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Stadium Terror Legislation


Title: 2006 NFL Collective Bargaining Agreement
Date:
March 8, 2006
Source:
NFL

Abstract: (xiii) If, one or more weeks of any NFL season are cancelled or TR for any League Year substantially decreases, in either case due to a terrorist or military action, natural disaster, or similar event, the parties shall engage in good faith negotiations to adjust the provisions of this Agreement with respect to the projection of TR and the Salary Cap for the following League Year so that TR for the following League Year is projected in a fair manner consistent with the changed revenue projection caused by such action. In such circumstances, the parties agree to discuss in good faith the possibility of suspending the application of Article XXIV, Section 4(c) (NFL, 2006).

Title: NFL Exempt Fom Terrorism Lawsuits
Date: March 10, 2009
Source: USA Today

Abstract:
The National Football League and dozens of other companies and organizations have won exemption from lawsuits under a post-9/11 law that prohibits them from being sued if terrorists attack a site they are protecting.

The law, called the SAFETY Act (Support Anti-terrorism by Fostering Effective Technologies), aims to help security providers by guaranteeing they will not pay any claims that terror victims might file after an attack.

The law was created in 2002 in response to multibillion-dollar lawsuits filed after the 9/11 attacks that left companies afraid they would be sued if security equipment failed to stop terrorists.

The protection extends only to companies' services or equipment that the Homeland Security Department has approved as being effective in anti-terrorism.

Among those with top-tier protection is the NFL, which in December received liability exemption against future claims stemming from an attack at any of the nation's football stadiums. The law requires a court to dismiss lawsuits against companies whose products have Homeland Security's highest reliability rating.

The NFL got the protection after the government approved the league's nine-page stadium-security guidelines.

The benefit to the NFL is "fairly obvious," said NFL security chief Milt Ahlerich. "An attack from a terrorist organization could put us out of business." League guidelines, developed shortly after 9/11, include digital security cameras in stadiums, quick searches on entering spectators and barriers that keep cars and trucks 100 feet from a stadium.

Many beneficiaries of the legal protection are large government contractors that sell equipment such as airport X-ray machines and chemical sensors.

Among the other companies are aviation giant Boeing Corp., which got the exemption for its strengthened flight deck doors on planes, and IBM, granted an exemption for its software used to more accurately verify names and identities.

Homeland Security spokeswoman Amy Kudwa said the protection has led to "wider deployment of anti-terrorism technologies and services."

Another class of companies on the list is given a lesser form of liability protection — they can be sued, but the law limits damages to the amount of the company's insurance coverage.

The law requires all of the protected companies and organizations to carry terrorism insurance. The amounts vary (USA Today, 2009).

Title: Big Sis Set To Expand Spy Program To Sports Stadiums
Date:
December 29, 2010
Source:
Prison Planet

Abstract: If you thought seeing Big Sis urging Americans to “report suspicious activity” at Wal-Mart checkouts was creepy enough, you ain’t seen nothing yet. Homeland Security announced yesterday that the program was set to be expanded to include 9,000 federal buildings, as well as sports stadiums, businesses and communities in general.

Despite the official Homeland Security You Tube channel being bombarded by almost 6,000 profanity-filled comments from Americans outraged that their country is sinking into a decrepit Soviet-style informant society, Janet Napolitano announced yesterday that the “If you see something, say something,” campaign will be extended to include around 9,000 federal buildings across the country.

“In the coming weeks, “If You See Something, Say Something” public awareness materials designed to help America’s businesses, communities and citizens remain vigilant and play an active role in keeping our homeland safe will be posted in approximately 9,000 federal buildings throughout the country,” states a DHS press release. “Signage will appear at FPS guard stations at each facility, and any calls reporting suspicious activity will be directed to the existing national network of FPS call centers, which operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week.”

The memo also indicated that the campaign would be extended to sports stadiums, labeled “sports and general aviation industries” in the press release, as well as businesses and communities in general – so before too long expect to see and hear Big Sis reminding you that you live in a Sovietized police state wherever you happen to be.

“In the coming months, the Department will continue to expand the “If You See Something, Say Something” campaign nationally with public education materials and outreach tools designed to help America’s businesses, communities and citizens remain vigilant and play an active role in keeping the country safe,” states the release (Prison Planet, 2010).

Title: 2011 NFL Collective Bargaining Agreement
Date:
August 4, 2011
Source:
NFL

Abstract: Article 12 Revenue Accounting and Calculation of the Salary Cap

(xi) Cancelled Games. If one or more weeks of any NFL season are cancelled or AR for any League Year substantially decreases, in either case due to a terrorist or military action, natural disaster, or similar event, the parties shall engage in good faith negotiations to adjust the provisions of this Agreement with respect to the projection of AR and the Salary Cap for the following League Year so that AR for the following League Year is projected in a fair manner consistent with the changed revenue projection caused by such action. In such circumstances, the parties agree to discuss in good faith the possibility of suspending the application of the Player Cost Amount floor for the 2012 or 2013 League Year as described in Section 5(c)(v) below
(NFL, 2012).

Title: Secretary Napolitano Announces "If You See Something, Say Something™" Campaign Partnerships
Date: September 12, 2011
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Abstract: Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano announced new partnerships between the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) "If You See Something, Say Something™" public awareness campaign and several sports organizations and collegiate universities.  Partnerships include National Football League (NFL) teams, Major League Baseball (MLB) teams, the U.S. Open Tennis Championships (USTA), Ohio State University, and the University of Oklahoma. 

"Every citizen plays a critical role in identifying and reporting suspicious activities and threats," said Secretary Napolitano. "By expanding the ‘If You See Something, Say Something™" campaign we are working together to ensure the safety and security of fans, players, employees, and students."  

The "If You See Something, Say Something™" campaign -- originally implemented by New York City's Metropolitan Transportation Authority and now licensed to DHS for a nationwide campaign -- is a simple and effective program to engage the public and key frontline employees to identify and report indicators of terrorism, crime and other threats to the proper transportation and law enforcement authorities.

Over the past year, DHS has collaborated closely with federal, state, local and private sector partners, as well as the Department of Justice, to expand the "If You See Something, Say Something™" campaign and the Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting (SAR) Initiative—an administration effort to train state and local law enforcement to recognize behaviors and indicators related to terrorism, crime and other threats; standardize how those observations are documented and analyzed; and ensure the sharing of those reports with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)  led Joint Terrorism Task Forces for further investigation.

The "If You See Something, Say Something™" campaign originally partnered with the NFL in January 2011 during the Super Bowl XLVI, and is now expanding the campaign to the Arizona Cardinals, Baltimore Ravens, Chicago Bears, Cleveland Browns, and San Diego Chargers with digital and video materials displayed at each stadium.  Similarly, the "If You See Something, Say Something™" campaign partnerships with MLB began last season and has now expanded to the Chicago White Sox and the Baltimore Orioles.  The USTA has announced their partnership with the "If You See Something, Say Something™" campaign for a second year, and have displayed digital and print materials during all matches.         

Other partnerships with the "If You See Something, Say Something™" campaign have been recently launched by the states of Florida and Maryland, the cities of Baltimore and Newark, the Inaugural Baltimore Grand Prix, and state and major urban area fusion centers across the country. 

DHS will continue to expand the "If You See Something, Say Something™" campaign nationally to help America's business, communities and citizens remain vigilant and play an active role in keeping the country safe (U.S. Department of Homeland Security, 2011).

Title: New CenturyLink Gun Policy Riles Law Enforcement
Date:
January 16, 2013
Source:
Komo News

Abstract: Company officials say the decision to ban firearms at CenturyLink Field is a safety issue, but the move has touched a nerve with many local law enforcement agents.

CenturyLink management has decided that off-duty officers going to events at CenturyLink as fans can no longer bring guns through the gates.

That move isn't sitting well with many officers, who say bringing their weapons to events while off duty is part of their job to protect and serve, even as spectators.

On game day, more than 60,000 Seahawks fans pour into CenturyLink Field. Among the crowd are off-duty officers there to enjoy the game and, until recently, those fans were allowed to carry firearms.

Officer Erik Wickman is a member of the State Fraternal Order of Police. He said the decision was a tough blow and said he's dismayed there was no conversation before the policy was introduced.

In a letter to law enforcement, CenturyLink's general manager said the decision is in the best interest of public safety, writing, "We currently have an abundance of uniformed police officers working every event at the stadium and we feel that CenturyLink Field is perhaps one of the safest venues ..."

That explanation isn't good enough for Wickman.

"The reality is you can have all the uniformed officers you want, but the criminals will be able to identify them and avoid the areas where they are," he said.

The change comes after two unarmed and off-duty Bellevue Police officers were kicked out of the stadium last season for unruly behavior.

Many officers work in units that require them to remain armed at all times. The other concern for off-duty police is that they're recognizable and could be vulnerable during games, never knowing when they might see someone they've arrested.

While many officers are upset about the new policy, some civilians believe it's the right thing to do.

"I guess my first thought is that they should be required to do whatever the average citizen can do, and if the average citizen isn't allowed to take a concealed weapon in then I'm not sure police officers should be either," said Erica Rintoul.

The president of the Seattle Police Officers Guild said the policy is "misguided" and "insulting." He said department policy allows officers to use their discretion when to carry while off duty.

"From the moment we graduate the academy we have the tools we need to make those decisions and take action if necessary, and all of us -- without exception -- hope we never ever have to do that, but we need to be ready if it happens and when it happens," Wickman said (Komo News, 2013).