Characteristics and practices of traditional healers and local drug shop personnel in the diagnosis and treatment of plague-like illness in Uganda


Plague is a highly virulent zoonotic disease that can cause bubonic, septicemic, or pneumonic illness in humans. Without antimicrobial treatment, more than 50% of bubonic cases and nearly all septicemic and pneumonic cases are fatal. Efforts to improve recognition, diagnosis, and treatment are typically focused on allopathic health clinics. However, a recent study estimates that 60% of the population in Uganda typically uses either traditional medicine alone or in conjunction with allopathic health care. Therefore, efforts are needed to understand the characteristics and practices of traditional healers and local drug shop personnel in the diagnosis and treatment of suspected plague illness. Qualitative research methods can provide an efficient and timely approach to evaluate general health care characteristics and practices.

Contact:
Christine Black, MS 2 - christine.black@ucdenver.edu

Mentor:
Kevin Griffith, MD, MPH
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