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Double R MkII

Under construction

Specification

  • Length -  mm
  • Body Diameter -  mm
  • Number of fins -
  • Fin Span -  mm
  • Net Weight -  g
  • Maximum Payload  -  g
 Engine
 Payload,
g
 Approx. Apogee,
m
 Approx. Max. Velocity,
m/s
 Approx. Max. Acceleration,
m/s/s











Design Description

Complete  OpenRocket design file is attached at the bottom of this page. 


The rocket was designed ....  

 

 
 




 

Launch Log

 Date Motor Ejection Altitude
 WindNotes/ Event
    16/05/2011
 
After several months of waiting for better weather, larger field etc I tested the rocket last weekend. To be correct it was flown a couple of times before, but without the first stage. After these test flights the payload section with LED flashlight (see post#6) was replaced with a different design. It is a small RF tracker that fits into BT-20 (18mm) tube. It is 105mm in length and weights 16g. I will post details in the Electronics section.

For the two-stage test C6-0 + B6-4 motors were selected. Staging worked perfectly and the rocket disappeared in the sky. I could not see the chute deployment and due to strong wing I could not hear it either. However, the transmitter’s signal was strong and I managed to track its bearing for the whole time it was descending. As soon as the transmitter was on the ground the signal was lost. Unfortunately the shock cord got torn leaving only the payload section attached to the parachute. It was too light for rapid descent and it got carried down the range. It took me over an hour of waiving my Yagi around but eventually I managed to pick up some noise and then a strong signal coming from about the right direction. The payload was discovered just over 1400 meters from the launch site.
All and all, despite lost booster section, I consider it to be a very successful launch. Rack rocket staging worked perfectly; considerable altitude was achieved; visual contact with the rocket was lost; the descending rocket was tracked and recovered using instrumental observation. The only unfortunate aspect is that I forgot to take a god picture of the rocket before the launch.


     
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