ART‎ > ‎2019 - 2020 > ‎
SUPERNATURAL


"UPHOLSTERED OBJECT Nº 2 - DRIP ORIGIN" (right)

stretch velvet, satin, faux animal skin, medium pile fleece, cotton, wood, steel, 2-composite hard density polyurethane foam, medium density foam, polyester batting, spray polyurethane foam, and cardboard

112 L X 83 H x 115 W cm

2019

photo: Quinten Buijsse




DETAIL Nº 1




"UPHOLSTERED OBJECT Nº 1 - FLESHY"

stretch crushed velvet, medium density foam, polyester batting, spray polyurethane foam, resin, and cardboard

30 L X 30 H x 55 W cm

2019




"ABSTRACT ADAPTION"

terry cloth, stretch crushed velvet, faux animal skin, metallic/ hologram 
fabric, cotton, foam batting, and embroidery thread

180 L X 70 H X 3 W cm

2019




DETAIL Nº 2




DETAIL Nº 3








"SHRINE NO. 4"

2-component A1 composite resin, paint

46 L X 52 H X 4 D cm

2019




DETAIL Nº 4








"POURED DRIPS (LYNDA BENGLIS)"

velvet, stretch crushed velvet, stretch velvet, satin, medium pile fleece, 
foam batting, cotton, and embroidery thread

180 L x 170 H x 4 W cm

2019





photo: Quinten Buijsse




DETAIL Nº 5





"SUPERNATURAL"
SOLO SHOW

FRANKRIJKLEI 51
2000 ANTWERP, BELGIUM

MARCH 15 - APRIL 6, 2019

SUPERNATURAL is part of an ever-evolving body of work that bears witness to the artist’s intense relationship with materials and her interest in issues such as the migration of forms, pop and material culture, internalized violence, exuberance, and the enduring ambiguous presence - “ghosts” - of histories. Executed via the plasticity of foam, textiles, and 2-composite materials, the SUPERNATURAL series are sculptures of biomorphic, abstracting, and rectilinear entities, radiating information in non-narrative ways, existing in lives outside human consciousness. These nomadic elements, drifting through time and space, are extracted from a vast visual and audio bank compiled by the artist. They reveal a myriad of ongoing preoccupations including Brutalist architecture of electrical power and telecommunications, children’s television programming, exotica for armchair safari-ers, frontier idioms, architecture between the world wars such as streamline modernism, funk and soul music, toys, and the creativity of “passing” to avoid stigma. She makes a visual and conceptual link, for example, between the physical manifestation of internalized violence and the formalism of certain hybrid plastic injection molded toys, equating both to the grotesque (deformation bodies, tortured souls). In this sense, her forms are analytical and emotive, an exercise in social dissection that inhabits a haunting formalism, heightened by tactility, bouts of scale, and a visceral use of texture and color.