New to Scouting - Help !




INFORMATION FOR NEW KIDS JOINING THE TROOP




I HAVE DECIDED TO JOIN TROOP 442. WHAT DO I DO NOW?

Just come to the next troop meeting. These are held on the 1st and 3rd Monday of each month, 7:30pm, at the King of Glory Church.  You will then meet with the Scoutmaster to review the basics of the Scout Rank, go over any questions about uniforms, equipment, or fees.  You will then join in with the troop activities.  A scout health form will need to be filled out and signed by your parent/guardian prior to your first camping trip.  



WHAT IS THE TROOP UNIFORM

The Boy Scout uniform consists of a green scout shirt, scout pants (long), scout belt, sash, and lanyard.  The first four can be purchased at the scout store (1211 East Dyer Road, Santa Ana 714-979-4554).   The lanyard is given to you by the troop and used instead of a neckerchief.  You will receive beads to thread onto your lanyard for various camps and service projects.  We do not use scout hats.



WHAT DO I NEED TO BUY

You will need to buy a uniform and scout handbook.  For camping you will need a sleeping bag, sleeping pad, and backpack.  Other smaller items are listed on the “10 essentials” sheet. Tents and cooking gear are provided by the troop.  One of the nice things about Troop 442 is our well stocked trailer with abundant gear available.



WHAT IS THE SCOUT HANDBOOK

This book contains details about rank advancement as well as the key scouting skills. All the basics of first aid, navigation, and wilderness survival are in there, plus lots of other information.  The book is also used to check off achievements which will be needed for rank advancement.



HOW WILL I LEARN TO USE THE GEAR, BACKPACK, TENT ETC.

This will all be taught in your first month or two with the troop.  During troop meetings new scouts work with the adult leaders and older scouts to build up their basic skills.



WHEN ARE TROOP MEETINGS

We meet for one hour twice a month, on the 1st and 3rd Monday. Meetings start promptly at 7:30pm.



WHAT DO WE DO AT TROOP MEETINGS

At 7:30 the troop is called to attention for a flag ceremony. The Scoutmaster then makes announcements about upcoming events such as camps, service projects, and hikes.  The Senior Patrol Leader then leads the scouts through skill training, such as compass work, first aid, or ropes/lashings.  This will be followed by an activity that uses these skills and/or a game.  At 8:25 the scouts circle up and do a closing ceremony.  Everyone leaves by 8:30pm.



WHEN ARE CAMPING TRIPS AND HOW DO THEY WORK

Camps are offered about once a month and are almost always within 2 hours driving distance.  Occasionally a hike will be done instead of a camp.  In general, scouts meet in the parking lot of the King of Glory Church on Saturday morning with their packs, sleeping bags, and essentials.  The troop will then check gear and grab any needed supplies from our Troop trailer (tents, stoves, cooking gear, etc.).  Scouts are then loaded with their gear into the cars and we drive to camp.  At the campsite we will drop the off the gear and set up tents.  We occasionally backpack in, but there is usually parking near the campsites.

Saturday is then spent hiking and exploring, with skill training worked into the program.  New scouts can learn and get checked off on basic skills for rank advancement.  Lunch is provided by the troop.  In the late afternoon, scouts will prepare the dinner meal.  There is then time for games and a campfire.

Sunday morning scouts prepare breakfast for the troop.  We then clean up the campsite and drive home, generally returning to the King of Glory parking lot by noon.



WHAT ARE SERVICE PROJECTS

Part of scouting is providing service to the community.  Several times a year we meet for a day (usually Saturday) and do volunteer work.  This might be wetland conservation, forestry work planting saplings, loading popcorn boxes at the distribution center, or flag planting around Memorial Day.



WHAT IS ADVANCEMENT

Moving through the ranks is advancement.  You will start at the scout rank, and progress through second class, first class, star, life, and eagle.  Advancement has four steps through each award level. First, the scout learns. This learning comes during activities at troop meetings and camps, as well as by reviewing the scout handbook. Second, the scout is tested. The specific requirements determine the kind of testing, either verbally or by demonstration. This can be done by a higher ranking scout or an adult leader. Third, the scout is reviewed. The purpose of the review is to ensure that all requirements for advancement have been met, including positive attitude and living by the ideals of scouting. Fourth, the scout is recognized. This final step in involves presentation of the badge, usually at a ceremony before the entire Troop (Court of Honor).  These ceremonies are held 3-4 times per year.  See the attached rank page for a list of all the scout ranks and what their patches looks like.



HOW DO MERIT BADGES WORK

Merit badges give scouts the opportunity to investigate around 120 different areas of knowledge and skills. The merit badge program plays a major role in the scouting advancement program and participation can begin as soon as a scout registers with a troop. Each scout can explore topics from American Business to Woodworking as he has interest. Badges can be earned using counselors/instructors in the troop (see troop442.org), at designated merit badge days held on weekends, using designated BSA counselors from the district, or at Summer Camp.  Just ask one of the 442 adult leaders if you need help getting started and they will point you in the right direction.  The badges themselves are awarded at the quarterly Court of Honor, and are then sewn onto your sash. You will need 21 merit badges to obtain the Eagle rank.  The website meritbadge.org us useful and lists all the badges and requirements.



HOW TO I FIND OUT ABOUT UPCOMING EVENTS, CAMPS, AND MEETINGS

These are announced at troop meetings.  The information will also be posted on the troop442.org website.  The Senior Patrol Leader will also call / text / email if there is a change or important event.







SCOUT RANKS, LISTED IN ORDER


Scout. The Scout rank is the first rank of Boy Scouts.  To complete the rank, a new Scout must complete a Boy Scout application and join a Troop.  He must also be able to repeat the Pledge of Allegiance, demonstrate the Scout sign, salute and handshake, tie a square knot, and describe the Scout badge.  Finally, he must understand and agree to live by the Scout Oath, Law, Motto, Slogan, and the Outdoor Code.


Tenderfoot. Tenderfoot is the second rank of Boy Scouts.  A Scout can complete requirements for any other rank in virtually any order, but the ranks must be earned in sequence (Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle).  To earn the Tenderfoot rank, a Scout must complete requirements dealing with camping, hiking, the American Flag, the Scout Oath, Law, Motto, and Slogan, the patrol method, the buddy system, physical fitness, plants, and first aid.

Second Class. Second Class is the third rank of Boy Scouts.  A Scout can complete requirements for any other rank in virtually any order, but the ranks must be earned in sequence (Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle).  To earn the Second Class rank, a Scout must complete requirements dealing with orienteering, camping, wood tools, cooking, a flag ceremony, a service project, wildlife, first aid, swimming, drug and alcohol prevention, and personal safety.

First Class. First Class is the fourth rank of Boy Scouts.  A Scout can complete requirements for any other rank in virtually any order, but the ranks must be earned in sequence (Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle).  To earn the First Class rank, a Scout must complete requirements dealing with orienteering, camping, cooking, constitutional rights, plants, knots, lashings, swimming, recruitment, and the internet.

Star. Star is the fifth rank of Boy Scouts.  A Scout can complete requirements for any other rank in virtually any order, but the ranks must be earned in sequence (Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle).  The requirements for the Star rank are much different than the previous ranks.  To earn the Star rank, a Scout must be active in their Troop and Patrol for at least 4 months after earning First Class, earn 6 merit badges, including 4 from those required for Eagle, complete service projects totaling at least 6 hours of work, and serve in a leadership position in the Troop for at least 4 months.

Life. Life is the sixth rank of Boy Scouts.  A Scout can complete requirements for any other rank in virtually any order, but the ranks must be earned in sequence (Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle).  The requirements for the Life rank are similar to those of the Star rank.  To earn the Life rank, a Scout must be active in their Troop and Patrol for at least 6 months after earning Star, earn 5 additional merit badges beyond those earned for Star (total of 11), including 3 more from those required for Eagle, complete service projects totaling at least 6 hours of work, and serve in a leadership position in the Troop for at least 6 months.

Eagle. Eagle is the seventh and highest rank of Boy Scouts.  A Scout can complete requirements for any other rank in virtually any order, but the ranks must be earned in sequence (Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle).  To earn the Eagle rank, a Scout must be active in their Troop and Patrol for at least 6 months after earning Life, earn a total of 21 merit badges, including 12 required merit badges (First Aid, Citizenship in the Community, Citizenship in the Nation, Citizenship in the World, Communications, Personal Fitness, Emergency Preparedness OR Lifesaving, Environmental Science, Personal Management, Swimming OR Hiking OR Cycling, Camping, and Family Life), serve in a leadership position in the Troop for at least 6 months, and complete an Eagle Scout service project which is helpful to any religious institution, school, or community.





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