Toronto's Homework Policy

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

 

 

 

 Report No. 03-08-1245 

 RTS No. 216 

 

TORONTO DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD 

 

REVISED POLICY P.036: HOMEWORK  

 

TO Program and School Services Ctte 

 02 April 2008 

RECOMMENDATION 

 It is recommended that revised policy P.036: Homework, as 

appended to the report, be adopted. 

 

RATIONALE 

 On June 27, 2007, the Board decided: 

That staff consult with students, parents, teachers, 

principals, and superintendents of education to ob- 

tain feedback as to perceptions and experiences, is- 

sues and concerns around homework, the Board’s 

policy P.036, Homework, and present a report pro- 

viding: 

(i) a summary of the feedback; 

(ii) comment on the assignment of homework, and 

including an examination of the quantity and 

appropriateness of homework tasks, and of the 

times (such as during holidays) when home- 

work is assigned; 

(iii) recommendations on revisions to the policy and 

operational procedure. 

 

The Board’s homework policy P.036  was adopted in 1999. At that 

time, the Province of Ontario had just eliminated OAC and redis- 

tributed the expectations of the provincial curriculum. Information 

on effective instructional practice was just emerging and home- 

work policies across the province focused on defining the purpose 

of homework, identifying types of homework, providing time 

guidelines by grade for homework and outlining the roles and re- 

sponsibilities of students, teachers and parents to ensure homework 

completion. 

  

Over the past decade, there has been more research about: 

the process of student learning and effective teaching;   

the connection between homework and student achievement and 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

 

 

the development of lifelong learning skills, and 

the impact of homework on our classrooms and families. 

 

As a result, staff is proposing consideration of a revised Home- 

work policy that reflects these new understandings and shared be- 

liefs. 

 

The revised Homework policy has been informed by question- 

naires and consultations held with students, parents/guardians, 

teachers, administrators and trustees. It brings clarification across 

the Board to the practice of assigning effective, meaningful and 

relevant homework that supports student learning.  

 

   

RESOURCES 

 Implementation of the revised policy requires no new resources. 

 

IMPLEMENTATION 

AND REVIEW 

 

If the policy is approved, changes would be implemented for the 

2008-09 school year.  Impacts of the changes will be monitored 

through local school measures.  

 

APPENDICES Appendix A: Revised:  Homework Policy 

 Appendix B: Summary of Homework Policy Changes 

 Appendix C: Current:  Homework Policy P.036 CUR 

 Appendix D: Homework Consultation Process 

 Appendix E: Homework Policy Implementation and Communi- 

cation Plan  

 Appendix F: Community Consultation Homework Package 

(Powerpoint Presentation,  Homework Question- 

naire, Bibliography) 

 Appendix G:  Responses to Homework Questionnaire 

 Appendix H Homework Research Overview (Executive Sum- 

mary) 

 Appendix I: Provincial and International Homework Policy and 

Practice Review 

  

FROM Executive Superintendent Melanie Parrack at 416-397-3190  (or 

Melanie.parrack@tdsb.on.ca) or System Superintendent-Program 

Karen Grose at 416-397-3851 (or Karen.grose@tdsb.on.ca) 

 

ROUTING Executive Planning and Priorities Ctte 25 March 2008 

Program and School Services Ctte 02 April 2008 

Board 16 April 2008 

 

 

E03(Homework Report)zs.3378, School Services – Program, 

Last update: 28 March, 2008 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix A 

 

Proposed Revised Policy 

TITLE: HOMEWORK 

1.0 OBJECTIVE 

To establish the Board’s belief that homework is an engaging and relevant learning activ- 

ity.  To establish the Board’s commitment to the assignment of homework in a purpose- 

fully planned manner that is directly connected to a student’s school program and learning 

expectations of the Ontario Curriculum.  

2.0 DEFINITIONS 

Homework  is an out-of-classroom learning experience assigned by a teacher to enhance 

student learning.  Homework should be reviewed by teachers so that they know where stu- 

dents are now and how to better direct them towards their learning goals.   

There are four types of commonly assigned homework, each having a different intended 

outcome as shown below. 

Type Definition Intended Outcome Application 

Completion Any work assigned dur- 

ing the school day not 

completed in class 

Helps students keep up 

to date with the class- 

room program 

The classroom program 

should be differentiated 

if a student has comple- 

tion homework on a 

regular basis. 

Practice Any work that reviews 

and reinforces skills and 

concepts taught in class 

Helps students practice 

newly acquired skills to 

develop fluency 

To be effective, practice 

homework requires stu- 

dents to already be able 

to independently per- 

form the skills required. 

Preparation Any work that prepares 

students for upcoming 

lessons or classes 

Encourages students to 

acquire background in- 

formation or to bring 

their prior knowledge 

and experiences to up- 

coming units of study 

 

Extension 

Any work that explores 

and refines learning in 

new contexts or inte- 

grates and expands on 

classroom learning 

Encourages students to 

problem solve, think 

creatively and think 

critically 

To be effective, exten- 

sion homework does not 

require a student to 

learn curriculum content 

independently. Instead, 

students deepen under- 

standing and relate 

learning to the real 

world. 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix A 

 

3.0 POLICY 

Effective Homework Assignments 

3.1. Homework assignments shall be clearly articulated and carefully planned, and in- 

volve consultation among core, rotary and subject teachers, where appropriate.  Also 

where appropriate, homework assignments shall be differentiated to reflect the 

unique needs of the child.  

3.2. The purpose of all types of homework is to ensure it is both effective in promoting 

high quality student learning and achievement and it nurtures a desire for students to 

keep learning.  Effective homework assignments:  

(a) are curriculum based and meet the developmental and individual needs of the 

student through differentiation and modification.  

(b) should be commented on to provide feedback for future learning. 

(c) are designed to require no additional teaching outside the classroom and are 

engaging and relevant to student learning. Students understand what is ex- 

pected of them before leaving school. 

(d) do not require resources or technology to which students may not have access. 

(e) may be designed to involve parents/guardians in supporting their children’s 

learning but should not teach new concepts.  

Consequences for Incomplete Homework Assignments 

3.3. If homework is not completed, consequences shall not be punitive.  There is no con- 

nection between punitive measures and student achievement, punitive measures ac- 

tually provide powerful disincentives.   

Reporting of Homework 

3.4. Homework is reported on only the Learning Skills Section of the Elementary Provin- 

cial Report Card as a part of Independent Work and Homework Completion and on 

the Secondary Report Card as part of the Works Independently and Work Hab- 

its/Homework.   

Timing, Scheduling and Quantity of Homework 

The amount of homework assigned to students should be different from elementary, to 

middle school to high school and that the amount of time a student spends on assigned 

homework depends on such factors as: the student’s needs, learning ability,  subject, 

school schedule, proximity to tests, examinations and assigned homework due dates.   

Time spent on homework should be balanced with the importance of personal and family 

wellness and the wide array of family obligations experienced in our society today.  

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix A 

 

3.5. Kindergarten 

Homework should not be assigned to Kindergarten students.  There is a strong con- 

nection between parental involvement and student achievement.  As a result, families 

are encouraged to engage in early learning activities such as playing, talking and 

reading together in English or in the family’s first language.  Teachers may provide 

resources to support home-based early learning activities.   

3.6. Grades 1 to 6 

There is a strong connection between reading to or with elementary children every 

day in English or in one’s first language and student achievement.  As a result, 

homework assigned in the early grades shall more often take the form of reading, 

playing a variety of games, having discussions and interactive activities such as 

building and cooking with the family.  In the late Primary and Junior grades, effec- 

tive homework may begin to take the form of independent work.  In both cases, 

homework assigned for completion, practice, preparation or extension should be 

clearly articulated and differentiated to reflect the unique needs of the child. 

3.7. Grades 7 to 8 

Completion of homework for middle school-aged students can contribute to im- 

proved student achievement.  Homework assignments for completion, practice, 

preparation or extension for students in Grades 7 and 8 shall be clearly articulated 

and carefully planned, in partnership among core and rotary teachers.  Estimated 

completion time should be one hour or less.   

3.8. Grades 9 to 12 

Completion of homework can contribute to improved student achievement, particu- 

larly in the upper grades.  Homework assignments for students in Grades 9 to 12 

shall be clearly articulated and carefully planned with an estimated completion time 

of two hours or less.  Homework stress is particularly prevalent amongst families 

with children transitioning between major school levels.  As a result, homework, es- 

pecially for Grade 9 students, should be carefully planned in partnership among sub- 

ject teachers.   

General 

3.9. No homework shall be assigned on scheduled holidays as outlined in the school year 

calendar or on days of significance. 

3.10. Wherever possible, homework assignments shall be assigned to be returned using 

blocks of time so that families can best support homework completion by balancing 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix A 

 

the time required to complete homework with extra curricular activities scheduled 

outside of the school day and activities that support personal and family wellness.   

Parents who have concerns with homework expectations for their child shall be en- 

couraged to contact their child’s teacher or the school principal to discuss the situa- 

tion. 

3.11. See also policy P063: Pre-examination Moratorium on Major Assignments and Ac- 

tivities, adopted June 27, 2007 

Homework During Extended Absences 

3.12. Teachers shall not be expected to provide detailed classroom work and homework 

assignments to students who are absent for extended periods of time other than days 

of significance or scheduled school holidays.  For absences due to extended illness, 

parents may contact the school principal to discuss available options. 

Roles and Responsibilities  

A positive and open school-home partnership will have a positive impact on student suc- 

cess in the homework process.  

(a) School staff are responsible for: 

(i) communicating school homework guidelines early in the school year for 

use by teachers, parents and students; 

(ii) coordinating school wide resources and practices that support home- 

work, e.g. use of agenda, library facilities, academic support programs, 

ensuring effective communication between rotary teachers so that a rea- 

sonable amount of homework is being assigned; and 

(iii) providing information to parents on the purpose of effective homework 

and sharing practices that will help families support their children (for 

example: newsletters, open houses, and websites). 

(b) Teachers are responsible for: 

(i) encouraging a partnership with family and students that promotes timely, 

regular communication and supports families in the homework process; 

(ii) designing homework assignments that clearly articulate their purpose 

and expected outcome; 

(iii) sharing expectations for homework with students and parents early in the 

school year; 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix A 

 

(iv) ensuring any homework assigned is directly related to classroom instruc- 

tion and consists of clear, purposeful and engaging and activities; 

(v) assigning homework that is appropriate to the student’s age, develop- 

mental level, learning style, skills and individual needs; 

(vi) teaching the skills necessary for the student to complete the homework 

and become successful independent learners; and 

(vii) articulating and carefully planning homework in partnership with core 

and rotary teachers. 

(c) Students are responsible for: 

(i) ensuring that he/she clearly understands the homework assigned, i.e. as- 

signments, criteria, and timelines, and asks for clarification or assistance 

from the teacher when homework assignments or the expectations are 

not clear; 

(ii) recording assignments in his/her agenda or student planner; 

(iii) regularly completing assigned homework in a timely manner to the best 

of his/her ability; and 

(iv) managing time and materials, e.g. by bringing home necessary materials. 

(d) The family is responsible for: 

(i) reading in English, French (French Immersion) and/or the family’s first 

language throughout the elementary years of their children’s education; 

(ii) providing an environment, i.e. workplace, block of uninterrupted time, 

usually in the home or in an alternative setting such as a homework club 

for homework to be done; 

(iii) providing encouragement and appropriate support without doing the 

homework for their child;  

(iv) providing a healthy balance between homework, co-curricular activities 

and family commitments; 

(v) stopping their child from continuing to complete homework at bedtime, 

even if the child is not done,; and 

(vi) contacting the classroom teacher if their child is not consistently able to 

do the homework by him/herself or if challenges or questions arise. 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix B 

 

 

Summary of Homework Policy Changes 

 

 

 Current Policy Proposed Policy 

Types of Homework Four types and their rationales 

identified 

Four types defined, with identifi- 

cation of specific intended out- 

comes and application for effec- 

tiveness in learning. 

Suggests 10 minutes per grade 

Quantity of assigned homework 

differentiated by division/grade, 

and reflects unique learning needs 

of individual students. 

Requests teachers to be aware of 

days of significance 

Ensures no homework is assigned 

on days of significance or sched- 

uled holidays in the school year 

calendar 

(Not applicable) 

Requires homework to be as- 

signed in blocks of time to sup- 

port flexibility in balancing time 

for family activities 

(Not applicable) 

Consistent with Pre- Examination 

Moratorium on Major Assign- 

ments and Activities (Policy P. 

063SCH)  

Timing, Scheduling, 

and Quantity of 

Homework 

(Not applicable) Addresses homework and ex- 

tended absences during the school 

year 

Roles and Responsi- 

bilities 

Identifies roles and responsibilities 

of the school, teacher, parent and 

student 

Identifies roles and responsibili- 

ties of the school, teacher, student 

and family. Roles and responsi- 

bilities are balanced and aligned 

with the content of proposed 

Homework Policy. 

 

 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix C 

 

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Program and School Services Committee  

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Appendix C 

 

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Appendix C 

 

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Appendix C 

 

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Appendix D 

 

Homework Consultation Process 

 

On June 27, 2007, the Board decided: that staff consult with students, parents, teachers, princi- 

pals and superintendents of education to obtain feedback as to the perceptions and experiences, 

issues and concerns around homework, the Board’s Policy P.036, Homework, and present a re- 

port providing: 

 

1. A summary of the feedback; 

2. Comment on the assignment of homework, and including an examination of the quantity 

and appropriateness of homework tasks, and of the times (such as during holidays) when 

homework is assigned; 

3. Recommendations on revisions to the policy and operational procedure. 

 

In late Fall 2007: 

Homework Policies in five large urban boards across the province were reviewed 

A sampling of TDSB school based Homework Policies were reviewed 

A research review focused on homework was conducted  

The results of Canada’s two most recent national surveys for parents on homework  (The 

Canadian Study of Homework Realities 2007, The Survey of Canadian Attitudes toward 

Learning, 2007) were reviewed 

  Student perceptions, experiences, issues and concerns captured in the 2007 TDSB Stu- 

dent Census, Grade 7-12, were reviewed.  

 

In Winter 2008: 

A series of stakeholder consultations carefully crafted to obtain feedback as to the perceptions, 

experiences, issues and concerns our staff, parents/guardians and community partners have 

around homework took place as follows: 

 

NE Quad Community Meeting, February 5, 2008, Agnes McPhail P.S. 

SE Quad Community Meeting, February 7, 2008, Oakridge Jr P.S. 

SW Quad Community Meeting, February 11, 2008, Central Technical School 

NW Quad Community Meeting, February 13, 2008, HJ Alexander C.S. 

 

Please note that each Ward’s Equity Policy Advisory Committee (EPAC), Parent Involvement 

Advisory Committee (PIAC), Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC) and French as a 

Second Language Advisory Committee (FSLAC) representatives were invited to attend the Quad 

Community Meetings.  

 

Early Years Steering Committee, February 14, 2008 

Inner City Advisory Committee, February 15, 2008 

TDSB Program Liaison Committee, February 19, 2008 

Early Years Advisory Council, February 28, 2008 

Elementary Teachers Toronto (ETT), Elementary Concerns Table, February 28, 2008 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix D 

 

Ontario Secondary School Teachers Federation District Twelve (OSSTF D12), Secondary Con- 

sultation Committee Meetings, February 29, 2008  

Continuing Education International Languages Advisory Committee, March 3, 2008 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix E 

 

Homework Policy Implementation and Communication Plan 

 

 

Timeline 

 

 

Communication  

Responsibility 

 

April 2008  Immediate Communication:  

  

Press Release  Communications 

  

Director’s Blog  Communications 

  

TDSB Website  Communications 

  

TDSB Program Site  Program 

  

TEL Conferences  Program 

  

Required Changes for Common Pages in Stu- 

dent Agenda 2008 - 2009 

 

Communications 

  

Required Translations of Homework Policy 

 

Student and Community 

Equity 

 

 

May 2008 

 

 

FOS Meeting 

 

Superintendents of Edu- 

cation/Program Dept. 

  

Staff Meeting 

 

Principal 

  

School Council Meeting 

 

Principal 

 

August 2008  Professional Development at Summer Insti- 

tutes: 

 

Program 

  

Beginning Teachers, Orientation Program (Au- 

gust 12 – 14) 

 

Program 

  

Elementary and Secondary Teachers,  

(August 19 – 21) 

 

Program 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix E 

 

  

New Administrators Orientation Program (Au- 

gust 20 – 21) 

 

Program 

  

CL/ACL Program (August 25) 

 

Program 

  

Elementary POR Program (August 26) 

 

Program 

 

September 2008  New TDSB Homework Policy Implementation 

(now applicable): 

 

  

FOS Meeting  Superintendents 

  

Staff Meeting  Principals 

  

School Council Meeting  Principals 

  

Ongoing Professional Development and Sup- 

port 

 

 

Program Department 

 

 

 

Appendix D 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix F 

 

Community Consultation Homework Package 

 

1. PowerPoint Presentation 

 

2. Homework Questionnaire 

 

3. Bibliography 

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Appendix F 

 

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Appendix F 

 

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Program and School Services Committee  

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Program and School Services Committee  

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Appendix F 

 

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Program and School Services Committee  

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Appendix F 

 

 

1. Homework Questionnaire 2008 

I am responding as a (please circle):  

 

 

Parent         Teacher         Administrator         SOE         Trustee  

 

 

If you are responding as a parent, please circle the answer 

that applies to your child/children: 

 

 

Child One:  Grade    K-3 4-8 9-12  Gender: M F  

 

Specialized Program: French Immersion, Extended French, 

Arts, Athletic, Special Education, other, __________ 

 

Child Two:  Grade   K-3 4-8 9-12  Gender: M F  

 

Specialized Program: French Immersion, Extended French, 

Arts, Athletic, Special Education, other, ___________ 

 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix F 

 

Types of Homework 

 

 

 

1. What kind of homework does/do your child/students have? (please circle as many 

responses as applicable) 

 

Child One 

a) completing classroom work from that school day 

b) drill and practice 

c) studying for tests 

d) opportunities for creative extensions that promote critical thinking and problem 

solving 

e) projects 

   

 

Child Two 

a) completing classroom work from that school day 

b) drill and practice 

c) studying for tests 

d) opportunities for creative extensions that promote critical thinking and problem 

solving 

e) projects 

 

 

2. What effect do you believe homework is having on your child’s/student’s  aca- 

demic  achievement? 

 

 

Child One   Very negative  1 2 3 4 5 very positive  

 

Child Two  Very negative  1 2 3 4 5 very positive  

 

 

3. What effect do you believe homework is having on the characteristics you identi- 

fied as wanting your children/students to have for the rest of their lives? 

 

 

Child One   Very negative  1 2 3 4 5 very positive  

 

Child Two  Very negative  1 2 3 4 5 very positive  

 

 

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April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix F 

 

4. My child’s/student’s homework is meaningful and relevant to their learning. 

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

5. My child/students finds his/her homework enjoyable. 

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

Additional Comments: 

Experiences/ Information 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix F 

 

Quantity and Timing of Homework 

 

1. On average, how much time does your child spend on homework each night?  

 (please circle)  

 

Child One less than 10 min 10-20 min 20–30 min 30-40 min 40-50 min 

  50-60 min  60-80 min 80-100 min 100-120 min  Over 120 min 

 

Child Two less than 10 min 10-20 min 20–30 min 30-40 min 40-50 min 

  50-60 min  60-80 min 80-100 min 100-120 min  Over 120 min 

 

2. Is your child’s homework assigned to be returned the next day? 

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

3. My child has too much homework. 

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

4. I believe my child should have more homework. 

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

5.  My child is assigned homework over the weekend.   

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

6. Besides “for pleasure reading”, should homework be assigned over the weekend for:  

 

Elementary Students  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

  

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix F 

 

Secondary Students  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

7. My child is assigned homework over vacations/holidays.  

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

 

8. Besides “for pleasure reading”, should homework be assigned over vacation or 

scheduled holidays for: 

 

Elementary Students  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Secondary Students  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

 

 

Additional Comments: 

Experiences/ Information 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix F 

 

Impact of Homework on Our Families 

(To be completed by parents only) 

 

1.  I assist my child with homework. 

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

2. My involvement with homework is positive.  

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

3. My involvement with homework is negative.  

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

4. What is your child’s attitude toward homework? (please circle) 

 

Child One enthusiastic  willingly  grudgingly  somewhat  very  

    cooperative cooperative  resistant resistant 

 

Child Two enthusiastic  willingly grudgingly  somewhat  very  

    cooperative cooperative  resistant resistant 

 

 

5. My child experiences stress related to homework assignments. (e.g. nervousness, 

anxiety, crying)  

 

Child One Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

 

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Program and School Services Committee  

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Appendix F 

 

6. What is your attitude towards the assignment of homework? 

 

Child One Very Negative  1 2 3 4 5 Very Positive 

    

Child Two  Very Negative  1 2 3 4 5 Very Positive 

 

7. How does your child’s relationship with homework affect your family. 

 

Child One  Very Negatively 1 2 3 4 5 Very Positively 

  

Child Two  Very Negatively 1 2 3 4 5 Very Positively 

 

 

 

8. My child’s homework interferes with other activities. (i.e. co-curricular activity, 

 outside interests, dinner with family, household chores, time with friends, reading 

 for pleasure,  downtime, playing, sleep) 

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Comments: 

Experiences/ Information 

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Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix F 

 

Resources to Support Homework  

 

1. My child is assigned homework that requires family assistance. 

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

2. How frequently does your child get help with homework. (i.e. from you, a 

 brother/sister/adult, paid tutor)? 

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

3. I am clearly informed about my child’s homework assignments. (i.e. agenda, news- 

letters, phone calls, website) 

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

4. My child has access to a computer/the internet. 

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

5. My child is required to use a computer/the internet to do homework. 

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 2 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix F 

 

 

6. What other resources do you or your child draw on to help with homework?  

 (please circle) 

 

Resources from school,  community library,  books available at home,   other,  _____________ 

 

 

7. Do you feel comfortable helping your child with homework? 

 

Child One  Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

Child Two Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Comments: 

Experiences/ Information 

 3 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix F 

 

Impact of Homework on Our Classrooms 

(To be completed by Teachers, Administrators and Superintendents only) 

 

 

1. My students complete homework as assigned. 

  

 Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always  

 

 

2. I feel pressure from parents/caregivers to provide daily homework. 

 

 Never  1 2 3 4 5 Always 

 

3. I see signs of stress in my students related to homework completion. (please circle) 

  

 no  a few   some  many  all  

 students students students students students 

 

4. What is the general effect of homework completion on the teaching and learning in 

 your classroom? 

 

 Very negative  1 2 3 4 5 Very positive  

 

 

5. Have you had conversation with colleagues around the creation of meaningful 

homework assignments? 

 

 Very rarely  1 2 3 4 5 Very frequently 

 

6.  Have you had conversation with parents around the creation of meaningful home- 

work assignments? 

 

 Very rarely  1 2 3 4 5 Very frequently 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Comments: 

Experiences/ Information 

 4 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix F 

 

Homework - Bibliography 

 

Cameron, Dr. Linda, and Bartel, Dr. Lee. (2008) Homework realities: A Canadian study of paren- 

tal opinions and attitudes.  Toronto: OISE.  Retrieved online February 26, 2008 from 

http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/oise/UserFiles/File/cameron_bartel_report.pdf 

 

Canadian Council on Learning. 2007 Survey of Canadian attitudes toward learning: Results for 

elementary and secondary school learning: Canadian Attitudes towards homework: The role of 

homework in structured learning. Retrieved online February 26, 2008, from http://search.ccl- 

cca.ca/CCL/Reports/SCAL/StructuredLearning/SCALStructuredHomework.htm?Language=EN 

 

Cooper, Harris M. (2007). The battle over homework: Common ground for administrators, teach- 

ers and parents.  3rd ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.   371.30281 Coo 2007 

 

Cooper, Harris. (2001, Apr.). Homework for all – in moderation. Educational Leadership, 58(7), 

34-38. 

 

Cooper, Harris. (1989, Nov.). Synthesis of research on homework. Educational Leadership, 47(3), 

85. 

 

Cooper, Harris, Jackson, Kristina, Nye, Barbara, & Lindsay, James J. (2001, Winter). A model of 

homework’s influence on the performance evaluations of elementary school students. Journal of 

Experimental Education, 69(2), 181-200. 

 

Cooper, Harris, Lindsay, J.L., Nye B., & Greathouse, S. (1998). Relationships among attitudes 

about homework, amount of homework assigned and completed, and student achievement.  Journal 

of Educational Psychology, 90(1), 70-83. 

 

Cooper, Harris, Robinson, Jorgianne Civey, & Patall, Erika A. (2006, Spring).  Does homework 

improve academic achievement?: A Synthesis of the Research, 1987-2003.  Review of Educational 

Research, 76(1), 1-42.    

 

Cooper, Harris, & Valentine, Jeffrey C. (2001). Using research to answer practical questions about 

homework. Educational Psychologist, 36(3), 143-153. 

 

Coutts, Pamela M. (2004, Summer). Meanings of homework and implications for practice. Theory 

into Practice, 43(3), 182-188. 

 

Darling-Hammond, Linda, & Ifill-Lynch, Olivia. (2006, Feb.).  If  they’d only do their work! Edu- 

cational Leadership,  63(5), 8-13.  

 

 5 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix F 

 

Davies, Philippa. The Homework Debate: When is it just too much? Professionally Speaking

Ontario College of Teachers.  Retrieved online February 26, 2008 from 

http://www.oct.ca/publications/professionally_speaking/june_2001/feature.asp 

 

Foyle, Harvey. (1989). Homework: Research, policy and implementation. ERIC document 

ED303919. Retrieved online February 26, 2008 from 

http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/1e/66/35.p 

df 

 

Foyle, Harvey. (1993, Apr.). Is homework an effective tool? NASSP Bulletin, 77 (552), 96-98. 

 

Heitzmann, Ray.  (2007, Mar.).  Target HOMEWORK to maximize learning. The Education Di- 

gest, 72(7), 40-43.    

 

Jackson, Bruce. (2007, Sept.). Homework inoculation and the limits of research. Phi Delta Kappan, 

89(1), 55-59. 

 

Kohn, Alfie. (2006, Sept.).  Abusing research: The study of homework and other examples. Phi 

Delta Kappan, 88(1), 9-22.    

 

Kohn, Alfie. (2007, Winter). Changing the homework default. Independent School, 66(2) 58-65. 

 

Kohn, Alfie, (2007). Digging themselves in deeper: More misleading claims about the value of 

homework.  Phi Delta Kappan, 88(7), 514.  

 

Kohn, Alfie. (2006, Sept.).  Down with Homework.  Instructor, 116(2), 43-45, 68.      

 

Kohn, Alfie. (2006). The homework myth: why our kids get too much of a bad thing. Cambridge, 

MA: Da Capo Life Long. 371.30281 Koh 

 

Kohn, Alfie. (2007, Spring). The truth about homework. Our Schools, Our Selves, 16 (3), 77-84. 

 

Kralovec, Etta, & Buell, John. (2001, Apr.). End homework now. Educational Leadership. 58(7), 

39-42. 

 

Kralovec, Etta, & Buell, John. (2000). The end of homework: How much homework disrupts fami- 

lies, overburdens children & limits learning. Boston, MA: Beacon. 371.30281 Kra 

 

Marshall, Bethan. (1999, December 17.). How anxiety makes for a lot of homework. The Times Educa- 

tional Supplement, (4355),  13. Retrieved online February 26, 2008 from 

http://www.tes.co.uk/search/story/?story_id=305296 

 

Marzano, Robert J., & Pickering, Debra J. (2007, Mar.).  The case for and against homework.  

Educational  Leadership, 64 (6), 74-79.   

 6 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix F 

 

 

Marzano, Robert J., & Pickering, Debra J. (2007, Mar.). Errors and Allegations about research on 

homework. Phi Delta Kappan, 88 (7), 507, 513. 

 

Marzano, Robert J., & Pickering, Debra J. (2007). Response to Kohn’s allegations. Centennial, 

CO: Marzano & Associates.  Retrieved February 26, 2008 from  

http://marzanoandassociates.com/documents/KohnResponse.pdf 

 

Murphy, Joseph, & Decker, Karen. (1989, May/Jun.). Teachers’ use of homework in high school. 

Journal of Educational Research, 82(5), 261-269. 

 

Murphy, Joseph, & Decker, Karen. (1990, Feb.). Homework use at the high school level: Implica- 

tions for principals. NASSP Bulletin, 74(523), 40-43.  

 

Philp, Margaret. (2006, October 21). Homework does not make the grade: Or does it? Globe and 

Mail, p. F1. 

Retrieved from CPI.Q (Canadian Periodicals) Thomson Gale . 

 

Schipani, Denise. (2006, Dec.). Can homework backfire? Scholastic Parent & Child, 14(4), 37-38. 

 

Shellard, Elizabeth G., & Turner, Jennifer R. (2004). Homework: Research and best practice. ERS 

Focus On, 1-20. 

 

Simplicio, Joseph S.C. (2005, Fall).  Homework in the 21st century: The antiquated and ineffectual 

implementation of a time honored educational strategy.  Education, 126(1), 138-142.     

 

Thomas, Ann Hill. (1992). Homework: How effective?: How much to assign?: The need for clear 

policies. Oregon School Study Council Bulletin (36:1). Eugene, OR: Oregon School Study Coun- 

cil.    371.30281 Tho 

 

Toronto Star. Homework: A homewrecker: Report. Retrieved online February 26, 2008 

http://www.thestar.com/printArticle/302001 

 

Toronto Star. ‘Up with play, down with homework’. Retrieved online February 26, 2008  

http://www.thestar.com/printArticle/248435 

 

Trautwein, Ulrich, Ludtke, Oliver, Kastens, Claudia, & Koller, Olaf. (2006, Jul.). Effort on home- 

work in grades 5-9: Development, motivational antecedents, and the association with effort on 

classwork. Child Development, 77(4), 1094-1111. 

 

Trautwein, Ulrich, & Koller, Olaf. (2003). The relationship between homework and achievement – 

Still much of a mystery.  Educational Psychology Review, 15(2), 115-145. 

 

 7 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix F 

 

TVO Parents.com. Podcasts.culture.ca. May 8 2007: The great homework debate. Retrieved online 

February 26, 2008  http://podcasts.culture.ca/explore/show/237657 

 

TVO Parents.com. Homework: Are kids doing too much? Retrieved online February 26, 2008 

http://www.tvo.org/cfmx/tvoorg/tvoparents/index.cfm?page_id=146&article_title_url=Homework 

AreKidsDoing- 

TooMuch&article_id=21&flag=&articleSearchTerm=&published=&theme_id=0&search=&flag1 

=&CFID=20365&CFTOKEN=10683758 

 

Van Voorhis, Frances L (2004, Summer). Reflecting on the Homework Ritual: Assignments and 

designs. Theory into Practice 43(3), 205-212. 

 

 A18(PL/bib/Homework)ra:6335 

 8 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix G 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toronto District School Board 

 

 

 

Responses to 

Homework Questionnaire 

2008 

 

 

 

 9 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix G 

 

 

Demographic Information 

 

 

Of the 326 participants who completed questionnaires, 79% identified themselves as parents,  

37% identified themselves as Teachers, 19% identified themselves as Administrators, 4% identi- 

fied themselves as Superintendents of Education and 0.3% identified themselves as a Trustee. 

 

 

194 participants responded as a parent of one child. Of these 194 responses, 37% identified their 

child in Kindergarten- Grade 3, 42% identified their child in Grade 4-8 and 20% identified their 

child in Grade 9-12.  Of these 194 children, 45% were identified as male, 38% were identified as 

female and 17% were not identified by gender. Of these 194 children,  

 11% were identified as in a French Immersion Program, 5% were identified as in a Extended 

French Program, 2% were identified as in an Arts Program, 1% were identified as in an Athletic 

Program, 5% were identified as in a Special Education Program and 7% were identified as in 

Other Programs. 

 

 

113 participants responded as a parent of two children. Of these 113 responses, 28% identified 

their child in Kindergarten- Grade 3, 46% identified their child in Grade 4-8 and 25% identified 

their child in Grade 9-12. Of these 113 children, 49% were identified as male, 36% were identi- 

fied as female and 15% were not identified by gender.  Of these 113 children, 10% were identi- 

fied as in a French Immersion Program, 7% were identified as in a Extended French Program, 

2% were identified as in an Arts Program, 2% were identified as in an Athletic Program, 4% 

were identified as in a Special Education Program and 4% were identified as in Other Programs. 

 

Types of Homework 

 

1. What kind of homework does/do your child/students have? (please circle as many 

responses as applicable) 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades K–3, 41% said completing classroom 

work from  

that school day, 77% said drill and practice, 45% said studying for tests, 30% said oppor- 

tunities for creative extensions that promote critical thinking and problem solving and 

37% said projects. 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 70% said completing classroom 

work from  

that school day, 65% said drill and practice, 83% said studying for tests, 48% said oppor- 

tunities for creative extensions that promote critical thinking and problem solving and 

82% said projects. 

 10 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix G 

 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9-12, 64% said completing classroom 

work from that school day, 71% said drill and practice, 92% said studying for tests, 52% 

said opportunities for creative extensions that promote critical thinking and problem solv- 

ing and 85% said projects. 

 

2. What effect do you believe homework is having on your child’s/ student’s academic 

achievement? 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 9% said very negative, 15% nega- 

tive,  

36% somewhat positive, 18% positive and 20% very positive. 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4–8, 9% said very negative, 13% nega- 

tive,  

35% somewhat positive, 22% positive and 20% very positive. 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 8% said very negative, 11% nega- 

tive,  

39% somewhat positive, 29% positive and 12% very positive. 

 

3. What effect do you believe homework is having on the characteristics you identified 

as wanting your children/students to have for the rest of their lives? 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 13% said very negative, 15% nega- 

tive,  

 

 30% somewhat positive, 26% positive and 15% very positive. 

 

 

  

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 11% said very negative, 17% nega- 

tive,  

 

 23% somewhat positive, 21% positive and 25% very positive. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9-12, 11% said very negative, 20% nega- 

tive,  20% somewhat positive, 33% positive and 15% very positive. 

 

4. My child’s/student’s homework is meaningful and relevant to their learning. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 1% responded never, 17% re- 

sponded rarely,  28% responded sometimes, 28% responded often and 23% responded al- 

ways. 

 11 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix G 

 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 5% responded never, 13% responded 

rarely,  25% responded sometimes, 29% responded often and 26% responded always. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 3% responded never, 23% re- 

sponded rarely,  23% responded sometimes, 36% responded often and 14% responded al- 

ways. 

 

5. My child/students finds his/her homework enjoyable. 

  

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 12% responded never, 17% re- 

sponded rarely,  28% responded sometimes, 23% responded often and 15% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 20% responded never, 21% re- 

sponded rarely,  29% responded sometimes, 13% responded often and 14% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 20% responded never, 27% re- 

sponded rarely,  24% responded sometimes, 20% responded often and 3% responded al- 

ways. 

 

Quantity and Timing of Homework 

 

1. On average, how much time does your child spend on homework each night?  

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades K–3, 21% said less than 10 min, 36% said 

10- 20 min, 17% 20-30 min, 14% said 30-40 min , 1% said 40-50 min, 3% said 50-60 min, 

1% said 60-80 min, 1% said 80-100 min, 3% said 100-120 min and 1% said over 120 min. 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 8% said less than 10 min, 10% said 

10- 20 min, 9% 20-30 min, 17% said 30-40 min , 11% said 40-50 min, 14% said 50-60 

min, 14% said 60-80 min, 4% said 80-100 min, 7% said 100-120 min and 7% said over 

120 min. 

 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9-12, 2% said less than 10 min, 3% said 

10- 20 min, 8% 20-30 min, 12% said 30-40 min , 3% said 40-50 min, 14% said 50-60 

min, 15% said 60-80 min, 12% said 80-100 min, 8% said 100-120 min and 23% said over 

120 min. 

 

 

 

 12 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix G 

 

2. Is your child’s homework assigned to be returned the next day? 

  

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 28% responded never, 12% re- 

sponded rarely,  10% responded sometimes, 19% responded often and 29% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 7% responded never, 8% responded 

rarely,  24% responded sometimes, 26% responded often and 33% responded always. 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 9% responded never, 11% re- 

sponded rarely,  30% responded sometimes, 18% responded often and 30% responded al- 

ways. 

 

3. My child has too much homework. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 36% responded never, 12% re- 

sponded rarely,  24% responded sometimes, 10% responded often and 17% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 17% responded never, 27% re- 

sponded rarely,  21% responded sometimes, 16% responded often and 20% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 12% responded never, 9% re- 

sponded rarely,  27% responded sometimes, 17% responded often and 33% responded al- 

ways. 

 

4. I believe my child should have more homework. 

  

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 68% responded never, 11% re- 

sponded rarely,  10% responded sometimes, 5% responded often and 5% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 55% responded never, 12% re- 

sponded rarely,  19% responded sometimes, 5% responded often and 8% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 50% responded never, 14% re- 

sponded rarely,  18% responded sometimes, 9% responded often and 8% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 

 13 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix G 

 

 

5.  My child is assigned homework over the weekend. 

  

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 22% responded never, 7% re- 

sponded rarely,  17% responded sometimes, 11% responded often and 43% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 10% responded never, 10% re- 

sponded rarely,  14% responded sometimes, 25% responded often and 41% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 3% responded never, 6% re- 

sponded rarely,  17% responded sometimes, 17% responded often and 56% responded al- 

ways. 

 

6. Besides “for pleasure reading”, should homework be assigned over the weekend. 

 

 Elementary Students  

  

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-8, 32% responded never, 14% re- 

sponded rarely,  16% responded sometimes, 6% responded often and 6% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Secondary Students  

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9-12, 11% responded never, 8% re- 

sponded rarely,  16% responded sometimes, 10% responded often and 7% responded al- 

ways. 

 

7. My child is assigned homework over vacations/holidays. 

  

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 9% responded never, 4% responded 

rarely,  14% responded sometimes, 7% responded often and 5% responded always. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 21% responded never, 18% re- 

sponded rarely, 19% responded sometimes, 10% responded often and 26% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 12% responded never, 8% re- 

sponded rarely, 14% responded sometimes, 26% responded often and 38% responded al- 

ways. 

 14 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix G 

 

 

8. Besides “for pleasure reading”, should homework be assigned over vacation or 

scheduled holidays.  

 

 Elementary Students  

  Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-8, 54% responded never, 8% 

responded rarely, 7% responded sometimes, 2% responded often and 2% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Secondary Students  

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9-12, 29% responded never, 

8%responded rarely,  7% responded sometimes, 2% responded often and 2% responded 

always. 

 

 

 

Impact of Homework on Our Families 

(completed by parents only) 

 

1.  I assist my child with homework. 

  

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 4% responded never, 3% responded 

rarely,  8% responded sometimes, 17% responded often and 64% responded always. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 8% responded never, 17% responded 

rarely,  20% responded sometimes, 17% responded often and 32% responded always. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 12% responded never, 20% re- 

sponded rarely, 30% responded sometimes, 20% responded often and 17% responded al- 

ways. 

 

2. My involvement with homework is positive. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 2% responded never, 9% responded 

rarely,  20% responded sometimes, 25% responded often and 40% responded always. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 8% responded never, 8% responded 

 rarely,  23% responded sometimes, 20% responded often and 34% responded always. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 8% responded never, 17% re- 

sponded rarely, 30% responded sometimes, 21% responded often and 23% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 15 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix G 

 

3. My involvement with homework is negative. 

  

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 43% responded never, 21% re- 

sponded rarely, 18% responded sometimes, 10% responded often and 1% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 43% responded never, 15% re- 

sponded rarely, 20% responded sometimes, 5% responded often and 7% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 27% responded never, 23% re- 

sponded rarely, 27% responded sometimes, 11% responded often and 9% responded al- 

ways. 

 

4. What is your child’s attitude toward homework? 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 12% enthusiastic, 42% willingly 

cooperative, 22% grudgingly cooperative, 12% somewhat resistant and 9% very resistant. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 9% enthusiastic, 27% willingly co- 

operative, 31% grudgingly cooperative, 14% somewhat resistant and 13% very resistant. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 5% enthusiastic, 32% willingly co- 

operative, 35% grudgingly cooperative, 17% somewhat resistant and 11% very resistant. 

 

5. My child experiences stress related to homework assignments.(e.g. nervousness, 

anxiety, crying)  

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 38% responded never, 18% re- 

sponded rarely, 20% responded sometimes, 11% responded often and 9% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 26% responded never, 15% re- 

sponded rarely, 12% responded sometimes, 16% responded often and 23% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 23% responded never, 17% re- 

sponded rarely, 20% responded sometimes, 24% responded often and 15% responded al- 

ways. 

 

6. What is your attitude towards the assignment of homework? 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 23% very negative, 9% negative,  

 16 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix G 

 

 26% slightly positive, 17% positive and 20% very positive. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 13% very negative, 14% negative,  

 23% slightly positive, 16% positive and 27% very positive. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 12% very negative, 14% negative,  

 32% slightly positive, 30% positive and 11% very positive. 

 

7. How does your child’s relationship with homework affect your  family? 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 14% very negative, 23% negative,  

 31% slightly positive, 16% positive and 12% very positive. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 16% very negative, 16% negative,  

 28% slightly positive, 20% positive and 12% very positive. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 15% very negative, 20% negative,  

 38% slightly positive, 23% positive and 3% very positive. 

 

8. My child’s homework interferes with other activities.(i.e. co-curricular activity, out- 

side interests, dinner with family, household chores, time with friends, reading for 

pleasure, downtime, playing, and sleep) 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 28% responded never, 17% re- 

sponded rarely, 17% responded sometimes, 11% responded often and 22% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 13% responded never, 22% re- 

sponded rarely, 19% responded sometimes, 11% responded often and 27% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 6% responded never, 27% re- 

sponded rarely, 17% responded sometimes, 18% responded often and 30% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 

 17 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix G 

 

 

Resources to Support Homework 

 

1. My child is assigned homework that requires family assistance. 

  

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 9% responded never, 11% re- 

sponded rarely, 19% responded sometimes, 23% responded often and 34% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 14% responded never, 17% re- 

sponded rarely, 26% responded sometimes, 20% responded often and 19% responded al- 

ways. 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 20% responded never, 15% re- 

sponded rarely, 30% responded sometimes, 21% responded often and 12% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 

2. How frequently does your child get help with homework?(i.e. from you, a brother/ 

sister/adult, paid tutor) 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 6% responded never, 5% responded 

rarely,  12% responded sometimes, 25% responded often and 50% responded always. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 14% responded never, 18% re- 

sponded rarely, 19% responded sometimes, 19% responded often and 25% responded al- 

ways. 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 17% responded never, 15% re- 

sponded rarely, 26% responded sometimes, 29% responded often and 12% responded al- 

ways. 

 

3. I am clearly informed about my child’s homework assignments. (i.e. agenda, news- 

letters, phone calls, website) 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 3% responded never, 9% responded 

rarely,  16% responded sometimes, 20% responded often and 48% responded always. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 12% responded never, 20% re- 

sponded rarely, 15% responded sometimes, 10% responded often and 37% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 18 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix G 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 26% responded never, 21% re- 

sponded rarely, 17% responded sometimes, 15% responded often and 20% responded al- 

ways. 

 

4. My child has access to a computer/the internet. 

  

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 10% responded never, 2% re- 

sponded rarely, 6% responded sometimes, 4% responded often and 74% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 0% responded never, 2% responded 

rarely,  3% responded sometimes, 7% responded often and 86% responded always. 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 0% responded never, 0% re- 

sponded rarely, 0% responded sometimes, 6% responded often and 92% responded al- 

ways. 

 

5. My child is required to use a computer/the internet to do homework. 

  

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 64% responded never, 13% re- 

sponded rarely, 10% responded sometimes, 10% responded often and 2% responded al- 

ways. 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8, 11% responded never, 8% responded 

rarely,  23% responded sometimes, 30% responded often and 23% responded always. 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 3% responded never, 0% re- 

sponded rarely, 15% responded sometimes, 29% responded often and 50% responded al- 

ways. 

 

6. What other resources do you or your child draw on to help with homework? 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3, 35% resources from school, 36% 

community library, 53% books available at home and 17% other. 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4–8, 38% resources from school, 41% 

community library, 43% books available at home and 11% other. 

 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12, 33% resources from school, 32% 

community library, 39% books available at home and 11% other. 

 19 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix G 

 

 

7. Do you feel comfortable helping your child with homework? 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades K-3 - 1% responded never, 5% responded 

rarely,  3% responded sometimes, 17% responded often and 68% responded always 

 

 Of those who responded with respect to Grades 4-8 - 5% responded never, 7% responded 

 rarely,  

 10% responded sometimes, 15% responded often and 56% responded always 

Of those who responded with respect to Grades 9–12 - 2% responded never, 9% re- 

sponded rarely, 21% responded sometimes, 29% responded often and 36% responded al- 

ways.  

 

 

Impact of Homework on Our Classrooms 

(completed by Teachers, Administrators and Superintendents only) 

 

 

1. My students complete homework as assigned. 

 

 Of those who responded, 3% responded never, 6% responded rarely, 40% responded 

sometimes,  38% responded often and 10% responded always. 

 

2. I feel pressure from parents/caregivers to provide daily  homework. 

 

 Of those who responded, 13% responded never, 12% responded rarely, 21% responded 

sometimes,  28% responded often and 24% responded always.  

 

 

 

 

3. I see signs of stress in my students related to homework  completion. 

  

 Of those who responded, 7% responded no students, 26% responded a few students,  

 38% responded some students, 25% responded many students and 2% responded all stu- 

dents.  

 

 

4. What is the general effect of homework completion on the teaching and learning in 

your  classroom? 

  

 Of those who responded, 3% responded very negative, 12% responded negative,  

 38% responded somewhat positive, 30% responded positive and 10% responded very 

positive.  

 

 20 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix G 

 

  

5. Have you had conversation with colleagues around the creation of meaningful 

homework assignments? 

 

 Of those who responded, 10% responded very rarely, 9% responded rarely,  

 27% responded sometimes, 30% responded frequently and 22% responded very fre- 

quently.  

 

 

6.  Have you had conversation with parents around the creation of meaningful home- 

work assignments? 

 

 Of those who responded, 20% responded very rarely, 18% responded rarely,  

 29% responded sometimes, 19% responded frequently and 14% responded very fre- 

quently.  

 

 

 21 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix H 

 

 22 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix H 

 

 23 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix H 

 

 24 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix H 

 

 

 

 25 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix I 

 

Provincial and International Homework Policy and Practice Review 

 

Sampling of Provincial Boards 

 

 Ottawa Peel York 

Region 

 TCDSB TDSB 

Homework:   Policy    

                      Procedure      

                      Guideline     

                      Date Last Revised 

 

 

1998 2005 2005 2003 1999 

 Content:       Definition  

                  Quantity Identified in 

minutes                          

                   Scheduling Limitations 

Identified (i.e., coordi- 

nating with other teach- 

ers, days of significance) 

 

                Roles/Responsibilities 

Defined    

                Expectation of Commu- 

nication 

 

 

 

Expectation of the Development of a 

School Based Homework Pol- 

icy/guidelines crafted in partnership 

with school council/parents, staff and 

students        

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Perspective 

 

Many countries around the world are currently engaged in wide scale educational 

reforms.  Some are moving towards rigorous, centralized curriculum with an em- 

phasis on testing and memorization over application.  Others are promoting inquiry 

 26 

Program and School Services Committee  

April 2, 2008  Agenda Item xxx 

 

Appendix I 

 

based constructivism-driven, child-centred progressive curriculum.  Homework 

appears to be front and centre to these reforms and homework policies and prac- 

tices reflect each country’s educational philosophy/position.