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Summary of A Gender Not Listed Here: Genderqueers, Gender Rebels, and OtherWise in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey

Trans-Interactions #53:                      Issued: Sunday, February 17, 2013 at 11:36A                 by: Kate Vasquez, M.A.

Summary of A Gender Not Listed Here: Genderqueers, Gender Rebels, and OtherWise in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey

“The liberation of language is rooted in the liberation of ourselves.”

Mary Daly (1928– 2010), U.S. feminist and theologian.

Beyond God the Father, Toward a Philosophy of Women's Liberation.

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In February 2011, the National Center for Transgender Equality and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force collaborated to produce Injustice at Every Turn: A Report of the National Transgender Discrimination Survey. The survey consisted of 6,450 Trans- and Gender Non-Conforming (T-GNC) participants from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands and has provided data for civic leaders and activists for the cause of equality.

Subsequent to the release of that survey, the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force produced A Gender Not Listed Here: Genderqueers, Gender Rebels, and Other Wise in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey. Released on April 23, 2012, this article is based upon the responses of 860 (13.3%) of the original 6,450 T-GNC participants from the original survey who, rather than identify themselves as “male/man”, “female/woman”, or “part-time as one gender, part-time as another”, opted to write in their gender identities.

Question #3 of the National Transgender Discrimination Survey reads as follows:

 

Q3: What is your primary gender identity today?

o   Male/man

o   Female/woman

o   Part-time as one gender, part-time as another

o   A gender not listed here, please specify ____________

 

Responses to the four options were: “male/man” (26%); “female/woman” (41 %); “part time as one gender, part time as another” (20 %); and “A gender not listed here…” (GNL)” (13 %).

Participants who wrote in or specified their gender identities for Question 3: “A gender not listed here, …” (referred to as “Q3GNL participants”) produced many responses (refer to item G: Gender Identity: Terms of Identity). Many of these responses speak to the creativity, humor, and resistance of Q3GNL participants to limit themselves to conventional gender identity terms. Some Q3GNL participants claimed some of the below-listed terms while expressing the belief that they possess no gender or are without gender at the same time.

Despite their resilience and ability to define themselves in broader terms and to hold more ideas of identity in mind than conventional notions, overall Q3GNL participants face greater discrimination, risk, and violence than their transgender counterparts in most of the survey categories. A summary of this survey reveals the following key and startling findings:

Q3GNL Overview (See Table 1):

A.   Gender Spectrum:

Q3GNL participants reported identifying more often on the trans-masculine spectrum than participants overall. “Trans-masculine” being understood as “beyond the conventional definition of ‘masculine’”; 73% of Q3GNL participants reported their sex assigned at birth as “Female” in comparison to 40% of the overall sample.

B.    Race:

Q3GNL participants were less likely to be White and more likely to be “Multiracial (18% compared to 11%)”, “Black only (5% compared to 4%)”, and “Asian or Pacific Islander only (3% compared to 2%)”. This is apparent in the comparison between the percentages of “Q3GNLs” and “Those who didn’t write in gender”.

C.    Region:

Q3GNL participants live in California (16% compared to 14%), the Northeast (12% compared to 8%), the Mid-Atlantic States (23% compared to 21%), and the West (18% compared to 16%) at higher rates; and the Midwest and the South at lower rates. This is apparent in the comparison between the percentages of “Q3GNLs” and “Those who didn’t write in gender”.

D.   Annual Household Income:

Q3GNL participants reported having a lower annual income than those who didn’t write in their gender and the overall sample. This is especially notable in income brackets at $50,000 and under in which Q3GNL participants’ reported annual household income percentages ranging from 1-7% lower.

E.    Educational Attainment:

Q3GNL participants reported having higher educational attainment than participants who did not write in their gender and the overall sample. This is notable in a comparison of participants reported percentages of “College degree only” and “Any graduate degree”. Q3GNL participants’ reported educational attainment percentages ranging from 3-9% higher.

F.    Age:

Q3GNL participants were younger than participants who did not write in their gender. 89% of Q3GNL participants fell in age brackets at 44 and under compared to 68% of “Those who didn’t write in gender”.

G.   Gender Identity (See Figure 1):

Terms of Identity:

1.      39% of Q3GNL participants identified themselves as “genderqueer”

2.      25% of Q3GNL participants identified themselves as “queer”

3.      9.5% of Q3GNL participants identified themselves as “both/neither, neither, in-between, or non-binary” (n=82).

4.      2.6% of Q3GNL participants identified themselves as “non-gendered, gender is a performance, or gender does not exist” (n=23)

5.      2.2% of Q3GNL participants identified themselves as “fluid” (n=19).

6.      2% of Q3GNL participants identified themselves as “Two-Spirit” (n=18).

7.      1.8% of Q3GNL participants identified themselves as “bi-gender, tri-gender, or third-gender” (n=16)

8.      1.1% of Q3GNL participants identified themselves as “genderfuck, rebel, or radical” (n=10).

Note:

Many Q3GNL participants combined many of the terms above or wrote in other terms such as “birl”, “Jest me”, “skankeelong”, “twidget”, “neutrois”, “OtherWise”, “gendertreyf”, “trannydyke”, “genderqueer wombat fantastica”, “Best of Both”, and “gender blur”. 

Table 1
Figure 1

H.   Q3GNL Discrimination (See Table 2):

1.    Education:

a.       83% of Q3GNL participants who reported expressing a trans or gender non-conforming identity while in K-12 schools also reported harassment (compared with 77% of those who did not write in their gender and 78% of the overall survey sample).

b.      16% of Q3GNL participants reported having experienced sexual assault in K-12 schools (compared with 11% of those who did not write in their gender and 12% of the overall survey sample).

2.    Employment:

a.       19% of Q3GNL participants reported having “lost a job due to anti-transgender bias”. This is at a lower rate than those who did not write in their gender (27%) and in comparison to the overall survey sample (26%).

b.      76% of Q3GNL participants reported being more likely to “be out of work” than those who did not write in their gender (56%).

c.       90% of Q3GNL participants reported experiencing some form of anti-transgender bias on the job.

d.      20% of Q3GNL participants reported having participated in underground economies for income. This is at a higher rate than those who did not write in their gender (15%) and in comparison to the overall survey sample (16%).

3.    Health and Health Care:

a.       14% of Q3GNL participants reported being refused medical care due to bias. This is at a lower rate than those who did not write in their gender (20%) and in comparison to the overall survey sample (19%).

b.      36% of Q3GNL participants reported postponing medical care due to fear of discrimination. This is at a higher rate than those who did not write in their gender (27%) and the overall survey sample (28%).

c.       2.9% of Q3GNL participants reported being HIV positive. This is slightly higher rate than those who did not write in their gender (2.5%) and the overall survey sample (2.6%).

d.      11% of Q3GNL participants did not know their HIV status. This is a higher rate than those who did not write in their gender (9%) and the overall survey sample (8%).

e.       43% of Q3GNL participants reported having attempted suicide. This is at a higher rate than those who did not write in their gender (40%) and the overall survey sample (41%).

4.    Police:

a.       31% of Q3GNL participants reported having experienced harassment from police due to bias. This is at a higher rate than those who did not write in their gender (21%) and the overall survey sample (22%).

b.      25% of Q3GNL participants reported feeling very uncomfortable going to police for assistance. This is at a higher rate than those who did not write in their gender (19%) and the overall survey sample (17%).

5.    Violence:

a.       32% of Q3GNL participants reported having been physically assaulted due to bias. This is at a higher rate than those who did not write in their gender (25%) and the overall survey sample (26%).

b.      15% of Q3GNL participants reported having been sexually assaulted due to bias. This is at a higher rate than those who did not write in their gender (9%) and the overall survey sample (10%).

Table 2 

 
This examination of Q3GNL participants within the National Transgender Discrimination Survey is generating awareness of the injustice experienced by them throughout the U.S. Needed thought, education, and discourse is gaining national momentum. However, national civil rights legislation is only beginning to address this injustice and discrimination.

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REFERENCES

National Gay and Lesbian Task Force. (2011, February 2). (Harrison, J. Grant, J. Herman, J.) A Gender Not Listed Here: Genderqueers, Gender Rebels, and Other Wise in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey. Retrieved June 25, 2012, from http://www.thetaskforce.org/reports_and_research/gender_not_listed_here

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For more information, go to the following link(s):

Genderqueer Identities:

Home: http://genderqueerid.com/

Huffington Post: Gay Voices:

“Beyond Male and Female: Creativity, Risks, and Resilience Among Genderqueer People in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey” (dated 5/14/12; retrieved 5/16/12):

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jack-harrison/national-transgender-discrimination-survey_b_1516566.html

Injustice at Every Turn: A Report of the National Transgender Discrimination Survey (Full Report and Executive Summary):

http://www.endtransdiscrimination.org/report.html

National Center for Transgender Equality:

            Home: http://transequality.org/

National Gay and Lesbian Task Force:

Home: http://www.thetaskforce.org/

A Gender Not Listed Here (Full Report):

http://www.thetaskforce.org/downloads/reports/reports/gender_not_listed_here.pdf

A Gender Not Listed Here: Genderqueers, Gender Rebels, and Other Wise in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey (dated 4/23/12; retrieved 6/25/12):

http://www.thetaskforce.org/reports_and_research/gender_not_listed_here

Student Life (Washington University)

“First Genderqueer Week Aims to Take Down Barriers” (11/5/10)]:

http://www.studlife.com/news/campus-events/2010/11/05/first-genderqueer-week-aims-to-break-down-barriers/

Wild Gender:

Home: http://wildgender.com/

“It’s not Easy Outside the Gender Binary, New Study Says” (dated 4/24/12; retrieved 5/16/12):

http://wildgender.com/its-not-so-easy-out-of-the-binary-new-study-says/2296

Williams Institute (The):

Home: http://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/

A Gender Not Listed Here (Full Report):

http://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/Harrison-Herman-Grant-AGender-Apr-2012.pdf

A Gender Not Listed Here: Genderqueers, Gender Rebels, and OtherWise in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey (dated 4/12; retrieved 6/25/12):

http://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/research/transgender-issues/a-gender-not-listed-here-genderqueers-gender-rebels-and-otherwise-in-the-national-transgender-discrimination-survey

Photo Credit:

Genderbread Person: (no date; retrieved 2/15/13):

http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/genderbread-person

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Trans-Interactions Support Project (TSP) is for all transgender, gender non-conforming, and questioning individuals in all aspects of sexuality, all sexual minorities, and their allies. It provides news, information, education, and counseling.

For more information about the TSP, go to https://sites.google.com/site/transinteractions/.

To subscribe to TSP Publications contact Kate Vasquez, M.A. at trans.interactions@gmail.com.

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