The Readers' Voice 2010


A Convention for Readers and Reading Groups

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Additional Event at Blackwell
War Writing
10 March

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The Readers' Voice 2010
On line Discussion

Wuthering Heights
by Emily Brontë

following the Convention
A free downloadable e-Book is available here 


Articles from

The
Readers' Voice
Convention 2009

can be found here.



follow
The Readers' Voice


Authors read by
Books on the Broad
Reading Group: 

Chinua Achebe
Kingsley Amis
Martin Amis
Paul Auster
Pat Barker
Julian Barnes
Saul Bellow
Peter Carey
Lewis Carroll
Angela Carter
Joseph Conrad
Anita Desai
Kiran Desai
Charles Dickens
JP Donleavy
Ralph Ellison
F Scott Fitzgerald
E M Forster
Elizabeth Grant
Graham Greene
Kate Grenville
Mohsin Hamid
Ernest Hemingway
Alan Hollinghurst
Khaled Hosseini
Kazuo Ishiguro
Franz Kafka
Yasmina Khadra
Barbara Kingsolver
Matthew Kneale
Hanif Kureishi
DH Lawrence
Harper Lee
Stanislaw Lem
Doris Lessing
Marina Lewycka
Amin Malouf
Hilary Mantel
Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Carson McCullers
Ian McEwan
John McGahern
Andrew Miller
David Mitchell
Vladimir Nabokov
Irène Némirovsky
Jeff Noon
Ben Okri
Orhan Pamuk
Iain Pears
Annie Proulx
Philip Pullman
Ian Rankin
Philip Reeve
Philip Roth
Salman Rushdie
Jean-Paul Sartre
Gillian Slovo
Wesley Stace
John Steinbeck
Kurt Vonnegut
Paul Waters
Evelyn Waugh
Jeanette Winterson
Virginia Wolf
Richard Yates
Marguerite Yourcenar

For details go to the group's website 
booksonthebroad.
googlepages.com
 where our newsletters can be downloaded




The Readers' Voice 2010 
On line Discussion

Wuthering Heights 
by Emily Brontë

following the Convention 
A free downloadable e-Book is available here 


Articles from

The 
Readers' Voice 
Convention 2009

can be found here.



Authors read by
Books on the Broad
Reading Group: 

Chinua Achebe
Kingsley Amis
Martin Amis
Paul Auster
Pat Barker
Julian Barnes
Saul Bellow
Peter Carey
Lewis Carroll
Angela Carter
Joseph Conrad
Anita Desai
Kiran Desai
Charles Dickens
JP Donleavy
Ralph Ellison
F Scott Fitzgerald
E M Forster
Elizabeth Grant
Graham Greene
Kate Grenville
Mohsin Hamid
Ernest Hemingway
Alan Hollinghurst
Khaled Hosseini
Kazuo Ishiguro
Franz Kafka
Yasmina Khadra
Barbara Kingsolver
Matthew Kneale
Hanif Kureishi
DH Lawrence
Harper Lee
Stanislaw Lem
Doris Lessing
Marina Lewycka
Amin Malouf
Hilary Mantel
Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Carson McCullers
Ian McEwan
John McGahern
Andrew Miller
David Mitchell
Vladimir Nabokov
Irène Némirovsky
Jeff Noon
Ben Okri
Orhan Pamuk
Iain Pears
Annie Proulx
Philip Pullman
Ian Rankin
Philip Reeve
Philip Roth
Salman Rushdie
Jean-Paul Sartre
Gillian Slovo
Wesley Stace
John Steinbeck
Kurt Vonnegut
Paul Waters
Evelyn Waugh
Jeanette Winterson
Virginia Wolf
Richard Yates
Marguerite Yourcenar

For details go to the group's website 
booksonthebroad.
googlepages.com
 where our newsletters can be downloaded

The Readers' Voice 2010 
On line Discussion

Wuthering Heights 
by Emily Brontë

following the Convention 
A free downloadable e-Book is available here 




Speakers
(in order of talks)

Margaret Willes - author of Reading Matters - Five Centuries of Discovering Books, which examines how people acquired and read books from the sixteenth century to the present day. She has worked as an editor in three London publishing houses. She is now the Publisher at the National Trust and began the Trust's own book imprint.

David Pearson - Director of Libraries, Archives and Guildhall Art Gallery at the City of London. He has previously worked in other major academic and research libraries, including the British Library and the National Art Library at the V&A.  He has written extensively on aspects of the ownership and binding history of books, and his latest title, Books as History, was published by the British Library in 2008.

Chris Meade– charismatic Director of if:book, a small think and do tank based in London which explores the potential of new media for creative readers and writers & investigates how the nature of writingand reading is changing as it moves from printed page to networked screen.

Kim Pickin is Co-director of The Story Museum, a new museum in the heart of Oxford celebrating children's literature and story telling. 'A wonderful gift to the whole world from Oxford, where so many stories have begun'. 

After five years in publishing and twenty in business consultancy Kim’s interest in books, children and Oxford became a project that has taken over her life. Kim has a psychology degree, an MBA and three sons who gave her a great excuse to rediscover children’s literature.

Moris Farhi was born in 1935 in Ankara, Turkey. He is the author of several novels and has been vice-president of International PEN since 2001 and was appointed an MBE in 2001. He has written several novels, including Children of the Rainbow and Journey through the Wilderness.

Young Turk, his latest novel prior to A Designated Man, was very highly acclaimed. In it, Farhi weaves together 13 short tales to tell a powerful story of Turkey just before, during, and after World War II. It has been called  a wise, craftily spun and spine-tinglingly erotic tale of love, courage and the forging of conscience, Reminiscent of Julio Cortazar and Italo Calvino.

Ben Crystal - actor and writer. He has worked in TV, film and theatre, has recorded audiobooks for the RNIB Talking Books, and worked as a narrator for Channel 4 and the BBC. He regularly gives poetry readings at literature festivals around the country, and is a Liar with the Liar's League. He has written three books on Shakespeare; his most recent 'Shakespeare on Toast' (Icon, 2008), is a fascinating and refreshing take on the Bard.




Discussion Leaders


Juliet Barker"If anyone had asked me what was my ambition when I was a teenager I would have said that it was to write a biography of the Brontës. I had been immersed in the Brontës since childhood, and, living near Haworth, loved the landscapes that had inspired them as much as their novels. I always thought it would be impossible to realise my dream: so many books had already been written – how could there be room for one more?"

Sarah Turveyteaches English at Roehampton University. She is also a Fellow of Crucible, the University's centre for teaching and research into human rights and social justice. She has been organising and running prison reading groups since 2000.  Her teaching interests include nineteenth-century American literature, twentieth-century literature of the American South, and the short story.

Kieran O’Halloran is a Senior Lecturer in Linguistics in the Centre for Language and Communication at the Open University, UK.  He was co-investigator on an Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded project The Discourse of Reading Groups (2008). 

Publications include Critical Discourse Analysis and Language Cognition (Edinburgh University Press, 2003), Applying English Grammar: Functional and Corpus Approaches (Hodder Arnold, 2004 with Coffin and Hewings), The Art of English: Literary Creativity (Palgrave Macmillan, 2006 with Goodman) and Applied Linguistics Methods: A Reader (Routledge, 2009 with Coffin and Lillis).

Ben Crystal - actor and writer. (see above)

Lucy Cross has worked in public libraries for over 25 years, and is currently Acting Director of Libraries, Luton Libraries, which is part of Luton Cultural Services Trust. She has had a number of roles, including being a Children's Librarian, Service Development Manager for Information and Learning, and latterly as Principal Librarian, managing information, learning and e-delivery for Luton Libraries. She has always been interested in developments in technology to widen access to information and the written word.

Fiona Marriott has worked for Luton Libraries since 1987 in a number of different roles. Currently she is Principal Librarian for Adult Services and Reader Development, which involves promoting the enjoyment of reading, as well as focussing on literacy and learning. Fiona is responsible for the new e-book and downloadable audiobook library, which was launched last year, and is interested in any media that can encourage people to read (and write) more.

Kate Clanchy taught for ten years in state schools before becoming a freelance writer. She has published three collections of poetry, an anthology, a children's book and, most recently, Antigona and Me, a work of non-fiction. She has won numerous awards including the 2009 BBC National Short Story Award, Saltire and Forward prizes, and has also written extensively for radio. Kate still loves to teach, and now has three children of her own.

Mónica Parle is the Programme Manager for First Story, a charity that seeks to foster creativity, literacy and talent in young British students by arranging for acclaimed writers to lead weekly writing workshops in “challenging” secondary schools. In her previous life, she worked in the publishing industry, as a freelance copy editor for Routledge, Senior Editor for Feminist Economics, and Marketing Co-ordinator for Arte Público Press.

Anney Blake - has been a professional librarian since 1969 and has worked in a wide range of libraries, from charities to country house libraries. She is currently a librarian for Oxfordshire’s library service, and has 10 years’ experience of working with reading groups, including one in a men's prison, where her interest in reading groups first started. Since then, she has set up 3 reading groups at Witney Library with a new one coming soon at Bicester Library.  Needless to say, she’s an avid reader and passionate about sharing the joy of books with her three grown-up children and anyone else who’ll listen!

Catherine Stuart -  has been running the Oxford Book Club meetup for two years. The  book club, hosted online, has a large and diverse membership, and members meet regularly in the city centre. Catherine lives in Oxford, and works at Oxford University Press as a senior editor.




Forum Contributors

Angie Prysor- Jones – is a joint founder of the Oxford Literary Festival (1997), Co-Director until 2008 and now Director of Oxford Literary Festival: Education & Outreach. Previously she had various roles in sales and marketing for Heinemann ELT and Thames and Hudson and is now also a freelance publicist and project manager. She has two teenage children who fall into the reading stereotypes of a girl who loves fiction and a boy who will only read non-fiction!

Ans van Hille – studied English at Leiden University and later taught English at secondary level and also to adults. She now owns the Mayflower Bookshop in Leiden, which specializes in selling books written in the English language.

Janet Hall – has been a Mind worker for 22 years. She has a degree in Psychology and Philosophy, and has a life long interest in stories and groups.

Annie Mellor – Annie Mellor is currently running a Mind Community Resource project.  She has a degree in English Literature and a Masters in Language, Literature and Culture, and has a passion for stories, poetry and drama.