"Fat: An Appreciation of a Misunderstood Ingredient, with Recipes"

This is a great book for learning about using what some would call the “leftover” fat from meat. It is easy to read with 4 main chapters: Butter, Pork Fat, Poultry Fat and Beef and Lamb fats with dozens of recipes in each area. From breakfast to dinner and beyond, this book is marvelous.

Review by Ceara

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"The Culinary Recipes of Medieval England"

This is the last book written by Ms. Hieat and was published posthumously in 2013, she passed away in 2011. This book is organized by category of the dish from all of the medieval manuscripts. It is similar to the "Concordance", however she's taken the most basic or popular version of the dish and published it here.

Review by Ceara

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 "Cooking and Dining in Medieval England" by Peter Brears

A delightful book that explains everything about a medieval kitchen. From the different departments such as the pastry and the boiling house, to what utensils they used to the layout of the kitchen with floor plans of several castles included. How to set the tables and how to serve a dish. The recipes range from ale to cheese to pottage to worts. This book is well worth every penny.

Review by Ceara

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 "The Original Mediterranean Cruisine: Medieval recipes for today" By Barbara Santich

A delightful book, broken down into easily digestible sections. The first part has a quick history lesson on ingredients around the Mediterranean, then sections on sauces, meats, fish, vegetables, pies, desserts, and preserves. She pulls these recipes from a variety of books, keeping the original transcript, the direct translation, and a modern recipe. I highly recommend the stuffed aubergines. This was my first medieval cook book (thank you Giuseppe) with a little bit of everything.

Review by Coineanach

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 "The Book Of Sent Sovi. Medieval recipes from Catalonia" translated by Robin Vogelzang

My newest Christmas present, I've only had a chance to randomly open the book, and found a recipe to make Camel Sauce... Intrigued? Me too, more info to follow...

Review by Coineanach

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 "Porters English Cookery Bible Ancient and Modern" by Richard, Earl of Bradford & Carol Wilson

This is wonderful cookbook of recent English cooking, say the last 300 years. The contents are broken down from food groups to a holiday section near the end.  I've made many of the recipes and have found them all flavorful and filling.   Who said English food was plain?

Review by Ceara

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 "Porters Seasonal Celebrations Cookbook by Richard" Earl of Bradford and Carol Wilson 

This is another fabulous cookery book from England.  They are broken down into seasons then the holiday.  Which also lets us, the cook, know what is or isn't in season. And not only are the recipes good, but the history is fascinating. Why does Scotland have a bigger celebration at Hogmanay (New Years) than Christmas?  see page 231

Review by Ceara

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 "Anthimus" by Mark Grant

Not so much a cookbook, but a window into available ingredients, this book is a treatise on herbs and foods of 6th century Germany (the Merovingian period). It lists about 2 or 3 recipes, but for the most part addresses the physical properties of plants and meats. It isn't a lot, but it is the best we seem to have in terms of looking at this period of history.

Review by Giuseppe

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 "The Opera of Bartolomeo Scappi" by Terence Scully

Very simply, this is a bible for historical cooks.  Scappi, the personal chef to the pope in 1570, composed this treasure, complete with several woodcut plates of kitchen items and the actual kitchens of the time.  It also contains recipes and a fantastic glimpse into the world of 1570 Italy.

Review by Giuseppe

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 "Epulario e segreti vari" by Giovanni Del Turco

Somewhat of a curiosity  this book exists in both its original Itian form, as well as the English translation made available in London in 1598. Containing an assortment of recipes  it teaches us the foods of Italy, and also conveys a sense of "imported excitement" in its translation.

Review by Giuseppe

 


 "Cooking Apicius: Roman Recipes for Today" by Sally Grainger

A must have for students of cooking history, Apicius is arguably the oldest cookbook in history, dating to the turbulant rule of Emperor Tiberius.  Rich in description and bold in flavor, the recipes from Apicius are as delightful now as one would expect for the rich and ancient culture that is Rome.

Review by Giuseppe

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The Origins of Fruit and Vegetables By Jonathan Roberts

Ever wonder, “Hmmm… did they use such-n-such fruit or vegetable in the 14th century?” Sure you have! (At least if you’re a cooking geek like the rest of us in the Upper Crust). This is a great reference to keep handy whenever this question comes up. While not definitive in its information, this book does cover a brief overview of basic documentation for documentable origins of many types of fruits and vegetables. It is less about recipes and specifics, but does pose some interesting theories and quick answers in an easy to reference format.

Review by Giuseppe

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 Invito alla mensa del mercante del Trecento/ An Invitation to the Table of a Merchant of the Trecento: Usi, arnesi e ricette della cucina medievale / Customs, ... Kitchen (English and Italian Edition)

Just as an “amuse bouche” tantalizes the palate leaving the diner wanting more, this little gem gives the reader just a teensy glimpse into the rich culture of cooking and kitchen set-ups within medieval Italy. Written in Italian (with English translation on the side), this booklet reviews a handful of illuminated plate details to reveal domestic scenes of cooking and eating. Additionally, it also discusses a couple of period recipes, including photos of the original handwritten folios. 

I love where this booklet is going, but I wish there were more. Sadly, it only covers a couple of recipes leaving the culinary researcher wanting much, much more.

Review by Giuseppe

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 "The Opera of Bartolomeo Scappi" by Terence Scully

Very simply, this is a bible for historical cooks.  Scappi, the personal chef to the pope in 1570, composed this treasure, complete with several woodcut plates of kitchen items and the actual kitchens of the time.  It also contains recipes and a fantastic glimpse into the world of 1570 Italy.

Review by Giuseppe

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