Staff Members

 

Dr Stefania Paolini
Senior Lecturer
Email
Staff website

Dr Paolini is the lab coordinator. She is a senior lecturer in social, cross-cultural and Aboriginal psychology in the School of Psychology. She completed a 5-year Bachelor of Psychology (social and organisational) at the University of Padova, Italy, and a PhD at Cardiff University in 2001. Dr Paolini's research is published on leading  international journals. Her research interests are in the psychology of intergroup relations and include stereotyping, prejudice, anxiety, emotions, meta-cognition and the self. Her recent work includes empirical research on the psychological consequences of negative intergroup contact (Barlow, Paolini et al., 2012; Paolini, Harwood, & Rubin, 2010), the affective and cognitive bases of cross-group friendships (Paolini, Hewstone, & Cairns, 2007), and the interaction between meta-cognition and stereotyping (McIntyre, Paolini, & Hewstone, under review; Paolini, Crisp, & McIntyre, 2009). Dr Paolini has supervised over forty research students from fourth-year to PhD and offers continuous research mentoring to former research students and junior academics.

A/Prof Mark Rubin
Associate Professor
Email
Staff website

Dr Mark Rubin is an Associate Professor in the School of Psychology. He received an MSc from the London School of Economics in 1994 and a PhD from Cardiff University in 2000. He has been awarded the University of Newcastle Faculty of Science and Information Technology’s (2014) Academic Staff Excellence Award, the Australian Government’s Office for Teaching and Learning (2013) Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning, and the University of Newcastle Vice-Chancellor’s (2011) Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning. He is best known for his research on social identity and intergroup relations, including research on perceived group variability, prejudice, and stereotyping. His other research interests include individualism and collectivism, interdependent problem-solving, migration processes, the need for closure, social class, and social integration. He has authored over 60 research publications, and his work has been cited over 3,500 times. For more details about Dr Rubin’s research, please visit his research webpage.

Dr Emina Subasic
Lecturer
Email
Staff Website

Dr Emina Subasic is a lecturer in the School of Psychology. She received her a PhD from the Australian National University (2004-2008) and has completed two post-doctoral fellowships (2006-2009) with Kate Reynolds and John Turner. In 2010, she became an ARC Australian Postdoctoral Fellow (and lead investigator) on a Discovery Project examining the nexus of leadership and change in social relations. Her research spans social, organizational and political psychology. A central contribution of her most recent work has been to articulate how social influence and leadership intersect with self-categorization processes to make such change imaginable and (therefore) possible.

 

Prof Miles Hewstone
Professor
Email
Staff website

Prof Miles Hewstone is Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Oxford and Global Innovation Chair in Social Conflict and Cohesion. He has published widely in the field of experimental social psychology, focusing on prejudice and stereotyping, intergroup contact, the reduction of intergroup conflict, sectarianism in Northern Ireland, and segregation and integration. Miles is the founding co-editor of the European Review of Social Psychology. He is a Fellow of the British Academy. Miles has received a number of awards, including, most recently, the Kurt Lewin Award (2012) from The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues and the Codol Medal (2014) from the European Association of Social Psychology.

Miles' recent significant contributions include research on longitudinal studies, extended contact, the secondary transfer effect, and effects of diversity. He has been actively involved in public policy input relating to improving intergroup relations in the United Kingdom, including The Equalities Review, Cabinet Office, the Commission on Integration and Cohesion, the Department for Communities and Local Government, and the Department for Education.

Dr Kylie McIntyre
Casual Academic
Email

Dr Kylie McIntyre is a registered psychologist and lecturer in social psychology at the University of Newcastle. She completed an Education Degree in Social Science in 1998 and has taught psychology within the International Baccalaureate Programme for 10 years. Dr McIntyre then completed a B Arts (Psychology) and a PhD at the University of Newcastle in 2010 under the supervision of Dr Paolini and Prof Heathcote. Her research interests include stereotyping, prejudice, and meta-cognition. Her recent work includes empirical research on the interaction between meta-cognition and stereotyping (Paolini, Crisp, & McIntyre, 2009) and a comprehensive meta-analysis of the stereotype change and meta-cognition literature (McIntyre, Paolini, & Hewstone, 2016).