Other Works

vBulletin statAs well as the six non-Bony novels, Upfield wrote an unpublished novel without Bony, a booklet about the Snowy Rowles murders, a book-length biography, an unpublished autobiography, a play, and about 250 short stories and articles published in Australian and overseas magazines and journals including The Wide World Magazine, The West Australian newspaper, The Herald (Melbourne) newspaper, Walkabout, and The Australian Journal.

The booklet, the play, and about half of the stories and articles have been republished in the three anthologies listed below. Some of the more substantial articles in The World Wide Magazine and Walkabout are also listed.  


The House of Cain. Upfield's first published book is a non-Bony thriller. Austilene Thorpe is accused of murder but then disappears from gaol. Her fiancé, Martin Sherwood, goes blind from the shock. His famous brother, Monty, learns that Austilene is in a haven for murderers in Central Australia, and together they set out to find her. Follow this link to a map of Australia showing the location of this story (red indicator). Originally published in the UK and USA in 1928 and 1929 respectively, copies of those editions are rare and expensive. Dennis Mcmillan republished 1,000 copies in 1983 which now cost US$150 or more to buy. It was republished with Lulu.com in 2012, and copies can be purchased from the Arthur Upfield Bookshop.



Beach of Atonement. Arnold Dudley loves his wife and jealously murders her lover. He flees to a lonely beach north of Perth on the Western Australian coast. Almost driven to madness by remorse and solitude, he meets two women who strive to rebuild his life.  Follow this link to a map of Australia showing the location of this story (red indicator). This novel was was first published in 1930 by Hutchinson & Co but copies are now impossible to find. It was republished by Jan Finder with Lulu.com in 2007, and copies can be purchased online from this site.





A Royal Abduction is a non-Bony thriller. During a state visit to Australia in 1927, HRH Princess Natalie, heiress to the throne of Rolandia, is abducted from the transcontinental train at Cook on the Nullarbor Plain by American gangsters. They hide her in caves near Eucla on the Great Australian Bight until the search is called off and ransom is arranged. Follow this link to a map of Australia showing the location of this story (red indicator). It was was first published by Hutchinson & Co in 1932 but copies are rare and expensive. Dennis Macmillan republished 400 copies in 1984 which now cost at least US$400 to buy. It was republished with Lulu.com in early 2011, and copies can be purchased from the Arthur Upfield Bookshop.




Gripped by Drought. Frank Mayne, the owner of a 800,000-acre sheep station in western New South Wales, faces ruin after a three-year drought and a loveless marriage with a new wife who involves him in an orgy of entertaining and other spending. Follow this link to a map of Australia showing the location of this story (red indicator). This novel was first published in 1932 by Hutchinson & Co, and copies are now rare and expensive. Dennis Macmillan republished 450 copies in 1990 which now cost at least US$350 to buy. I republished it in early 2011 with Lulu.com, and copies can be purchased from the Arthur Upfield Bookshop.




Breakaway House is a thriller. Harry Tremayne, a policeman, goes to an isolated valley in the remote Murchison region of Western Australia to find his brother who had preceded him a month earlier to investigate the murder of a police detective. Do the gold smugglers at Breakaway House station hold the answers?. Follow this link to a map of Australia showing the location of this story (red indicator). It was first published as a serial in a Western Australian newspaper in 1932. A completely revised version was published as a book By Angus and Robertson in 1987, and I republished it in 2012 with Lulu.com. Copies can be purchased from the Arthur Upfield Bookshop.



The Great Melbourne Cup Mystery is a thriller. The horse that would have won the Melbourne Cup is killed and Tom Pink, rider of the murdered horse, tries to find out who did it. Born into the underworld, he exposes graft and blackmail reaching the upper eschelons of Melbourne society. It was written as a serial published in 1933 by the (Melbourne) Herald to coincide with the race. Follow this link to a map of Australia showing the location of this story (red indicator). It was republished as a book by Imprint, Sydney, in 1996. Try this site.





The Murchison Murders is the booklet about how the "perfect murder" was developed for Upfield's second Bony novel, The Sands of Windee; how Snowy Rowles used it to commit at least one, probably three, murders in 1929; how the crime was detected and solved; and what happened at Rowles' trial in 1932. Copies of the original booklet published by Bernard Cronin (not dated but in 1934) are very rare and very expensive. Another edition of 600 copies, published in 1987 by Dennis Macmillan, is now scarce and quite expensive. It is included in Up and Down the Real Australia available from the Arthur Upfield Bookshop.


The Gifts of Frank Cobbold is the biography of a Fijian trader turned surveyor who "became a sought-after and trusted station manager" in Australia, and made "a small fortune which he gave away." Upfield wrote this on commission in 1935 but it was not published then. It was edited by Sandra Berry and published for the Cobbold Family History Trust by Number 11 Publishing in 2008. Copies appear to be limited but try this site.






Up and Down Australia is my first collection of Upfield's short works. It has 33 short stories including the only known Bony short story, published with Lulu.com in 2008. There are humorous yarns, crime stories, comedies, and dire tales about the dangers of living and working in the bush. For more details, including a table of contents and the introduction, go to the Arthur Upfield Bookshop.






Up and Down the Real Australia is my second collection of Upfield's short works. It includes The Murchison Murders and 45 autobiographical articles, ranging from humorous outback anecdotes to personal experiences at Gallipoli and the Somme during the First World War, published with Lulu.com in 2009. For more details, including a table of contents and the introduction, go to the Arthur Upfield Bookshop.






Up and Down Australia Again is my third collection of Upfield's short works. It has 34 short stories, as well as a radio play and the first five chapters for an unfinished Bony novel, published in 2009 with Lulu.com. As well as more tales from the Australian outback, there are stories based on Upfield's experiences at Gallipoli during the Great War, and historical fiction based on "what really did happen" during the early years of European settlement and expansion in Australia. For more details, including a table of contents and the introduction, go to the Arthur Upfield Bookshop.




"Fighting the Dingo," The Wide World Magazine, April 1926, 441-446.

"Fur-Getting in Australia," The Wide World Magazine, April 1927, 64-70.

"The Land of Opportunity, Part 1," The Wide World Magazine, August 1928, 363-374.

"The Land of Opportunity, Part 2," The Wide World Magazine, September 1928, 492-498.



"Coming Down with Cattle," Walkabout, November 1934, 9-14. 

"A Visit to Lake Frome," Walkabout, December 1934, 44-47.

"Men, Sheep and Far Horizons," Walkabout, January 1935. Also in Bolton A.T. (Ed), Walkabout's Australia (Sydney: Ure Smith, 1964), 11-19.

                                "Hosts Hidden in the Bush," Walkabout, February 1935, 22-25.

"Patrolling the World's Longest Fence,"
Walkabout, March 1935, 11-16.

"An Australian Cattle Station," Walkabout, June 1935, 27-29.

"Trapping for Fur," Walkabout, September 1935, 25-30.

"Angling for Sword-fish," Walkabout, February 1942, 34-38.
                                               
                                
"This Jealous Land," 
Walkabout, April 1948, 38-42.

"Walking the Cattle," Walkabout, May 1948, 8-13.

"Pearling Town of the North-west," Walkabout, March 1949, 29-32.

"The Vermin Fences of Western Australia," Walkabout, May 1949, 17-20.
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