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Installation

Dependencies


RoboViz requires that you have the Java JDK installed to compile its source code and a JRE to execute the compiled program. It is recommended that you obtain the latest version of the JDK before proceeding. RoboViz has been tested on Java versions 1.5 and 1.6.

Please visit Oracle's website for Java to get instructions on how to install Java for your system.

Also, please ensure you have recent drivers for your graphics hardware.

Disable Multi-Threading in SimSpark


SimSpark currently has some issues while running in multi-threaded mode. Without disabling it any input from RoboViz (such as initiating a kickoff or moving an agent) may cause the server to crash. These issues cannot be resolved by RoboViz, so you must disable multi-threading in SimSpark.

Open up the "spark.rb" file in the following directory where you checked out the SimSpark repository:

/simspark/trunk/spark/spark/spark.rb

In the spark.rb file, make sure any calls to setMultiThreads is set to FALSE and instead of TRUE:

simulationServer.setMultiThreads(false);

Once you have made the changes please recompile and install the SimSpark server.


Obtain Source Code


RoboViz is hosted as a project at SourceForge.net, where you may obtain the latest source code by accessing the subversion repository: https://sourceforge.net/projects/rcroboviz/

Checkout the latest code using a subversion client you prefer. For example, to get the latest version in the trunk:

> svn co svn checkout svn://svn.code.sf.net/p/rcroboviz/code/trunk rcroboviz-code roboviz

This will grab the most recent source code and place it in your current directory in the roboviz directory.


Compile


Make sure you are in the roboviz directory that contains the compile scripts (build-linux64.sh, build-linux32.sh, ...). Run the appropriate compile script for your platform. Scripts ending in 64 are for 64-bit architectures; those ending in 32 are for 32-bit architectures. For Windows, batch files (.bat) are provided that can be executed from within a command prompt or by double-clicking. 

For example, on Linux 64-bit:

> sh build-linux64.sh

After running a script, you will notice that a new directory has been created in your current directory, bin/<platform>/, where <platform> depends on the script you used. The contents of this new directory can be moved to any location you like; all necessary libraries and resources (textures, shaders, etc.) are copied into this new directory.
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