Student Travel Grants

Student Travel Grants

The Biometrics Working Group of The Wildlife Society is offering student travel grants of up to $2,500 for TWS student members presenting papers or posters at the Annual Conference of The Wildlife Society.

The purpose of the travel grants is to promote student interest in biometrics and the BWG.

Applicants must be students and members of The Wildlife Society. Preference will be given to applicants who demonstrate strong statistical or mathematical skills.

How to apply

To be considered, submit

  1. a cover letter requesting an award  (maximum 1 page) that explains your interest in applying quantitative methods to wildlife/ecological research;
  2. a letter of support from a mentor, advisor or supervisor; and
  3. an abstract of the paper or poster being presented at the meeting (formatted according to the meeting guidelines)

The deadline for submission of travel grants is July 30, 2016.

For more information or to submit an application, contact Rahel Sollman, Wildlife Fish and Conservation Biology Department, UC Davis, CA, rasrage2@gmail.com. Following submission, you will receive an email confirming receipt of your application.

 Previous recipients

  2016 Four applicants were selected to receive award.

Franny Buderman, Ph.D. student in the Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at Colorado State University presented a paper entitled "Mountain Lion Movement Dynamics in the Wildland-Urban Interface".

Kristin N. Engebretse, M.S. Student, Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia presented a poster entitled "Using Spatial Capture-Recapture Methods to Estimate Fawn Recruitment and Survival from Camera Data".

Alexander Wright, Ph.D. student, Department of Integrative Biology, Michigan State University presented a paper entitled "Long-Term Population Ecology and Large-Scale Movement Patterns of Gopher Tortoises in Southwestern Georgia: A Spatial Capture-Recapture Approach".

Sydney E. Manning, B. S. student, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University presented a paper entitled "Evaluating Fall Harvests with Practicable Wild Turkey Management Models: Incorporating Observation Uncertainty and Regulation Cycle".

 2015

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 Four applicants were selected to receive awards and three accepted while the fourth received funding from another source. The awardees are: Hannah Specht and Kelsey Vitense (both University of Minnesota), and Brian Brost (Colorado State University).

Hannah M. Specht, Ph.D student in the Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Biology at University of Minnesota, Twin Cities presented a paper entitled “Estimating Occupancy While Accounting for Detection and Availability”.

Kelsey Vitense, Ph.D. student in the Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Biology at University of Minnesota, Twin Cities presented a paper entitled “Uncovering State-Dependent Relationships in Shallow Lakes Using Bayesian Latent Variable Regression”.

Brian Brost, Ph.D. student in the Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at Colorado State University presented a paper entitled “Animal Movement Constraints Improve Resource Selection Inference in the Presence of Telemetry Error”.

 2014

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 Benjamin Augustine (Virginia Tech) and Brian Gerber, Brittany Mosher, and Perry Williams (all from Colorado State University) were selected as recipients of BWG travel grants for 2014.

Benjamin Augustine, Ph.D student in the Department of Fish and Wildllfe Conservation at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University presented a paper entitled “Accounting for Behavioral Response to Capture when Estimating Population Size from Hair Snare Studies with Missing Data ”.

Brian Gerber, Ph.D. student in the Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at Colorado State University presented a paper entitled “Predicting Juvenile Sandhill Crane Production from Ecologically-Driven Hypotheses Using Statistical Regularization”.

Brittany Mosher, Ph.D. student in the Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at Colorado State University presented a paper entitled “Confounding of Pathogen Detection and Host Presence Induces Bias in Occupancy Estimation”.

Perry Williams, Ph.D. student in the Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at Colorado State University presented a paper entitled “Population Dynamics and Adaptive Management of Cackling Geese”.

 2013

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Alex Cohen (Purdue University), Casey Day (Purdue University), Dana Morin (Virginia Tech University), and Beth Ross (Utah State University) were selected as recipients of BWG travel grants for 2013.

Alex Cohen, M.S. student in the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources at Purdue University presented a poster entitled “Modeling the Effects of Human Disturbance on Piping Plovers”.

Casey Day, Ph.D. student in the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources at Purdue University presented a poster entitled “Using the individual-based modeling tool SEARCH to simulate an American marten reintroduction in Wisconsin”.

Dana Morin, Ph.D. student in the Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation at Virginia Tech presented a paper entitled “Incorporating territoriality and foraging behavior in coyote space use models in the forests of western Virginia using relocation data and fecal DNA”.

Beth Ross, Post-doc in the Kansas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at Kansas State University presented a poster entitled “The importance of climate, predation, and density dependence in waterfowl population regulation”.

 2012

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Sharon Baruck-Mordo (Colorado State University), Adam Green (Colorado State University), Bryan Stevens (Michigan State University), and Andrew Tri (West Virginia University) were selected as recipients of BWG travel grants for 2012.

Sharon Baruch-Mordo, Post-doc in the Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at Colorado State University presented a paper entitled “A practical guide for use of home range estimators”.

Adam W. Green, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at Colorado State University presented a paper entitled “Optimal management of vernal pools to maintain wood frog metapopulations”.

Bryan Stevens, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University presented a paper entitled “Wildlife mortality from infrastructure collisions: statistical modeling of count data from carcass surveys”.

Andrew Tri, Ph.D. candidate in the Forest Resources Management Program at West Virginia University presented a poster entitled “Is harvest still a viable tool for managing urban bears?”.

 2011

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Luke J. Eberhardt-Phillips and Tabitha Graves were selected as recipients of BWG travel grants for 2011.

Luke J. Eberhardt-Phillips, M. S. candidate in the Wildlife Department at Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA, presented a poster entitled “Population viability of snowy plovers in coastal northern California”.

Tabitha Graves, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Forestry at Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, to present a poster entitled “Can we use opportunistically collected data to identify variables collected data to identify variables

 2010

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Orien Richmond, Elise Zipken, and Ben Augustine were selected as recipients of BWG travel grants for 2010.

Ben Augustine, Ph.D. student in the Biology Department at the University of Kentucky, presented a poster entitled “GPS collars and the acquisition of location data: A mechanistic model”.

Orien Richmond, Ph.D. student in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at the University of California-Berkeley, presented a paper entitled “Two-species occupancy models: A new parameterization applied to cooccurrence of secretive rails”.

Elise Zipkin, Ph.D. student in the Biology Department at the University of Maryland, presented a paper entitled “Multi-species occupancy models for community analyses”.

 2009

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The BWG awarded student travel grants totaling $2,500 to Christopher Bobryk and Jacob Ivan to attend the annual TWS annual conference in Monterey, California.

Christopher Bobryk worked as an associate scientist for an environmental consulting firm, where he observed first-hand the importance of statistics in decision-making processes that affected clients and other stakeholders. As a result, Christopher returned to school with an interest in biometrics and is currently pursuing a M.S. in Biological Sciences at Eastern Illinois University under the direction of Dr. Karen Gaines and Dr. James Novak. Christopher presented a paper titled “A spatially explicit model to predict white-tailed deer radiocesium body burdens on the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site.” Karen Gaines and Susan Dyer were coauthors.

Jacob Ivan has a M.S. in Wildlife Biology from University of Montana. After working as a professional wildlife biologist for The Nature Conservancy and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Jake returned to school and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Wildlife Biology at Colorado State University under the direction of Dr. Gary White. Jake has placed considerable emphasis on mathematical statistics and presented a paper titled “Comparison of methods for estimating density from capture-recapture data.” Coauthors were Gary White and Tanya Shenk.

2008

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Jacob Ivan and Thomas Bohrman were selected as recipients of BWG travel grants for 2008.

Jacob Ivan has a M.S. in Wildlife Biology. After working as a professional wildlife biologist for The Nature Conservancy and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Jacob has returned to school and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Wildlife Biology and Colorado State University under the direction of Dr. Gary White. Jacob presented a paper titled “Survival and population growth of snowshoe hares in central Colorado.” Gary White and Tanya Shenk were coauthors.

Thomas Borhman has a M.S. in mathematics. He is pursuing a Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Ecology at the University of Florida under the direction of Dr. Mary Christman. Thomas presented a poster titled “Modeling populations in natural protected areas: an extension of matrix metapopulation models.” Mary Christman was a coauthor.

2007

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Jacob Ivan, Chadwick Rittenhouse, Jamie Sanderlin, David Miller, and Krishna Pacifici were selected as recipients of BWG travel grants.

Jacob Ivan has a M.S. in Wildlife Biology.  After working as a professional wildlife biologist for the Nature Conservancy and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Jacob has returned to school and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Wildlife Biology and Colorado State University under the direction of Gary White. Jacob presented a paper titled “Using telemetry to correct for bias: a new approach to estimating density from trapping grids”. Gary White and Tanya Shenk were coauthors.

Chadwick Rittenhouse has a M.S. from the University of Missouri-Columbia, and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. there under the direction of Joshua Millspaugh and Frank Thompson. Chad’s work involves box turtles, and he has published three papers directly related to his work. Chad presented a paper titled “Resource selection by translocated three-toed box turtles in Missouri”. Joshua Millspaugh, Michael Hubbard, Steven Sheriff, and William Dijak were coauthors.


Jamie Sanderlin is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Wildlife Ecology and Management, and a M.S. in Statistics from the University of Georgia, under the direction of Mike Conroy. Jamie’s dissertation focuses on the central Georgia black bear population, and she presented a paper titled “Optimal genetic misidentification error estimation for mark-recapture abundance models”. Michael Conroy was a coauthor.


David Miller has a M.S. in Wildlife Biology from Auburn University, and is currently working towards a Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Iowa State University. David presented results from his work on mourning dove recruitment in a presentation titled “Towards range-wide estimates of mourning dove recruitment: initial results from a national harvest wing
collection pilot program”. David Otis was a coauthor.


Krishna Pacifici recently completed his M.S. thesis at North Carolina State University.  Krishna plans to continue with his education this fall as a Ph.D. student under the direction of Mike Conroy at the University of Georgia. Krishna presented a paper titled “Effects of vegetation and background noise on the detection process in auditory avian point count surveys”. Theodore
Simons and Ken Pollock were coauthors.

2006  -
None awarded.

2005

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Dale Tessin, Ph.D. candidate at Iowa State University, for his paper, “Spatial and temporal variation in waterfowl nest initiation and predation" (coauthors: William Clark, Philip Dixon and David Howerter) ($400)

2004

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Paul Conn, Ph.D. candidate at Colorado State University, for his paper, “A general model for the analysis of mark-resight, mark-recapture, and band recovery data under tag loss” (coauthors: William Kendall and Michael Samuel) ($250)

Debra Montgomery, M.S. candidate at University of Idaho, for her paper, “Estimating age of Rocky Mountain elk calves from morphometric measurements” (coauthors: Oz Garton, Peter Zager, and John Cook) ($250)


Mallard

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