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Lesson Plan 2

University of the Pacific

Gladys Benerd School of Education

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Unit Lesson Plan Template – Short Version

 

 

Essential Question/Central Focus

Apply knowledge of the moon phases to previously drawn moon journal as a formative assessment to prove understanding of the different phases of the moon.

 

Lesson Alignment:

This lesson is the second in the unit and is after the introduction lesson on the moon phases.  This will be a follow-up lesson to the other moon lesson because the students will take what they have learned about the different moon phases and relate it to the drawings of the moon they saw in the sky.  They will use their knowledge from the day before and relate it to a real life situation.  This lesson will be the end of the moon lessons but reestablish the idea that the sun is illuminating the moon and this will lead into the next lessons that focus on the sun.

 

CA Content Standard(s): 

·      Third Grade/ Earth Science

4.b. Students know the way in which the Moon’s appearance changes during the four- week lunar cycle.

 

·      Third Grade/Mathematical Reasoning

2.1 Use estimation to verify the reasonableness of calculated results.

3.1 Evaluate the reasonableness of the solution in the context of the original situation.

 

Objectives:

·      Content Objective(s): 

o   SWBAT identify the phase of the moon (already done by drawing the moon in journal) and add the most appropriate label for the phase they saw.

o   SWBAT calculate approximately how long each phase will last throughout the four week lunar cycle

 

·      Academic Language Objective: 

Students will be taking work they have done (journals) and continuing their research of the moon.  This goes beyond just what it looks like but for how long will it look this way.  They will also speak to the class about their journals explaining what phase they labeled (e.g. new moon) and why they chose that phase.

 

·      Key Vocabulary/Concepts:

 

o   Phases: the changing area of illumination of the moon

o   New moon: the moon in total darkness

o   Full moon: the moon fully illuminated

o   First quarter: the moon appears half illuminated (distinguished from the third quarter by how many days have passed since the new moon, usually around 7 days after the new moon will be the first quarter)

o   Third quarter: the moon appears half illuminated (distinguished from the first quarter by how many days have passed since the new moon, usually around 22 days after the new moon will be the third quarter)

o   Crescent: the slimmer shape of the moon throughout the cycle (compliments the gibbous)

o   Gibbous: the larger shape of the moon when not yet a quarter or full moon (compliments the crescent)

o   Waxing (Crescent/Gibbous): the first half of the moon’s phase cycle (from new moon to full moon)

o   Waning (Crescent/Gibbous): the second half of the moon’s phase cycle (from full moon to new moon)

 

Materials:

1.     Moon Journal

2.     Word bank for vocabulary/or word wall (see vocabulary from above)

3.     Displayed pictures of moon phases to reference if needed (real life photos of each moon phase would be beneficial for this activity so the students can compare the picture to what they remember seeing in the sky)

4.     Access to YouTube for The Moon Song (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkvlrWpsnuQ)

5.     The Moon Song Lyrics to display for students to learn and sing along with (PDF of lyrics in resources) and see below:

The Moon Song

Mr. Parr

(Music by Cee Lo Green)

 

I see it hanging all around

In the sky above and I’m like

The Moon

Oo,Oo, Oo

I guess the change in the phases

Brighten it up, I’m like

The Moon

It’s a New Moon too

Is that Solar Eclipse, yeah, the Moon blocks the Sun a bit

Ha, ain’t the Sun a slit (Sun’s not so lit)

And although there’s Waxing and Waning

I still like it best with a

New Moon

Oo,Oo, Oo

 

Yeah we’re charting with New it’s starting

But the next phase is Waxing Crescent

We’re moving counterclockwise the First Quarter

But that’s only a quarter way there

It’s Waxing Gibbous, that looks like a Full Moon

(Oh wait there’s a part missing, left side is dark, thinning)

Ooooh

I got a Full Moon for you

Yeah, go run and tell your little friends

 

I see it hanging all around

In the sky above and I’m like

The Moon

Oo,Oo, Oo

I guess the change in the phases

Brightens it up, I’m like

The Moon

It’s a Full Moon too

Is that a Lunar Eclipse, yeah, Earth’s shadow casts on it

Now the Moon ain’t lit (Moon’s dark a bit)

And although there’s Waxing and Waning

I still like it best with a Full Moon

 

Now the Full Moon changes tomorrow

Begins Waning Gibbous so neat

Trying to keep lit in its orbit

Cause Third Quarter left half gets heat

The Waning Crescnet looks like a “c” askew

(Oh wait there’s a part missing, just thought the right side was hiding)

Ooooh

I’ve got a New Moon for you

Yeah, go run and tell your little friends

 

Lesson Sequence:

·      INTO: 

o   Hook:  Ask the students if anyone has heard the radio version or clean version of the song by Cee Lo Green “Forget You”.

o   Can anyone sing a line of it for those who have not heard it or recall what song I am talking about”

o   Introduce The Moon Song! Have the students listen first.

o   While the song is playing be near the word wall and use a pointer to point to each word as they come up in the song.

o   Sing a couple of times and have the kids identify what words they know in the lyrics (e.g. new moon)

 

·      THROUGH

o   Formative Assessment:  The students will have the drawings they did of the phases to label as well as calculating the length of the phases and this will be done individually in their journals so that they can be evaluated for understanding once they turn them in.  If they have labeled the phases correctly and calculated the length correctly this will show understanding of the concepts. 

 

o   Learning Tasks:

1.     Hand out previously drawn journals (two weeks of moon drawings, one per night)

2.     Have the reference pictures of each moon phase displayed in the room

3.     Students should look over their drawings and for each one they should label what phase the moon was in. 

4.     In addition to what phase it is they should figure out how long this phase will last.  This will require them to understand that each main phase can be viewed about a week apart from each other  (4 week cycle and 4 main phases-new moon, first quarter, full moon and third quarter) however there are a few other phases that occur in between the main phases (Waxing Gibbous, Waning Gibbous, Waxing Crescent, Waning Crescent).

5.     Before letting them work on their own as a class address how many phases are in the complete lunar cycle.  Say, “There are 4 main or exact phases, and 4 interval or changing phases.  How many phases do we have all together?” Students should answer 8.  Once they know this let them try and figure out how they will go about determining the length of each phase. (If they do not know exactly where to go from here give them a hint that they should use division) Below are examples:

 

 

Terminology and Data for calculations:

28 day lunar cycle

(for calculating purposes we will use this number of days in the lunar cycle but explain that the lunar cycle can last anywhere from 28-29.5 days)

4 main phases or exact points of the lunar cycle (new moon, first quarter, full moon, third quarter)

4 intervals or changing phases of the lunar cycle (waxing crescent, waxing gibbous, waning gibbous, waning crescent)

 

Correct Calculations will show:

Solution #1

28 days total in cycle divided by 4 main/exact phases equals 7 days. 

Then the student will calculate each of these phases divided by 2 accounting for the interval/changing phases.

7 days divided by 2 equals 3 ½ days

 

(28 divided by 4 then by 2)

28 days divided by 4 phases = 7days per phase

7days divided by 2 phases = 3.5 days per phase

 

Solution #2

28 days total in cycle divided by the 8 total phases (main/exact plus interval/changing phases)

28 days divided by 8 phases = 3.5 days per phase

 

6.     In their journals the students should show all of their work for calculating the length of each phase.  They do not need to do this for each phase because each phase will be about the same length so one page at the back of the journal will suffice.  If the do not seem to understand that the length of each phase should add up to the entire lunar cycle of 28 days then have them put the length of each phase under the label they added for each page.

 

7.     BEYOND

Learning Tasks:  (Reflecting on their 14-day journals) Ask the students “about how many phases did you see while you were keeping your journals?  They should record this at the end of their journals in a sentence.  They will have completed this thoroughly if they state that they would see about 4 phases and explain this is because there are 3.5 days approximately for each phase and since their journal is 14 days long this allows for the passing of 4 phases.  This has them use the work they have done and apply this to the mathematical standards: 2.1 Use estimation to verify the reasonableness of calculated results and 3.1 Evaluate the reasonableness of the solution in the context of the original situation.

 

Back-up: 

Too Easy: If the tasks are too easy for the students they can follow up with responding to the beyond scenario and writing a paragraph for it, describing each phase they saw and for how long they saw it.  This would be done more as a journal entry.  (It can start with Dear Journal, Tonight I saw…) This can also include descriptions of the shapes (e.g. slit, getting bigger or other descriptions used in The Moon Song).

Too Challenging: If the learning tasks are too difficult this can be adjusted by giving each child their own copy of the moon phases handout (RAFT) so that they have their own reference guide.  This can help them determine which phase is closest to the shape they drew in their journal.

 

 

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Amanda Bailey,
Apr 5, 2012, 3:55 PM
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Amanda Bailey,
Apr 5, 2012, 3:58 PM
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