Norman N. Dow

 
  • Name: Norman N. Dow
  • Serial Number: 70098
  • Birth Place: Princeton, Maine
  • Age: 21 years
  • Residence: Bangor
  • Comment: Enl: NG at Bangor, Apr. 3/15. Dropped: Aug. 1/15; T. U. June 27/16. Reported for Federal Serv: Apr. 13/17. Pvt June 2/16; Pvt 1st cl. Org: MG Co 2nd Me Reg (MG Co 103 Inf) to death. Eng: Apremont (Toul Sector) Defensive Sector. Received citation. Overseas: - to May 10/18. Died of wounds received in action: May 10, 1918.


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Author Name: Kathryn Walker

Author Email: KATHYRNAWALKER@aol.com
Added: 28 Mar 2008

FIRST BANGOR MEN TO FALL ON BATTLE FRONT

The Bangor Daily News, Thursday, 16 May 1918

Two Soldiers of the 103rd Infantry Victims of German Poison Gas Shells - Gold Stars in Bangor Service Flags for Norman N. Dow and Kenneth Klein.


Of nearly 800 Bangor men in various branches of the country's service the first to die on the battle-front were two mentioned Wednesday as Norman T. Dow of Princeton and Kenneth Klein of Fort Kent, "died from other causes".


Although the residences are given otherwise, both were Bangor men. Norman N. Dow - not Norman T. Dow - had lived in this city for 12 years and Kenneth Klein was the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Klein of 37 Essex Street. Both were in the thick of the fighting, had been in the front line trenches several times, both in the 103rd Infantry and their deaths were caused by gas shells which have been hurled by the thousands against the American Sector.


Norman N. Dow was born in Princeton 31 years ago. His father was a civil war veteran and both parents are dead. He came to Bangor 12 years ago and had been in the employ of Swift & Co. until he left Bangor with the Bangor Machine Gun Company when it was mustered into service. He was a member of Penobscot lodge I.O.O.F., the Sons of Veterans, the Danforth class and Christian Endeavor Society, and his will be the first gold star in the church service flag. He was well known and held in the highest regard by many friends for his fine character, high integrity, gentle and cheerful disposition and profound regret is general. No better soldier ever went from Bangor. Three of his brothers have gone from their old home in Princeton and are in service. He also leaves one other brother and three sisters in Princeton and a sister in Seatle, Wash...(the rest of the article is about Kenneth Klein).


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