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Airport Attacks, Evacuations & Outbreaks


Title: San Antonio Airport Evacuated Over Bomb Threat
Date:
August 1, 2012
Source:
Huffington Post

Abstract: San Antonio airport reopened after a bomb threat. Police say they received credible phone threat. Search turned up nothing.

UPDATE, 5:46pm: San Antonio Police Chief Bill McManus has told WOAI that while both terminals have been cleared, the "all clear" has yet to be given.

UPDATE, 5:06pm: Airport spokesman Rich Johnson confirmed to The Huffington Post that the airport is working on getting buses onto the tarmac to keep evacuated passengers cool. Johnson said that some 20 flights have so far been affected as a result of the scare. The lobby of Terminal B has been reopened, Terminal A remains closed. Johnson confirmed that there had been "three hits" on vehicles in a parking lot and are being investigated at this time.

UPDATE, 4:47pm: Airport spokesman Rich Johnson told MyFoxla.com, "It is warm out here right now, so we're trying to get some water to some of the people. Inbound planes are being allowed to land, they're just being held in the tarmac area at the current time." Johnson added that emergency crews have completed a sweep of Terminal B and people are being allowed back inside; the sweep of Terminal A, which is the larger of the two, is ongoing.

PREVIOUSLY: San Antonio's International Airport was evacuated Wednesday afternoon following an apparent bomb threat, Fox 6 reports.

KENS5.com reports that both terminals were evacuated and passengers are standing on the tarmac. A "very specific threat" was called in around 2pm CST, WAFF.com reports.

My San Antonio reports that roughly 1,000 people have been evacuated from the terminal. 25 area buses have been sent to the airport to help with the evacuation.

Fox San Antonio reports that all flights are on hold at the moment (Huffington Post, 2012).

Title: World War II Bomb Closes Part Of Amsterdam Airport
Date:
August 29, 2012
Source:
CNN


Abstract:
A bomb disposal team rushed to Schiphol airport in the Netherlands on Wednesday after the discovery of a World War II bomb, an airport spokeswoman said.

A worker doing maintenance found the bomb at the bustling airport in the morning, said Antoinette Spaans, a spokeswoman for the Amsterdam airport.

The airport was partially closed as authorities determine how to deal with it.

"There will be consequences, the air traffic will be affected but we don't know how much yet. Passengers should check with their airline before coming to the airport," Spaans said.

The airport was used during WWII and suffered bombings then, Spaans said (CNN, 2012).

Title: Kenya Bombs Somali Airport Held By Militants
Date: September 25, 2012
Source:
Fox News

Abstract: The Kenyan military says its jets have bombed an airport in Somalia -- the last major city in the country held by extremist insurgents who are fighting African Union troops.

Kenya's military said Tuesday that its bombing of the Somali port city of Kismayo destroyed a warehouse and armory belonging to the Islamist militant group al-Shabab, which controls the city. Al-Shabab said on Twitter, however, that the three bombs which hit the airport didn't cause any casualties or losses.

Claims about fighting in Somalia are difficult to verify.

Kismayo is the main remaining stronghold of the Al Qaeda-linked al-Shabab. The group, considered terrorists by the United States and others, is waging an insurgency against the U.N.-backed Somali government, which is being bolstered by African troops including forces from Kenya (Fox News, 2012).

Title: Bad Joke Prompts Alaska Airport Evacuation
Date:
October 14, 2012
Source:
Fox News

Abstract:
The manager at Alaska's main airport says he expects charges to be filed after a bad joke led to the evacuation of a terminal.

Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport manager John Parrott says the incident happened a little after 12 a.m. local time Sunday, and the terminal was cleared as authorities searched through baggage. Investigators questioned a man who made reference to a bomb as well as his two traveling companions.

They figured out that he was joking, and needless to say, they didn't find it funny.

Parrott says he expects state charges and possibly federal charges to be filed against the man, but referred further questions to prosecutors.

The terminal was reopened at about 3 a.m. local time (Fox News, 2012).

Title: No Contagion Feared After Typhoid Scare At New Orleans Airport
Date:
October 15, 2012
Source:
NOLA.com

Abstract:
An American Airlines passenger who complained of vomiting and nausea, forcing Flight 1003 to be held for nearly two hours on the tarmac at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport Monday evening, is not believed to be infected with anything contagious, including what was first feared to be typhoid fever, city and airport officials said. "The passengers were released because neither the CDC, state or local officials believed there was risk to other passengers," said Ryan Berni, spokesman for Mayor Mitch Landrieu.

The aircraft left Miami at 4:31 p.m., bound for New Orleans, and before it landed at 5:27 p.m. a woman complained to the flight crew that she felt sick. The crew alerted the New Orleans airport, which dispatched emergency personnel to prepare for the sick passenger's arrival. Based on the woman's symptoms, airport officials notified the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Airport officials kept the remaining 145 passengers and six crew members on the aircraft until receiving clearance from the CDC to release them at 6:50 p.m.

An East Jefferson ambulance transported the woman to a nearby hospital. Her condition has not been released.

The aircraft was cleaned, was cleared to return to use and left the airport on its scheduled route with new passengers, said airport spokeswoman Michelle Wilcut. 

American Airlines passenger Mark Steffan said he was returning to New Orleans with his wife and two children from a family wedding in Key Largo when, 15 minutes before landing in New Orleans, the captain announced there was a medical emergency on board and asked everyone to remain seated.

More than 45 minutes after landing at 5:30 p.m., the captain made a second announcement, Steffan said, this time explaining that the CDC was taking a blood sample from a woman who feared she might have typhoid fever.

"He said we're all in this together, the flight crew, the attendants, everyone aboard this plane is in the same situation," Steffan said by telephone while he was still stuck on the tarmac. "It seems like they acted quickly, and so far everybody is taking it in stride. Everything is, I wouldn't call it jovial, but there hasn't been one outburst."

The captain made a third announcement just before 6:50 p.m., telling the passengers on American Flight 1003 that they were free to go but to be sure to wash their hands and to be alert for any symptoms.

Capt. Peter Lindblom with the New Orleans Fire Department confirmed there was an incident with the flight and that he sent two firefighters to assist.

Typhoid fever is a life-threatening illness, according to the CDC. There are about 400 cases each year in the United States and 75 percent of these happen while traveling internationally. Typhoid fever remains common in the developing world, where it affects about 21.5 million persons each year.

Symptoms can include a high fever, weakness, stomach pain, headache or loss of appetite. In some cases, patients have a rash of flat, rose-colored spots. Typhoid fever is contracted by eating food or drinking beverages that have been handled by an infected person. Typhoid can be prevented and can usually be treated with antibiotics (NOLA.com, 2012).

Title: Flights Canceled At Japanese Airport After Unexploded Shell Discovered
Date:
October 30, 2012
Source:
CNN


Abstract:
Dozens of flights were canceled in and out of a northeastern Japanese city on Tuesday after construction workers came across an unexploded shell believed to be from World War II buried near a taxiway.

Airport authorities in Sendai said they had canceled all 92 flights, national and international, scheduled to use the airport Tuesday after the discovery of the shell late Monday under an unpaved area beside the taxiway.

Members of the Japanese Self Defense Force are working to remove the ordinance, which is thought to be a U.S.-made bomb dropped during World War II, the airport said, adding that officials hope flights will be able to resume Wednesday.

The device still has a fuse, which raises the risk that it could explode, and is approximately 110 centimeters (43 inches) long and 35 centimeters wide, authorities said.

Sendai is still recovering and rebuilding after the devastating earthquake and tsunami that killed thousands of people and caused widespread destruction across northeastern Japan in March 2011.

The city is the largest in the region of Tohoku, which bore the brunt of the natural disasters. The damage to its airport was widely documented in images that emerged in the aftermath of the quake and tsunami (CNN, 2012).

Title: Driver Shot Near Bob Hope Airport In Burbank
Date:
November 2, 2012
Source:
KTLA News

Abstract:
Police in Burbank are trying to figure out what happened after a man claimed he was shot on the 5 Freeway early Friday.

Investigators say they believe the victim's version of events is false, and that the shooting didn't actually happen on the freeway.

The driver of a silver Mercedes coupe told police he was fired upon while driving in the northbound lanes of the 5 Freeway.

The victim, described only as a Hispanic male, was taken to an area hospital with what were described as non-life-threatening injuries.

He was apparently speeding down Hollywood way, near the
Bob Hope Airport, when airport police pulled him over and noticed he had been shot.

But Burbank police believe the shooting actually happened in the 1800 block of Landis Street, about a half-mile from the airport.

Authorities received multiple 911 calls around 2:15 a.m. reporting the shooting.

"It does not appear that the shooting occurred up on the freeway," Burbank police Lt. JJ Puglisi said.

"The initial information was that it occurred on the freeway, but since that time we've discovered evidence that it most likely occurred in the Morgan and Landis area."

The investigation is ongoing. Check back for updates on this developing story (KTLA News, 2012).

Title: Bomb From WWII Safely Removed From Japan Airport
Date:
  November 13, 2012
Source:
Fox News


Abstract:
A military squad has safely removed a 550 pound (250-kilogram) World War II bomb found two weeks ago near the runway of a major airport in northern Japan.

The team defused the rusty bomb Wednesday and then transported it away from Sendai Airport. More than 30 flights were canceled while they worked.

Sendai Airport was heavily damaged by last year's tsunami and the bomb was uncovered in construction related to its restoration. The airport was immediately closed, but troops piled hundreds of sandbags around the bomb so that flights could resume the next day.

The airport was closed again Wednesday morning as the bomb was removed.

The United States heavily bombed Japanese cities during World War II, and finding unexploded bombs is not unusual, even 67 years after Japan's surrender (Fox News, 2012).

Title: Man Claiming He Has Dynamite Causes Miami Airport Terminal To Be Temporarily Evacuated
Date:
November 26, 2012
Source:
Fox News

Abstract: Officials say Miami International Airport has returned to normal operations after a man claimed to have dynamite in his luggage.

Miami-Dade police say Concourse J was partially evacuated Monday afternoon, shortly after the luggage was flagged at a TACA Airlines ticket counter. Bomb squad officers searched the bag but found no explosives.

Police say the suspect was detained and later recanted his statement about having dynamite. His name wasn't immediately released.

An airport spokesman told The Miami Herald (http://hrld.us/U87YT6 ) that the security threat investigation delayed one outgoing Avianca Airlines flight by an hour. Some arriving international arrivals were also delayed because of the evacuation (Fox News, 2012).

Title: NFL Player Accused Of Having Gun At N.Y. Airport
Date:
February 19, 2013
Source:
CNN

Abstract: A defensive end for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers was arraigned late Monday night after being accused of having a semiautomatic weapon in his suitcase at New York's LaGuardia Airport, according to the Queens District Attorney's Office.

Da'Quan Bowers, 22, was charged with second-degree criminal possession by Judge Toko Serita in New York Criminal Court late Monday night, according to Meris Campbell of the Queens District Attorney's Office.

Bail was set at $10,000, Campbell said. Video recorded outside the courthouse Monday night showed Bowers getting into a car and driving away after the arraignment.

Bowers was arrested at an airport ticket counter with a .40-caliber handgun, according to Rudy King, a spokesperson for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which runs the airport.

Campbell said there were no bullets in the gun, but there were bullets near the gun in a separate location. According to New York firearms law, if bullets are found next to the weapon, it is considered loaded, Campbell said.

Bowers was headed to North Carolina and was flying on US Airways, Campbell said.

In a statement CNN obtained from the Tampa Bay Buccaneers Monday, General Manager Mark Dominik said: "We are aware of the situation and are gathering information. We will withhold comment until we know all the facts."

Calls were not immediately returned Monday from Bowers' defense attorney, Dennis Coppin.

Campbell said that if bail is posted, Bowers will be able to leave New York if he chooses. His next court date is April 25.

It was unclear Monday night whether Bowers had a permit for the gun (CNN, 2013).

Title: Boy, 10, Killed By Falling Sign At Alabama Airport
Date:
March 22, 2012
Source:
Reuters

Abstract: A falling sign killed a 10-year-old boy at a recently renovated airport near Birmingham, Alabama, on Friday and injured several other people including the boy's mother, authorities said.

Luke Bresette, 10, of Overland Park, Kansas, was pronounced dead by the Jefferson County Coroner's office, following the incident at the Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport. Confirmation of the identities of the others reported injured was not immediately available.

The Birmingham News reported that Bresette was traveling with his parents and three brothers. His mother, identified as Heather Bresette, and the three brothers, were taken to the UAB Hospital and Children's Hospital in Birmingham for treatment.

A spokeswoman at UAB Hospital said Heather Bresette was "under evaluation," but declined to give further information. A Children's Hospital spokeswoman said they do not have any information about anyone named Bresette.

The Birmingham News said the family was waiting for a connecting flight at the time of the accident.

Officers from the Birmingham Police Department responded to a call for medical assistance at the airport, shortly after 1:30 p.m. local time (1830 GMT), police spokesman Sergeant Johnny Williams said.

"Medical staff from the fire department responded and transported the injured people to hospitals. It is our understanding that some type of sign or display did fall, injuring some people," Williams said.

Calls to Birmingham-Shuttlesworth airport, which reopened a terminal on March 13 after a refurbishment, and to the Birmingham Fire and Rescue Battalion were not immediately returned (Reuters, 2012).

Title: Boy, 10, Killed By Falling Sign At Alabama Airport
Date:
March 22, 2012
Source:
Reuters

Abstract: A falling sign killed a 10-year-old boy at a recently renovated airport near Birmingham, Alabama, on Friday and injured several other people including the boy's mother, authorities said.

Luke Bresette, 10, of Overland Park, Kansas, was pronounced dead by the Jefferson County Coroner's office, following the incident at the Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport. Confirmation of the identities of the others reported injured was not immediately available.

The Birmingham News reported that Bresette was traveling with his parents and three brothers. His mother, identified as Heather Bresette, and the three brothers, were taken to the UAB Hospital and Children's Hospital in Birmingham for treatment.

A spokeswoman at UAB Hospital said Heather Bresette was "under evaluation," but declined to give further information. A Children's Hospital spokeswoman said they do not have any information about anyone named Bresette.

The Birmingham News said the family was waiting for a connecting flight at the time of the accident.

Officers from the Birmingham Police Department responded to a call for medical assistance at the airport, shortly after 1:30 p.m. local time (1830 GMT), police spokesman Sergeant Johnny Williams said.

"Medical staff from the fire department responded and transported the injured people to hospitals. It is our understanding that some type of sign or display did fall, injuring some people," Williams said.

Calls to Birmingham-Shuttlesworth airport, which reopened a terminal on March 13 after a refurbishment, and to the Birmingham Fire and Rescue Battalion were not immediately returned (Reuters, 2012).