Introduction

Joe Leven has created an excellent website: Turtle and Tortoise Stamp Collecting, https://sites.google.com/site/turtlestampcollecting/. A search engine is located in the upper right corner of his site, just like on this page. A scientific name can be searched on Joe’s site to discover which countries have issued a stamp depicting a species of turtle. Only official issues are included.

Previously, we found examples of stamps on the website, A World-Wide List of Turtles and Tortoises on Stamps, http://www.personal.psu.edu/crr2/turtstmp/, cataloged by Don Riemer (1934 - 2012).  His site, which includes local issues, is no longer updated. Joe Leven’s site, which is a successor to Don’s site, lists new issues.  Our site, which includes cinderellas, is now archival.  Effective 2013, it will no longer be updated. 

Enjoy the diversity of turtle species depicted on stamps. There are separate checklists for species, subspecies, and extinct species. A page on taxonomy illustrates the classification used here. Species are classified by family in a directory to the family pages. Changes to nomenclature are reported in the directory, rather than on the species checklist. On the family pages an example of a stamp is provided for each species.
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Specifications:
An asterisk marks a species* that has a subspecies issued.

SC is for Scott Standard Postage Stamp Catalogue.

Parentheses signify a name change. The name identified on the stamp is given first, followed by the updated name.

Example: Clemmys (Glyptemys) insculpta, then relisted using the new name,Glyptemys insculpta.

Valid synonyms are indicated by the word or.

Example: Emys or Emydoidea blandingii, and repeated in reverse order Emydoidea or Emys blandingii.

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Hereafter, scientific names will not be italicized.

Thanks to Karin Rea for her skill with Photoshop.

James Rea