Faust - Indiana University








CREATIVE TEAM

Tomer Zvulun              Stage Director
David Effron                Conductor
David Higgins              Set and Costume Designer
Michael Schwandt        Lighting Designer

Photos by Yulya Dukhovny

HOME

REVIEWS

Review: Faust

By George Walker

March 2, 2011


A dramatic, dark, and deeply thoughtful production.

 

The IU Opera Theater’s production of Gounod’s Faust offers a dramatic, dark and thoughtful production, in the capable hands of stage director Tomer Zvulun and designer C. David Higgins

The first act opens with the doctor in the present day. The contemporary set is complete with a wide-screen TV that Mephistopheles uses to conjure up images of Marguerite. Following temptation, it travels back in time to Faust’s youth in 1930s Germany. The flashy, decadent set and costumes evoke Cabaret or The Blue Angel.

The gaudy, garish set and lighting are more than matched by a large cast of beautifully dressed and coiffed choristers, each of whom seems to have a particular place and part in the festivities. This is only the first of many set arrangements; the evening is a rich one, with all the elements of theatre working together.

Conducting for this energetic and engaging production is by David Effron.


Sets, lighting and dramatics create effective production

By Peter Jacobi

Herald Times Reviewer February 28, 2011

 

Production values are high. What one saw on Friday and Saturday evenings at the Musical Arts Center in the IU Opera Theater’s new staging of Gounod’s “Faust” was striking.

C. David Higgins’ sets consist of elements that smoothly, sometimes magically, shift from scene to scene, sliding in from the wings and back, dropping from hidden heights and rising again, appearing and disappearing, changing so as not to disturb the flow of the performance.

The concept for this production is a shared one, with visiting stage director Tomer Zvulun who has given the multitude of performers — the major characters, the minor, the important chorus — personality and dramatic purpose. As theater, this “Faust” works. Sets, lighting and dramatics coalesce into an effective production.

Comments