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[IMAGE] THE 325C. 230. Early Monastic Sources.
Sr. Mary Forman, OSB, PhD.

Studies 10 major early monastic works, which represent some of the fathers to whom Benedict refers in the last chapter of his Rule. These are the texts which shape the thought and lives of monastic men and women over the centuries. For each of the 10 works, the syllabus indicates available editions, additional (optional) reading and assignments (a 3-5 page essay).

COURSE Syllabus: Early Monastic Sources

THE 225. The Rule of Benedict.
Fr. Terrence Kardong, OSB. MA, STL.

Using a syllabus keyed to his new (1996) and highly acclaimed commentary on the Rule of St. Benedict, Fr. Terrence introduces the student to the sources, structure and content of the rule.

COURSE Syllabus: The Rule of Benedict

THE 425B. Medieval Monastic Spirituality.
Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD.

Traces the development of Monastic spirituality from Benedict to the reform movements of the fifteenth century, with particular emphasis on the writers of the twelfth century. The readings will include various genres: treatises, prayers, lives.

COURSE Syllabus: Medieval Monastic Spirituality

THE 325A. History of US Benedictine Monks.
Fr. Joel Rippinger, OSB, STL, MA.

10 sessions survey the history of Benedictine monks in the United States. Each session includes considerable amount of readings, and then reflection and 1 or 2 page response to 3 or 4 assigned questions.

THE 125A. Introduction to the New Testament.
Dr. Anna Minore, PhD

This course will introduce students to the writings of the New Testament. In order to understand those writings, it will also refer to the Hebrew Scriptures and give some idea of the cultural and historical context of the time, as well as the history of the Jewish people. In addition, it will look to contemporary interpretations of the texts and put those texts into dialogue with issues in contemporary life.

COURSE Syllabus: Introduction to the New Testament

[IMAGE] THE 325E. American Benedictine Women's History. Sr.
Judith Sutera, OSB, MA.

Using a bibliography of books, Vatican II documents and recent articles, 30 lessons lead the students to a knowledge of Benedictine women's history in North America, while at the same time inviting the student to compare various eras and think critically about the contemporary implications of historical events.

THE 425A. Art and Monasticism.
Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD.

Beginning with the Rule of Benedict, studies both the theory (John of Damascus, Theophilus, Bernard of Clairvaux, Merton) and practice (Braunfels) of Monastic Art and Architecture. Because of the nature of the sources, an eclectic but stimulating series of sources and reflections on art and monasticism, focusing in particular on St. Bernard's critique of figural art in Benedictine monasteries.

COURSE Syllabus: Art and Monasticism

THE 325B. Nature of Benedictine Prayer.
Sr. Lucy Wynkoop, OSB, MA.

The Rule Benedict, ch. 20, speaks of purity of heart and tears of compunction.” Using a variety of resources which may be tailored to individual needs, this course looks at the influence of Scripture, Antony, Cassian and Evagrius on the RB, which emphasizes awareness of the presence of God. Qualities of Benedictine Prayer which aid awareness are attentiveness, listening, desire, imageless prayer and discernment. Joan Chittister describes Benedictine prayer as universal, converting, reflective and communal."

COURSE Syllabus: Nature of Benedictine Prayer: Reflections on RB 20

THE 325. Women Christian Mystics
Dr. Anna Minore, Ph.D.

This course centers on seven Christian Women Mystics: Hildegard of Bingen, Clare of Assisi, Mechthild of Magdeburg, Julian of Norwich, Catherine of Siena, Teresa of Avila, and Therese of Lisieux. For each mystic, students will be asked to read introductory material and a selection from the mystic’s own writings. The goal of the course is to enable the student to study mystics’ reports of their own experiences, and in so doing to explore those experiences in light of their cultural, ethical, and theological content.

COURSE Syllabus: Women Christian Mystics

THE 325: Communion of Saints: Theology of the Church
Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

This course seeks to understand the mystery of the church by studying the development of the ecclesiology in the NT and throughout church history culminating in the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church of Vatican II (Lumen Gentium). Like that document, the course considers “the communion of God’s holy people” in a wide sense and so includes the communion of saints including eschatology, and the current theology of communion and its relation to ecumenism.

COURSE Syllabus: Communion of Saints: Theology of the Church

THE 325: History of the Christian Church
Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

A survey of the history of the Christian Church which considers especially the relationship of church and society, the development of the Eucharistic liturgy, a representative saint from each era, and aspects of each era which Christians entering the third millennium might ponder. Because of time constraints, we will have to focus primarily on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church and on Europe. Rather than concentrating on more recent events, we will try to give each period about equal time.

COURSE Syllabus: History of the Christian Church

THE 325: Introduction to St. Benedict and the Benedictines
(Non credit only] Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB or Sr. Judith Sutera, OSB

This course is meant to provide a first introduction to St. Benedict, his rule, and the history and life of those who have lived by his rule through the centuries. Those taking the course will read the Rule of Benedict and a brief commentary, the Life of Benedict in St. Gregory the Great’s Dialogues, and a brief history of Christian monasticism.

COURSE Syllabus: Introduction to St. Benedict and the Benedictines

THE 325P: Living and Praying the Psalms
Instructor: Fr. Kenneth C. Hein, O.S.B., D.Th.

Through fifteen sessions requiring about six hours each of study, writing, and interaction, the student is introduced to the Psalms of the Old Testament as well as some of the canticles of the Bible. In addition to becoming acquainted with the content of the Psalms, the student will perform exercises to promote his/her personal assimilation of the Psalms in life and in prayer.

COURSE Syllabus: Living and Praying the Psalms

Further Information: Courses / History and Mission / Procedures / Tuition Costs

The Monastery Of The Ascension
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The Monastery Of The Ascension is a community of fifteen Benedictine monks which has been in Southern Idaho since 1965. We live a life of prayer, work and reading accordng to the Rule of St. Benedict and try to serve the Catholic Church and the people of southern Idaho through various ministries which include parochial work, retreats, teaching and scholarship, ecumenical activities, counseling and spiritual direction, and social service.
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Benedictine Distance Learning:
Syllabus: EARLY MONASTIC SOURCES

Further Information: Courses / History and Mission / Procedures / Tuition Costs

[IMAGE] Mary Forman, OSB / Early Monastic Sources

SYLLABUS FOR THE STUDY AND REFLECTION ON EARLY MONASTIC SOURCES

This course is designed with ten lessons, that is, ten major early monastic works, which represent some of the "fathers" to which Benedict refers in the last chapter of his rule. The goal for this course is your familiarity with some of the key texts that shaped the thought and lives of monastic men and women over the centuries. Each of the lessons will list one or more good translations of a primary text, followed by a listing of additional material from secondary sources or scholars who have studied a particular author, work or time period and can contribute background to the understanding of that text or personality. In addition, there will be an expected assignment whose purpose is designed in such a way that the one studying and reflecting on the text can have one explicit means for interpreting the text in relation to one's own experience. The assignments are not intended to be the only way a person can experience, study or analyze the text. If the particular assignment does not draw from your reading of the text a valuable insight, you are free to contact the designer of this course to dialogue about a more useful model of reflection. The three key areas of the course are outlined below. Please read through all three areas before beginning the first lesson.

Required Texts

Before you can begin this course, you will need to ascertain if the major texts for the course are in your library. Where there is more than one good translation available, you will notice a and b offerings.

1. RB-1980: The Rule of St. Benedict In Latin and English with Notes, ed. Timothy Fry et al (Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 1981).

2a. St. Athanasius - The Life of Saint Antony, Ancient Christian Writers 10, tr. Robert T. Meyer (NY: Newman Press, 1950, 1978). OR

2b. Athanasius: The Life of Antony and the Letter to Marcellinus, The Classics of Western Spirituality, tr. Robert C. Gregg (NY: Paulist Press, 1980).

3a. The Sayings of the Desert Fathers: The Alphabetical Collection, CSS 9, tr. Benedicta Ward (London & Oxford: Mow bray/USA: Cistercian Publications, 1975, rev. ed'n. 1984). OR

3b. The Wisdom of the Desert Fathers: Apopthegmata Patrum from the Anonymous Series, CSS 48, tr. Benedicta Ward (Fairacres, Oxford: SLG Press/ USA: Cistercian Publications, 1975, rpt. 1977). TOGETHER WITH

3b. The World of the Desert Fathers: Sayings from the Anonymous Series of the Apophthegmata Patrum, SLG 95, tr. Columba Stewart (Fairacres, Oxford: SLG Press/USA Cistercian Publications, 1986).

4. The Lives of the Desert Fathers: The Historia Monachorum in Aegypto, CSS 34, tr. Norman Russell (London & Oxford: Mowbray/USA: Cistercian Publications, 1980).

5. Evagrius Ponticus - The Praktikos & Chapters on Prayer, CSS 4, tr. John Eudes Bamberger (Kalamazoo, MI: Cistercian Publication, 1981).

6. Pachomian Koinonia I : The Life of Saint Pachomius, CSS 45, tr. Armand Veilleux (Kalamazoo, MI: Cistercian Publications, 1980).

7a. Gregory of Nyssa, "The Life of Saint Macrina," pp. 159-191 in Saint Gregory of Nyssa: Ascetical Works, The Fathers of the Church 58, ed. Roy J. Deferrari, tr. Virginia Wood Callahan (Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1967). OR

7b. Gregory, Bishop of Nyssa, The Life of Saint Macrina, tr. Kevin Corrigan (Toronto, Ontario M6P 1L6: Peregrina Publications, 17 Woodside Avenue, 1987).

8a. Jerome, "Life of Paul the Hermit," "Life of St. Hilarion," "Life of Malchus, the Captive Monk, " pp. 299-318 in The Principal Works of St. Jerome, NPNF 2.6 ed. Philip Schaff and Henry Wace, tr. W. H. Fremantle (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1989 rpt. [better translation] OR

8b. Jerome, "Life of Paul the Hermit, " "Life of St. Hilarion," "Life of Malchus, The captive Monk, " pp. 217-297 in Early Christian Biographies, Fathers of the Church 15, ed. Roy J. Deferrari, tr. Marie Liguori Ewald (Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1952).

9a. Augustine of Hippo, The Confessions of St. Augustine, tr. John K. Ryan (Garden City, NY: Image Books, a Division of Doubleday &Co., Inc., 1966). OR

9b. Saint Augustine - Confessions, tr. Henry Chadwick (Oxford University Press, 1991). [These two are the best English translations in my humble opinion; you may have older versions in your libraries, which can be read for the overall thought. I always use the above translations for courses I teach because the translations are so much closer to the Latin idioms.]

10a. John Cassian: Conferences, Classics of Western Spirituality, tr. Colm Luibheid (NY: Paulist Press, 1985 [a rather free translations but easily obtainable; contains only a few of the conferences]). OR

10b. John Cassian: The Conferences, Ancient Christian Writers 57, tr. Boniface Ramsey (New York/Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press, 1997. [Best translation available.] OR

10c. John Cassian: The Institutes, Ancient Christian Writers 58, tr. Boniface Ramsey (New York/Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press, 2000. [Best translation available.]

11. William Harmless, Desert Christians: An Introduction to the Literature of Early Monasticism (Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 2004).

Additional Texts

These are intended to be optional books and articles that give a broad background on a particular personality or work. If it is possible to obtain copies of some of the material, this will enhance your understanding of the history, genre of literature and culture out of which a work developed. Several of the required texts have excellent introductions and a few have good footnotes that will accomplish the same aim of filling in the background. I have not made a separate list here; instead you will find the optional material listed under each lesson.

Assignments

A 3-5 page Reflection Paper is the normal expectation for each of the books. The purpose of the Reflection Paper is to provide a vehicle whereby you can integrate your insights, comments, questions from the reading with your own experience. In the writing of the paper, please list the full title and publication information of the particular translation you are using. Direct quotations and extensive borrowing of any material from the book or additional reading matter need to follow a format of giving credit to your source. You may choose to either use the format (author name / one or two words of the title, page no.) with a separate page at the end of your paper listing the work in full, OR to use footnotes. For the most part, these papers are intended to be your reflections on the material as ideas strike you during the reading and not academic papers. However, others' ideas need to be credited to them in recognition of their study, reflection and writing. It is probably best to send each paper as you finish the reading of a particular work and your reflection upon it, but you may also wish to send two or three at a time in the interests of saving postage. Papers may be sent directly to me, or via e-mail: Sister Mary Forman, OSB mforman@csbsju.edu Saint John’s University School of Theology-Seminary P. O. Box 7288 Collegeville, Minnesota 56321-7288 (320) 363-2618

My intention is to read the paper (s), make comments and return them as soon as feasibly possible.

At the completion of the course, please fill out the evaluation sheet and mail that also to me. Feedback makes it possible to improve the course for the next people.

LESSONS

I. Overview on the Beginnings of Christian Monasticism

A. Required Reading

Mark Sheridan, "Introduction: The Origins of Monasticism in the Early Church, " RB-1980: The Rule of St. Benedict In Latin and English with Notes, ed. Timothy Fry et al. (Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 1981), pp. 3-41.

Claude Peifer, "Pre-Benedictine Monasticism in the Western Church," RB-1980, pp. 42- 64.

B. Additional Reading (optional)

Vincent Desprez, "The Origins of Western Monasticism," tr. Terrence Kardong, American Benedictine Review (ABR) 41:1 (March 1990): 99-112.

Vincent Desprez, "The Origins of Western Monasticism II. Africa and Spain," tr. David Dwyer, ABR 41:2 (June 1990) : 167-191.

Adalbert de Vogue, "To Study the Early Monks," Monastic Studies 12 (1976) : 55-83. C. Assignment

Write a 4-5 page paper comparing and contrasting the characteristics of Eastern and Western monasticism. How do these characteristics bear upon your experience of monasticism?

II. Life of Antony

A. Required Reading

St. Athanasius - The Life of Saint Antony, Ancient Christian Writers 10, tr. Robert T. Meyer (NY: Newman Press, 1950, 1978). OR

Athanasius: The Life of Antony and the Letter to Marcellinus, The Classics of Western Spirituality, tr. Robert C. Gregg (NY: Paulist Press, 1980).

B. Additional Reading (optional)

Vincent Desprez, "Saint Antony and the Beginnings of Anchoritism, " tr. David Dwyer, ABR 43:1 (March 1992): 66-81.

Vincent Desprez, "Saint Antony and the Beginnings of Anchoritism II," tr. Terrence Kardong, ABR 43:2 (June 1992): 141-172.

William Harmless, ch. 3: "The Life of Antony: Text and Context," pp. 57-77, and ch. 4: "The Life of Antony: Themes and Influence," pp. 85-104, in Desert Christians: An Introduction to the Literature of Early Monasticism.

C. Assignment

Choose one or two teaching(s) or incidents(s) in Antony's life and relate them to the rest of his life. Consider how this teaching/ incident impacts your own life. Write a 3-4 page reflection paper describing this teaching/ incident and its relation to your own life.

III. Apophthegmata Patrum

A. Required Reading

The Sayings of the Desert Fathers: The Alphabetical Collection, CSS 9, tr. Benedicta Ward (London & Oxford: Mowbray/USA: Cistercian Publications, 1975, rev. ed'n. 1984). OR

The Wisdom of the Desert Fathers: Apopthegmata Patrum from the Anonymous Series, CSS 48, tr. Benedicta Ward (Fairacres, Oxford: SLG Press/ USA: Cistercian Publications, 1975, rpt. 1977). TOGETHER WITH

The World of the Desert Fathers: Sayings from the Anonymous Series of the Apophthegmata Patrum, SLG 95, tr. Columba Stewart (Fairacres, Oxford: SLG Press/USA Cistercian Publications, 1986).

B . Additional Reading (optional)

Peter Brown, "The Desert Fathers: Antony to John Climacus, " pp. 213-235 in The Body and Society: Men, Women and Sexual Renunciation in Early Christianity, Lectures on the History of Religions Sponsored by the American Council of Learned Societies, New Series 13 (NY: Columbia University Press, 1988).

William Harmless, ch. 6: "The Apophthegmata Patrum: Text and Context," pp. 167-186, and ch. 7: "The Apophthegmata Patrum: Portraits," pp. 193-226, and ch. 8: "The Apophthegmata Patrum: Themes," pp. 227-257, in in Desert Christians: An Introduction to the Literature of Early Monasticism.

Brian Patrick McGuire, "The Wisdom of the Eastern Fathers, " pp. 1-37 in Friendship and Community: the Monastic Experience 350-1250, CSS 95 (Kalamazoo, MI: Cistercian Publications, 1988).

Simon Tugwell, "The Desert Fathers," pp. 13-24 in Ways of Imperfection: An Exploration of Christian Spirituality (Springfield, IL: Templegate Publishers, 1985).

C. Assignment

If at all possible, read most of the work The Sayings of the Desert Fathers AND The World of the Desert Fathers. Then choose one topic, like prayer, charity, peace, fasting, etc. (whatever speaks to you) and look up all the sayings under that topic. (You may need to use the General Index and the back of The Sayings of the Desert Fathers; The Wisdom and The World are already arranged by topic.) Write a 4-5 page reflection paper about how the desert abbas/ammas understood that topic in their own lives, by responding to these questions: What of their teaching finds resonance with your own? How do you account for the difference? Of the teaching to which you relate well, how do you see yourself implementing it in your own life?

IV. Historia monachorum

A. Required Reading

The Lives of the Desert Fathers: The Historia Monachorum in Aegypto, CSS 34, tr. Norman Russell (London & Oxford: Mowbray/USA: Cistercian Publications, 1980), pp. 49-161.

B. Additional Reading (optional)

Norman Russell, Introduction, pp. 3-46 in The Lives of the Desert Fathers (listed immediately above).

Derwas J. Chitty, The Desert a City: An Introduction to the Study of Egyptian and Palestinian Monasticism under the Christian Empire (Crestwood, NJ: St. Vladmir's Seminary Press, 1966), chapters 1-3 in particular.

William Harmless, ch. 9: "The Histories," pp. 275-304, in Desert Christians: An Introduction to the Literature of Early Monasticism.

C. Assignment

Option 1: Select one abba/amma who appears in The Lives of The Desert Fathers/ Historia monachorum and also appears in the apophthegms in The Sayings of the Desert Fathers. Compare and contrast how each of these two works represents the elder: Are the stories the same or different? What aspects of their personality appear in one work but not the other? If a similar saying occurs in both works, what details are incorporated of left out from one work to the other? Write up your findings in a 4-5 page paper.

Option 2: If you selected a particular topic from the Anonymous Collections (The Wisdom of the Desert Fathers and The World of the Desert Fathers), then follow through that topic by researching how the topic is also developed in The Lives of the Desert Fathers/ Historia monacharum, by using the Subject Index at the back. Write up your findings in a 4-5 page reflection paper. by responding to these questions: What further insight(s) into the topic do you gain from this body of literature? How does the format of stories of lives shape the presentation of the topic from your previous study of it in the anonymous apophthegms? How do these insights intersect with your own experience of the topic?

V. Evagrius Ponticus, First Systematician of Monasticism

A. Required Reading

Evagrius Ponticus - The Praktikos & Chapters on Prayer, CSS 4, tr. John Eudes Bamberger (Kalamazoo, MI: Cistercian Publication, 1981). Read the whole book, including the two introductions.

B. Additional Reading (optional)

Louis Bouyer, "Erudite Monasticism, " pp. 380-394 in The Spirituality of the New Testament and the Fathers (Burns & Oates, 1963).

William Harmless, ch. 10: "Evagrius Ponticus: Ascetical Theory," pp. 311-338, and ch. 11: "Evagrius Ponticus: Mystical Theology," pp. 345369, in Desert Christians: An Introduction to the Literature of Early Monasticism.

Tomas Spidlik, "Spiritual Warfare," pp. 233-266 and "Purification of the Passions," pp. 267-281 in The Spirituality of the Christian East: A Systematic Handbook, CSS 79, tr. Antony P. Gythiel (Kalamazoo, MI: Cistercian Publications, 1986).

Simon Tugwell, "Evagrius Ponticus," pp. 25-36 in Ways of Imperfection: An Exploration of Christian Spirituality (Springfield, IL: Templegate Publishers, 1985).

Palladius: The Lausiac History, "Evagrius," pp. 110-114, ACW 34, tr. Robert T. Meyer (Westminster, MD: The Newman Press/ London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1965).

C. Assignment

Select one of the vices Evagrius describes on p. 16-26 of the Praktikos and note the characteristics of that vice. Reflect on how that vice gets "lived out" today. Write a short reflection (2-3 pages) on that vice in your words, based on how you envision its embodiment in your own time and culture. In addition, select one aspect of prayer from the Chapters on Prayer and consider the challenge Evagrius poses to your own prayer life. Write another short reflection (2-3 pages) on your awareness of your prayer life and the advice Evagrius offers.

VI. Pachomius, Father of Cenobitism

A. Required Reading

"The First Greek Life (G1)," pp. 297-423 of Pachomian Koinonia I: The Life of Saint Pachomius, CSS 45, tr. Armand Veilleux (Kalamazoo, MI: Cistercian, 1980).

B. Additional Reading (optional)

Armand Veilleux, "Holy Scripture in the Pachomian Koinonia," Monastic Studies 10 (1974): 143-153.

Vincent Desprez, "Pachomian Cenobitism: I," tr. Terrence Kardong, ABR 43:3 (Sept. 1992): 233-249.

Vincent Desprez, "Pachomian Cenobitism: II," tr. Terrence Kardong, ABR 43:4 (Dec. 1992): 358-394.

William Harmless, ch. 5: "Pachomius," pp. 115-152, in Desert Christians: An Introduction to the Literature of Early Monasticism.

C. Assignment

Select one or two incidents from Pachomius' life which speak to you of what kind of man he was. Reread them in the Greek Life and then go to the parallel story in "The Bohairic Life of Pachomius," and read that account. (In the margin of the Greek Life, you will find the abbreviation "SBO" followed by chapter numbers corresponding to the parallels in the first part of the book.) Compare and contrast how each Life - the Greek and the Bohairic - presents the saint. What does this tell you about the writers of each account? What seems to be important to each to communicate? What speaks to you about the life of this holy abba? Write up your learnings in a 4-5 page reflection.

VII. Life of Macrina, Sister to Basil of Caesarea and Gregory of Nyssa

A. Required Reading

Gregory of Nyssa, "The Life of Saint Macrina," pp. 159-191 in Saint Gregory of Nyssa: Ascetical Works, The Fathers of the Church 58, ed. Roy J. Deferrari, tr. Virginia Wood Callahan (Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1967). OR

Gregory, Bishop of Nyssa, The Life of Saint Macrina, tr. Kevin Corrigan (Toronto, Ontario: Peregrina Publications, 1987).

B. Additional Reading (optional)

Peter Brown, "Marriage and Mortality: Gregory of Nyssa," pp. 285-304, in The Body and Society: Men, Women and Sexual Renunciation in Early Christianity, Lectures on the History of Religions Sponsored by the American Council of Learned Societies, New Series 13 (NY: Columbia University Press, 1988).

Kevin Corrigan, "Saint Macrina: The Hidden Face Behind the Tradition," Vox Benedictina 5:1 (January 1988): 12-42.

Kevin Corrigan, "Syncletica and Macrina: Two Early Lives of Women Saints," Vox Benedictina 6:3 (July 1989): 241-256.

C. Assignment

Reflect on these questions: In what ways does Gregory feel Macrina influenced his life? What does the role of a deeply Christian woman play in the "family asceticism" of Annisa? What does this say to you about the influence of others in your own Christian life? Write up your reflections in a 4-5 page paper.

VIII. Jerome's Vitae Pauli, Hilarionis et Malachi

A. Required Reading

Jerome, "Life of Paul the Hermit," "Life of St. Hilarion," "Life of Malchus, the Captive Monk, " pp. 299-318 in The Principal Works of St. Jerome, NPNF 2.6 ed. Philip Schaff and Henry Wace, tr. W. H. Fremantle (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1989 rpt. [better translation] OR

Jerome, "Life of Paul the Hermit, " "Life of St. Hilarion," "Life of Malchus, The Captive Monk," pp. 217-297 in Early Christian Biographies, Fathers of the Church 15, ed. Roy J. Deferrari, tr. Marie Liguori Ewald (Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1952).

B. Additional Reading (optional)

Peter Brown, "Learn of Me a Holy Arrogance: Jerome," pp. 366-386 in The Body and Society: Men, Women and Sexual Renunciation in Early Christianity, Lectures on the History of Religions Sponsored by the American Council of Learned Societies, New Series 13 (NY: Columbia University Press, 1988).

Kelly, J.N.D., Jerome: His Life, Writings, and Controversies (London: Gerald Duckworth & Co., 1975).

C. Assignment

Read each of the Lives of Paul, Hilarion and Malachy and draw up an outline of the chapters and list each of the important observances which Jerome emphasizes. Examine what are recurring themes for him throughout these three lives. What kind of picture of monasticism does Jerome seek to present through his writings? How does his picture coincide with what you have learned from your previous reading? Write up your outline and attach a 2-3 page reflection on what kind of person represents a model ascetic for Jerome in comparison to other writers' perceptions.

IX. Augustine of Hippo, Confessions

A. Required Reading

Augustine of Hippo, The Confessions of St. Augustine, Books I-IX, tr. John K. Ryan (Garden City, NY: Image Books, a Division of Doubleday &Co., Inc., 1966). OR

Saint Augustine - Confessions, Books I-IX, tr. Henry Chadwick (Oxford University Press, 1991).

B. Additional Reading (optional)

Peter Brown, Augustine of Hippo: A Biography (Berkeley: U of California Press, 1967).

Andrew Louth, "Augustine," pp. 134-145 in The Study of Spirituality, ed. Cheslyn Jones et al. (NY/ Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986).

C. Assignment

Read Confessions Books I-IX. Reflect on one of the following key figures or writings from each of three different time periods and how they shaped Augustine's awareness of what is ultimately important: early teachers (Bk 1, ch 9, 13-14= I.9.13-14); peers (II.4, 8); Cicero (III.4-5); Manichees (III.6, 9-10; IV.1-3); unnamed friend who died (IV.4-8); Faustus the Manichaean (V.3, 5-7); Monica his mother (II.11-13; V.8-9; VI.1-2, 13; IX.8-12); Ambrose (V.13-14; VI.3; IX.5-6); Scripture (III.5; VI.5; VII.9-10); Alypius (VI.7-10, 12); Mother of Adeodatus (III.1; Bk VI.15); Jesus Christ (VII.18-19); Victorinus (VIII.2-5); Ponticianus and Antony (VIII.6-7); and the experience of God in the garden (VIII.8-12).

Write a 4-5 page essay on the influence you see exerted upon Augustine and how they shaped who he was at a certain stage in his life. Incorporate your own awareness of significant influences in your own spiritual life.

X. Cassian, Conferences

A. Required Reading

John Cassian: Conferences, Classics of Western Spirituality, tr. Colm Luibheid (NY: Paulist Press, 1985. OR

John Cassian: The Conferences, Ancient Christian Writers 57, tr. Boniface Ramsey (New York/Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press, 1997. Read "Conferences 1-3, 9-11, 14-15, 18. OR

John Cassian: The Institutes, Ancient Christian Writers 58, tr. Boniface Ramsey (New York/Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press, 2000.

B. Additional Reading (optional)

Richard Byrne, "Cassian and the Goals of Monastic Life," Cistercian Studies 22 (1987) : 3-16.

William Harmless, Ch. 12: "John Cassian," pp. 373-409, in Desert Christians: An Introduction to the Literature of Early Monasticism.

Terrence Kardong, "Aiming for the Mark: Cassian's Metaphor for the Monastic Quest," Cistercian Studies 22 (1987) : 213-220.

Terrence Kardong, "John Cassian's Evaluation of Monastic Practices," ABR 43:1 (March 1992) : 82-105.

Columba Stewart, "John Cassian on Unceasing Prayer," Monastic Studies 15 (Advent 1984) : 159-177.

C. Assignment

Consider one of the topics in the Conferences, e.g., prayer, discernment, perfection, kind of monks, etc. Write down Cassian's main points about that topic, then take 4 or 5 of them to prayer. As you recite the sayings in your heart, what image(s) come(s) to mind? What do you feel called to live? What in your own life would need a reorientation to live this truth? Write up your reflections in a 4-5 page paper that incorporates both Cassian's thoughts and your own interpretation of them.

EVALUATION SHEET

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Time it took you to complete the Course:

The reason I initially enrolled in the Course was…

The course met (did not meet) my expectations because…

The single most important insight I came away with from the readings for this course was…

As I look back over the assignments for this course, one of the ways I am aware they have been helpful to me is…

If there is one thing I could change about the course it would be:

I would / would not take another course of this kind because…

I would / would not recommend this course to a friend because...

Further Information: Courses / History and Mission / Procedures / Tuition Costs

The Monastery Of The Ascension
541 East–100 South
Jerome, ID 83338
208-324-2377
Would you like more information?
Or just want to drop us a note?
We would be happy to attempt to answ

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http://www.osb.org/aba/studies.html



The American Benedictine Academy

Academic Programs of Monastic Studies
and Sources of Funding for Monastics


Benedictine Consortium
Monastery of the Ascension

This Consortium connects, electronically, monastic studies experts and students from around the U.S. Each course amounts to two (15 week) semester hours of college work. Most of courses may be taken for credit granted by the University of Mary, Bismarck, ND. Cost per two-semester hour course is about $150 non-credit, $300 for credit. The Consortium offers some scholarships to Third World monastics and to some Oblates.

Benedictine Consortium for Distance Learning
Monastery of the Ascension
541 East-100 South
Jerome, Idaho 83338

Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, Coordinator
Phone & fax: 208-324-2377
Email: monastery @ idahomonks.org
<www.idahomonks.org/bdl.htm>


Collegeville Institute
for Ecumenical and Cultural Research
Collegeville, Minnesota

Website for the Collegeville Institute: < www.collegevilleinstitute.org/>

A brief description of the Resident Scholars Program: <www.collegevilleinstitute.org/resident1>
The program, set in a scholarly, prayerful community, is normally for post-doctoral research. The Bishop Thomas Hoyt, Jr., Fellowship provides funding for North American persons of color writing a doctoral dissertation: <www.collegevilleinstitute.org/res-fellowships>

Collegeville Institute
14027 Fruit Farm Road
Box 2000
Collegeville, MN 56321
Fax: 320-363-3313

Donald B. Ottenhoff, Director
320-363-3367
dottenhoff @ collegevilleinstitute.org


The Monastic Institute
Collegio Sant'Anselmo

Tuition, room and board at The Monastic Institute are relatively inexpensive, but the city of Rome is one of the most expensive in Europe.

Collegio Sant'Anselmo
Piazza dei Cavalieri di Malta, 5
I-00153 Roma,
ITALY

P. Gregory Collins OSB, Coordinator <EarlCollins @ hotmail.com>


Monastic Studies
Saint John's University

The School of Theology is well provided with scholarships and grants. Benedictines are given a generous tuition discount. For information about scholarships and some grants: <www.csbsju.edu/sot/admission/Scholarships.htm>

For information about Monastic Studies at Saint John's University School of Theology:

Monastic Studies
School of Theology·Seminary
Saint John's University
Collegeville, MN 56321
<www.csbsju.edu/sot/>

Phone: 320-363-2102
Toll-Free: 800-361-8318
Fax: 320-363-3145
E-mail: sotadmission@csbsju.edu


Monastic Studies
St Benet's Hall, Oxford

"St Benet's Hall traces its descent from the medieval Benedictine and Cistercian monastic colleges of Oxford, the earliest of which was founded in 1283. The colleges aimed to provide the monks of their time with a formation in theology, much as St Benet's does today." St Benet's offers residential courses in Monastic Studies.

St Benet's Hall
38, St. Giles Street
Oxford OX1 3LN
England, UK
Phone: +01865 280556
<www.st-benets.ox.ac.uk/>


MA in Monastic Studies
University of Wales, Lampeter

The MA in Monastic Studies is designed for distance learning and features modules based around retreats at various monasteries. Research proposals for MPhil and PhD study are welcome.
 

Dr Augustine Casiday
Department of Theology and Religious Studies
University of Wales, Lampeter
Lampeter, Ceredigion SA48 7ED
United Kingdom
Telephone: +44 (0) 01570 424 708
Fax: +44 (0) 01570 423 641
Email: a.casiday@lamp.ac.uk


Saint Vincent Archabbey Seminary

Saint Vincent Archabbey Seminary offers a program in Monastic Studies.

The primary mission of the Seminary is to provide programs for priestly and permanent diaconate candidates. It also offers degree programs to qualified men and women seeking a theological education.

Program in Monastic Studies
Saint Vincent Archabbey Seminary
300 Fraser Purchase Road
Latrobe, PA 15650-2690
<www.saintvincentseminary.edu/>

Very Rev. Justin Matro OSB, Rector
Tel. 724-539-9761


Studium
Saint Benedict's Monastery

Studium offers two $500 scholarships yearly. Studium invites women of all faiths. Scholars are provided offices alongside Studium members. Scholars are invited to participate in the daily common life of the monastic community. Scholars share the fruit of their research with the broader community during their residency. Studium links creative talents in the arts, liturgy, spirituality, research, and concerns for justice and ecology. Participants share research and experience through informal exchange, lectures, conferences and publications. Studium provides a means for dialogue between monastics and members of contemporary society.

Scholars-in-Residence Program
104 Chapel Lane
St. Joseph, MN 56374-0277
<www.sbm.osb.org/scholarsinresidence.html>

Sr. Dolores Super, OSB, Director of Studium
E-mail: dsuper @ csbsju.edu


Western Michigan University
Monastic Studies

The Medieval Institute of Western Michigan University usually sponsors research activities. The Medieval Institute has received a number of grants and awards as an institution, but not for individual students. The National Endowment for the Humanities has funded the Medieval Institute for summer seminars and institutes.

The Medieval Institute
Western Michigan University
1903 West Michigan Avenue
Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5432

Phone: 269-387-8745
Fax: 269-387-8750
<medieval-institute@wmich.edu>
<www.wmich.edu/medieval/>

 

Sources of Funding

American Benedictine Academy

The Monastic Studies Grant is awarded annually to support members in projects that foster the mission of the ABA, "to cultivate, support and transmit the Benedictine heritage within contemporary culture."

S. Adel Sautner OSB
Exec. Secretary, ABA
415 S. Crow St.
Pierre, SD 57501-3304
<www.osb.org/aba/>


Foundations and Donors Interested
in Catholic Activities (FADICA)

FADICA offers: The Catholic Funding Guide, Third Edition, $80.00 for the book, shipping and handlng. This book is an unparalleled resource for Catholic funding. It is widely available through Inter-Library Loan.

FADICA, Inc.
PO Box 57223
Washington, DC 20036
FAX: 202-296-9295


Koch Foundation, Inc.

The interests of the Koch Foundation involve religious activities. Sisters at Saint Benedict's Monastery, St. Joseph, MN, have used this foundation to support monastic studies.

Koch Foundation, Inc.
2830 N.W. 41st Street
Suite H
Gainesville, FL 32606
Tel: 904-373-7491

 

OSB | ABA | American Monastic Newsletter





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