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UMass Graduation Rate and Academic Progress Data

Below are links to the most current academic data for the University of Massachusetts.
 
The first link is the Graduation Success Rate (GSR). The NCAA Graduation Success Rate (GSR) is designed to show the proportion of student-athletes on any given team who earn a college degree. The GSR was developed by the NCAA in response to colleges and universities who asked for an alternative rate that more accurately reflects the movement among college student-athletes. The GSR takes into account incoming transfers who graduate from a different institution than the one they started at and transfers who leave an institution in good standing. 

The Federal Graduation Rate (IPEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Department of Education and is used as an indicator of academic success for college student-athletes. IPEDS measures the percentage of first-time, full-time freshman who graduate within six years of entering their original four-year institution.

The NCAA developed its GSR in response to criticism that the FGR understates the academic success of athletes because the FGR method does not take into account two important factors in college athletics:

  • When student-athletes transfer from an institution before graduating and is in good academic standing (perhaps to transfer to another institution for more playing time, different major, or to go pro); and
  • Those student-athletes who transfer to an institution (e.g. from a community college or another 4-year college) and earn a degree.
The Academic Progress Rate is a measure introduced by the NCAA to track student-athletes chances of graduation. It is a term-by-term measure of eligibility and retention for Division I student-athletes that was developed as an early indicator of eventual graduation rates.  The baseline rate of 930 correlates with a graduation rate of 60%.  Penalties are assessed by the NCAA to any institution that sponsors Division I sports that fall below the baseline rate.
 
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Kim Callicoate,
Feb 25, 2014, 1:35 PM
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Kim Callicoate,
Feb 25, 2014, 1:35 PM
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Kim Callicoate,
Feb 25, 2014, 1:40 PM
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