Math Program of Studies

Mathematics

The purpose of the mathematics department is to provide a sound, contemporary and comprehensive mathematics curriculum that offers each student an opportunity to realize his or her potential as a critical and logical thinker. The department strives to provide experiences that stress the concepts and skills necessary for success in today's society as citizen, student, worker, consumer, and provider.

The mathematics department provides a program of courses to fulfill the needs of students with varied interests and abilities. This choice of courses allows the student to be challenged and successful, and to approach mathematics with confidence. While we want students to feel challenged, we do not want students to be enrolled in a course that is inappropriate. In order to determine the best course, students should consult with their present mathematics teacher, their guidance counselor, and their parents.

All of our courses include investigation so that the use of either calculator or computer technology is an integral component. Students in algebra 2 and above should have ready access to a graphing calculator.

Below are typical mathematics department course sequences for students at Wayland High School. Students will be allowed to change levels throughout their high school careers if they meet the prerequisites for subsequent courses and/or have the recommendation of the teacher and department head.  The 2011-12 school year will bring a change in sequence for incoming freshmen.  This year, freshmen will be taking Geometry, followed by either Algebra I or Algebra II in their sophomore year.


Honors Program

The honors courses are deeper and faster-paced courses than the regular college courses, and assume a considerable amount of interest on the part of the student as well as a high level of performance. In general, students in this program completed Accelerated algebra 1 in middle school. Students in honors classes are generally expected to do formal proof, as well as reading of mathematics. Students in honors courses should expect daily homework assignments as well as long-term projects. Each year, they will be invited to participate in the statewide and national mathematics competition.

 

College Program

The college program is designed to develop the abstract reasoning skills necessary for students to succeed in college. Emphasis is placed on investigation, modeling real data, the characteristics of functions and problem solving. Students in this program should expect daily homework assignments as well as long-term projects.


Introductory Program

The introductory program is designed specifically for students who require a modified pace but who still wish to complete four years of college preparatory mathematics. Students in this program should expect homework several times each week. If they complete all four years, students in this sequence will have studied algebra 1, geometry, and algebra 2 (a requirement for admission in the Massachusetts state college/university system) as well as some precalculus topics.

 

Foundation Program

The foundation program is designed for students whose learning needs require substantial modifications to the regular course content and assessments.  Students are enrolled in these leveled, regular education classes and are fully included in all aspects of the learning experience except as required by their individual learning needs.  These courses require permission of an administrator.  Courses offered at this level are indicated in the previous chart.


6102  FOUNDATION OF MATHEMATICS

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required

This course is designed for students who are not yet prepared for an algebra class and who may need reinforcement of pre-algebra topics.  The course is based on the study of patterns in mathematics.  The course includes the study of integers, analyzing and displaying data, fractions, decimals and percents, irrational numbers and the Pythagorean Theorem, and work with graphing points and equations.  Students who have completed 6102 but still need reinforcement of pre-algebra topics can take 6103 Foundation of Mathematics 2 or 6104 Foundation of Mathematics 3.

 

6119  INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA

This course is designed for students who did not complete or who had difficulty in the algebra 1 course in middle school. It includes the solution of problems involving equations and inequalities of the first and second degree, systems of linear equations, the algebra of quadratic and polynomial expressions and the analytical geometry of the straight line. 

6310  INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 2

Prerequisite:  Algebra 1

This course is designed to supplement introductory algebra 1. It includes a review of linear functions and equations. Topics that are introduced include the arithmetic of polynomials, quadratic functions and equations, matrices, systems of equations, sequences, and series. 

6121  COLLEGE ALGEBRA 2

Prerequisite: Algebra 1

 This course is primarily a study of relations and functions, especially linear, quadratic, polynomial, radical, absolute value and exponential. Operations of matrices, complex numbers, and counting principles are introduced. Emphasis is placed on functions as models of real phenomenon. Graphing calculators are used extensively as investigative tools.

 6130  HONORS ALGEBRA 2

Prerequisite: B- or above in both Honors Geometry and Level 3 Algebra 1 or A- or better in both College Geometry and Level 2 Algebra 1 or teacher/department head approval. 

 This course consists of all the topics included in college algebra 2, as well as problems involving polynomial equations and inequalities, absolute value, radical functions, systems of linear equations in many variables, factoring, the algebra of rational expressions, sequences and series, and probability. Students who anticipate enrolling in BC calculus should be enrolled in this course.


6210  INTRODUCTORY  GEOMETRY

This course is designed as an introduction to the major topics of geometry. The topics introduced will include visualization, use of models, logic, the relationships among points, lines, and planes, the relationships in triangles among angles and sides, parallel lines and angles, circles, congruence, perimeter, area, volume, Pythagorean Theorem, similarity, polygons, and solids.


6220  COLLEGE GEOMETRY

 This course is a study of relationships involving points, lines, angles, and triangles in a plane. The topics include patterns, symmetry, and logic, the relationships among points, lines, and planes, the relationships in triangles among angles and sides, parallel lines and angles, congruence, perimeter and area, Pythagorean Theorem, similarity, trigonometry of the triangle, polygons, solid geometry, and analytic geometry including conics. Emphasis is on precision and logic in thought and expression. Algebraic skills are reviewed and employed throughout.


6230  HONORS GEOMETRY

Prerequisite: Middle school approval

 This course includes all of the topics in college geometry as well as extensive coordinate geometry and a strong emphasis on proof.  Algebra skills are also reviewed and employed throughout, and computer software is used.


6410  INTRODUCTORY  PRECALCULUS

Prerequisite: Algebra 2 and geometry

 This course is designed to complete the study of algebra 2 and begin the study of precalculus. The topics include counting principles and probability, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, polynomial functions, trigonometry, statistics, and conics.


6320  COLLEGE PRECALCULUS

Prerequisite: C+ or better in College Algebra 2 and department head/teacher recommendation

 This is an advanced mathematics course that prepares a student for university courses in mathematics. Primary emphasis is the study of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and rational functions and their graphs. It includes a review of arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. Parametric equations, and polar coordinates are introduced. Students who had difficulty with algebra 2 would probably find this course demanding and would be better served by enrolling in introductory precalculus. Students completing this course with a grade of A- or above may enroll in AP calculus AB in their senior year.


6330  HONORS PRECALCULUS

Prerequisite: B- or better in  Honors Algebra 2 or  A- or better in College Algebra 2 or department head approval

 This course is intended for students who successfully completed honors algebra 2 and honors geometry. Topics include all of those covered in college precalculus but in more detail. Also included is an introduction to the fundamental principles of calculus. Students who expect to take BC calculus must take this course.


6415  FINANCIAL LITERACY

This is an introductory level course intended for seniors. This real world applications course will cover general interest topics that all students should be exposed to in order to be mathematically literate in today’s world. The following topics will be covered: checking and savings accounts, credit, loans, personal budgeting, investments and taxes. Students will be able to think logically and critically about the many mathematical situations with which they are faced in our society. Students should leave this course with an increased confidence in their mathematical ability and be able to make informed decisions about many real life situations.  .


6420  STATISTICS AND DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

Prerequisite: Precalculus or teacher/DH approval

This course is intended to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The course will include normal distribution, data transformation, central limit theorem, statistical inference, confidence intervals, correlation, and regression. The topics from discrete math to be included are logic, recursion, and combinatorics.


6421  COLLEGE CALCULUS

Prerequisite: College precalculus or teacher/DH approval

 This course is intended for students who have an interest in having an introduction to calculus in high school. Topics include a thorough review of elementary functions, an introduction to limits, the derivative, and the integral. All topics are taught from a numerical, graphical, and algebraic approach.  Emphasis is on concepts and application.


6435  ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS AB

Prerequisite:  B- or better Honors precalculus or A- or better in College Precalculus or teacher/department head approval

 This course is comparable to a one-semester college/university course in calculus. Topics include a thorough review of elementary functions, limits, the derivative and its applications, the integral and its applications, and techniques of integration. All topics are taught from a numerical, graphical, and algebraic approach. In order to receive credit for this course, students are required to take the appropriate advanced placement examination and pay the required fee. Scholarships are available through guidance for students for whom the fee poses a financial hardship.


6440  ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS BC

Prerequisite: A- or better in Honors Precalculus, or teacher/department head approval

 

This is an advanced placement calculus course intended for the strongest mathematics students. It is comparable to a typical one-year college calculus course. Topics include all of those in AB calculus as well as convergence and divergence of infinite series, the calculus of polar and parametric equations and differential equations. In order to receive credit for this course, students are required to take the appropriate advanced placement examination and pay the required fee. Scholarships are available through guidance for students for whom the fee poses a financial hardship.


6540  ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS

Prerequisite: Seniors require B- or better in Honors Precalculus or an A- or better in College Precalculus or teacher/department head approval.  Juniors require an A- or better in both Honors Algebra 2 and Honors Geometry and teacher/department head approval

 This course is intended to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. It is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus based college course in statistics. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, planning a study, anticipating patterns and statistical inference. In order to receive credit for this course students are required to take the appropriate advanced placement examination and pay the required fee. Scholarships are available through guidance for students for whom the fee poses a financial hardship.





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