5 Two Sources For Greenmont Quaker Plots


 Source 1

 
Source 2

Greenmont Union Cemetery
Two Sources for Quaker Cemetery Plots


1812
1813
1820
1820
1820
1820
1820
1820
1820
1820
1821
1821
1821
1824
1824
1825
1825
1825
1825
1825
1825
1825
1825
1826
1826
1826
1828
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1833
1834
1834
1835
1835
1836
1836
1836
1839
1839
1841
1845
1847
1848
1852
1857
1875
1923


1805
1811
1838
1840
1861
1865
1867
1869
1869
1872
1873
1874
1875
1879
1881
1887
1891
1891
1892
1892
1893
1893
1894
1894
1896
1899
1899
1903
1905
1907
1908
1910
1911
1911
1913
1916
1918
1923
1930
1935
1940
1952
1959
1966








There are two sources available for the Quaker burials in the Freeport, Ohio Greenmont Union Cemetery. The latest burial recorded in her publication for this section is 1966.  Both record sources can be examined (including the names) in Alice Hayhurst Morton’s “Freeport Township Cemeteries, Harrison County, Ohio."   

Source 1  marks the year of each burial as recorded in the Flushing Monthly Meeting Records for Freeport, Ohio and were located in the Greenmont Quaker Section 2. (a) Two early burials were Isaac and Elizabeth Cadwallader, who no doubt owned the property and lived there. (b) All the rest were buried in 1820 or later, which matches the second meeting house built in 1817. One document states they were using the new meeting house in 1819.49 Quaker minutes state it was first used in 1820. The sale of the 2.5 acres was dated Dec 21, 1820.  As often happens, use of a building is not unusual before final papers are drawn.
 
Source 2  marks the year of each burial  in the Greenmont Union Cemetery, Section 2 called “Old Quaker Cemetery.”  This list was compiled by Mrs. Morton. She told me her project had taken her to the cemetery to record all the markers that could be read. Again, we see two very early burials which undoubtedly occurred while still the original private property:
(1) Unnamed [Clark?],  died May 1, 1805, age 19 years, 6 months, 8 days;  (2) Sarah Green, daughter of Samuel and Ann Green, age 6 years, died 1811. On the old 1875 plat map, we see the owners of property in this area are Mr. Clark and Mr. Green, which matches the names of those two burials. It is appropriate that these two burials happened to be included in the December 21, 1820 land sale. The remainder on this list starts in 1838.
 
Mrs. Morton, in her cemetery publication made a note for the burials in Source 2 that “many of the graves had no stones and the older ones are hard to read.” We don’t know why there were grave stones in a Quaker cemetery, but in the mid 1800s and later, the changes occurring in our social history would include changes, also, in the manner of burials for this society.  It has also been suggested that as people were leaving the Society for more ‘personal freedom’ they began to erect memorial stones for earlier ancestors.

 
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