NEW & RECENT

Undertow
Into the Undertow

by Kris Bigalk
| POETRY, REVIEWS

In Andrea Witzke-Slot's collection, oceanic and water images a recurring themes that carry the reader toward introspection and gratitude.




MAGAZINE



by The Editors 
ISSUE 15

The most recent issue of our magazine features writing and artwork by Marcus Speh, Gary Percesepe, Alex Austin, CL Bledsoe, Kathleen Kirk, Fabio Sassi, and more.  




FICTION



by Michelle McEwen 
FICTION, ISSUE 14

Willie Underwood ain’t like most men. He has this knack for knowing just when to split. He knew Merie would kill him if he hung around long enough and the night that he told me he was gon’ leave her, he left her and came to stay with me. When we was leaving, he say Merie said from behind the screen door, “I shoulda poisoned your ass.” 


FICTION



by Mindy Meija 
FICTION, ISSUE 14

She imagines the white blood cells flooding the area of the cut, frantically mending what she has accidentally torn apart.  Do they look like normal blood cells?  They could be poisoned or diseased—strange, misshapen versions of what cells should be.  Maybe instead of healing the laceration they are tearing it further apart, breaking her open from the core of her body.




MAGAZINE



by The Editors
| ISSUE 14

The most recent issue of our magazine features fiction and poetry by Mindy Mejia, James Robison, Andrea Witzke Slot, Michael Dickel, Michelle McEwen, Tim Suermondt and others. 

 

FICTION



by Barry Jay Kaplan
| FICTION, ISSUE 13

The room: plastered walls, a narrow single bed, a washstand, a battered red armchair. There was also a wobbly shelf that held my razor and a few English language paperbacks published in the forties I’d found in a used bookstore in the Brindisi marketplace. The curtained-off bathroom was equipped with a trough whose trickle of water was the color of blood. In any case, I had come to be by myself and so my situation suited my desire.

COLUMNS

Twitter Office
by Merlin Flower | ESSAYS, COLUMNS

On Twitter, I was following celebrities I had no clue about. The tweets were almost like deciphering hieroglyphics symbols. That and the never ending stream of quotes. My allegiance is still with Facebook, as it has a more personal flavour. But can I live without Twitter?



FEATURES

Asians in the Library
by Allen Gee | FEATURES, ESSAYS, ISSUE 13

What other building or space on a college campus is more necessary to scholarly upward mobility, to achieving the American dream? And yet, Alexandra Wallace couldn't refrain from speaking with her sense of entitlement to target Asians.





INTERVIEW

Fabio Sassi
Leah Hager Cohen: Empathy and Knowingness
by MaryAnne Kolton | INTERVIEWS, BOOKS

"Being present in the world is often a difficult task, but writing, for me, is not a way of sidestepping discomfort. 
It's another mode of being present. The kind of writing that interests me most involves committing to the exploration 
of a full range of thoughts and feelings." MaryAnne Kolton explores writing about grief with Leah Hager Cohen. 



INTERVIEW


by MaryAnne Kolton| INTERVIEWS, FLASH FICTION

Interview Editor MaryAnne Kolton talks shop with writer Meg Pokrass (Damn Sure Right) in the first of our new interview series featuring master writers on their craft.
COLUMNS


by Kulpreet Yadav ESSAYS

Bookstores have accumulated energies of several hundred thousand people, and you as a customer can't have enough of it. Each book is like a fresh new life; each life  or lives  trapped in it is a refreshing revelation. 





NEW & RECENT

Behind You 30

by Erin L. Harwood
| SHORT FICTION, REVIEWS

In The Fullness of Everything, Newgent brazenly writes about grief, death and that terrifying beginning of life with humor and elegance.




FICTION

Behind You 30

by Sonja Larsen
| FICTION, ISSUE 15

The lovers sit nearly naked on the bed in the hot summer night, drinking wine and telling stories. They are new and still telling stories, still taking inventory of each other. The closest that he probably came to really dying, he tells her, was the night he was riding home from a party



REVIEWS

Behind You 30

by David Ackley 
POETRY, REVIEWS


Bill Yarrow's poetry collection, Pointed Sentences, grounds abstractions in a slide show of images and indelible musicality.  



REVIEWS



by Cameron Cook
| FEATURES, FILM, REVIEWS

Think you know the horror genre? Ji-Woo Kim's demented and strange revenge film re-imagines the possibilities of a tired genre.




COLUMNS



by Michael Meyerhofer 
ESSAYS, COLUMNS

The main problem is that open mics are a lightning rod for people who care far less about writing than they do about looking sexy in their brand new flannels and piercings. And whenever it becomes more about presentation than substance, the work suffers.

ESSAYS



by Anne Germanacos
| ESSAYS, CNF, ISSUE 13

Last year, following his death, in one twenty-four-hour period, I took lessons in three different languages. I wanted to see if I could do it. Maybe it’s a question of how much silence you’re able to take inside and hold, almost like a breath. How much silence can you stand before you’re choking on it? At the same time, how much silence do you need and what will you do to procure it? 


MAGAZINE



by The Editors
| ISSUE 13

Read the most recent issue of our magazine that includes work by James Lloyd Davis, Ann Bogle, Emily Severance, George Moore, Anne Germanacos, and others. 

 

INTERVIEW

John Oliver Simon: Dos Vidas
by JP Reese | INTERVIEWS, POETRY, ISSUE 13
 
Translation is my deepest encounter with the other. When I translate I burrow inside another poet’s skin and find my own face staring out. When I’m translated, someone takes on my tongue and teeth and emerges with a language that is tangent to mine at every point on a multi-dimensional surface.



REVIEWS

by John ColemanBOOKS, FICTION

The grotesque and horrific co-exist with the quotidian in Alexander MacLeod's collection of Giller Prize nominated stories set throughout Canada and Detroit. 



COLUMNS

by Simon WardESSAYS

Famous as the wasteland Jane Eyre traverses in sorrow and as the location of Henry Baskerville's murder, our new columnist explores the myth and history of the moor as a luminescent landscape with an ever-changing face. 




FICTION
by Nels HansonSHORT FICTION, ISSUE 12

Should my body survive intact and an autopsy be performed, you will learn that Telatroins are anatomically almost identical to human beings, except for a single glaring difference.