Energy Supply and Demand

Supply
Electricity is supplied to the power grid from the following sources:
  1. Coal
  2. Nuclear Power
  3. Natural Gas
  4. Oil
  5. Hydro
  6. Biomass
  7. Wind
  8. Geothermal
  9. Solar 
Coal, Nuclear Power, Natural Gas, Oil and Hydro Power (#1-5) are the greatest contributors of power supply in the United States.  As one might expect, the use of each of these resources varies throughout the regions based on resource availability and relative abundance.  The other sources of electricity (#6-10) are relatively new to the market supply.  While these sources of power are sustainable, significant investment in technology and infrastructure to support their entrance into the energy supply market is required. 


Demand

Approximately 125 million households use electricity from the power grid. The demand for electricity by each household has increased significantly since the power grids were built.  Household items that have been introduced and more widely utilized include: air conditioning and heating, water heating, refrigerators, dishwashers, TVs, washers, dryers, computers, etc.  The below tables show the top ten states for the number of consumers, average monthly consumption, average retail price and average monthly bill.  While the author of this site is not yet qualified to make adequate correlation comparisons, there seems to be a correlation between the state climate, geographic location, and power supply resource. 

TOP TEN STATES for AVG MONTHLY CONSUMPTION OF ELECTRICITY



TOP TEN STATES for AVG RETAIL PRICE OF ELECTRICITY (cents/kWh)


TOP TEN STATES for AVG MONTHLY BILL (dollars and cents)


This number does not include businesses and industries that require electricity. According to the US Energy Information Administration, energy consumption within manufacturing has slightly decreased since 1998, but remains relatively stable.  However, despite improvements, the industrial sector accounts for a large portion of consumption.  The four sectors identified are industrial, commercial, residential and transportation. 

As the figure above shows, energy consumption for each of the sectors is projected to increase over the next 25 years.  These projections indicate that further strain will be placed on existing natural resources (coal, oil, gas) to supply energy and electricity to the four main sectors.  Despite the American need for an "all-you-can-eat energy buffet" at a low price, the existing means by which energy is distributed, generated, supplied and carried (our power grid) is unable to meet future demands. 




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