, such as Maridalen by Oslo (1881), Self-Portrait (1881), Aunt Karen in the Rocking Chair (1883) and At the Coffee Table (1883). Conservative tastes reigned in Oslo at the time, and much of the painter’s work was poorly received by critics. At home in Norway, the artist was part of a group of radical young intellectuals, which included both painters and writers and espoused a variety of political views, from anarchism to socialism to Marxism. Their ideas certainly influenced Munch's own. However, the painter's artistic focus would always remain on himself and his own subjective experiences, almost notoriously so. Thus, he often re-visited the tragic episode of his beloved sister's sickness and death in such works as The Sick Child (1885-86) and Spring (1889). This latter painting delighted the critics and paved the way, in 1889, for Munch's first solo exhibition at Kristiania. That same year, he received a scholarship from the Norwegian government to study abroad. The artist traveled to Paris, where he enrolled at the art school of Leon Bonnat. He also attended the major exhibitions, where he became familiar with the works of the Post-Impressionists. His own canvases of the time show considerable Impressionist influence: witness Rue Lafayette (1890) or Moonlight over Oslo Fjord (1891), painted during a brief return to Norway. On the other hand, Night in St. Cloud, a dramatic and highly emotional work, has all the characteristic traits of Naturalism. In 1892, Munch visited Berlin, where he had been invited to exhibit by the Berlin Artists' Association. The painter's work was received very poorly, and the exhibition was closed down after only a few days, as the critics howled in outrage. Undeterred, the painte