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charmed life
poetry by Buck Downs
ISBN 978-1-940120-96-6
Price $10.95










The Stories We Tell
poetry by 
Irene Fick
ISBN 978-1-940120-98-0
Price $9.95










Brackish Water
poetry by 
Michael Blaine
ISBN 978-1-940120-99-7
Price $10.95




















Love, War and Music
poetry by
Franetta McMillian
ISBN 978-1-940120-89-8
Price $9.95




Highway 78
Poetry by
Susanne Bostick Allen
ISBN 978-1-940120-80-5
Price $9.95






























L'Heure bleu
by David R. Slavitt
ISBN # 978-0-9837789-1-2
Price $11.95



The Homestead Poems
by Gary Hanna
ISBN # 978-0-9837789-2-9
Price $10.95



The Black Narrows
Poetry by S. Scott Whitaker
ISBN # 978-0-9837789-3-6
Price $9.95



Ice-Solstice
Poetry by Kelley Jean White
ISBN # 978-0-9837789-4-3
Price $8.95



Sediment and Other Poems
Poetry by Gary Hanna
ISBN # 978-0-9837789-5-0
Price $9.95




Sound Effects
Poetry by Nina Bennett
ISBN # 978-0-9837789-6-7
Price $8.95




Taken Away
Poetry by Carolyn Cecil
ISBN # 978-0-9837789-7-4
Price $8.95




Where Night Comes From
Poetry by Shea Garvin
ISBN # 978-0-9837789-8-1
Price $9.95



                   Named 2013 "Best Book of Verse"                                        by Delaware Press Association
Sakura
A Cycle of Haiku by Jamie Brown
ISBN # 978-0-9837789-9-8
Price $10.95





The Softened Ground
Poetry by Tina Raye Dayton
ISBN # 978-0-9837789-0-5
$9.00
Winner of the 2012 Dogfish Head Poetry Prize




          


Salmagundi
Poetry by Sherry Gage Chapelle
ISBN 978-0-9826030-9-3
$9.00
Winner of the 2011 Dogfish Head Poetry Prize





Constructing Fiction
Essays by Jamie Brown
ISBN 978-0-9826030-8-6
$6.00




Fractured Light
Poetry by Amanda Newell
ISBN 978-0-9826030-7-9
$7.95
Winner of the 2010 Dogfish Head Poetry Prize




Loopholes
Poetry by David P. Kozinski
ISBN 978-0-9826030-0-0
$7.00
Winner of the 2009 Dogfish Head Poetry Prize










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Chapbook Catalog


NEW 
In Summer 2014
The Key Poetry Series Second Sequence 
6 New Chapbook Titles!

charmed life
by 
Buck Downs

I don't know if Buck Downs leads a charmed life—literally—but there's something exceedingly lucky—felicitous—happy—about the way he lays down these poetic telegrams of twenty-first-century experience in Charmed Life. The reader swoops along on Downs's burst of coy and cunning language, "drifting like old- / fashioned / radio signals" through the perennial—but here freshly revivified—territories of love, sex, music, everyday living. These poems will charm your socks—hell, maybe even your pants—off: "don't change / your mind / for me, // not if / you grind / for me." — Mark Scroggins

 $10.95




The Stories We Tell
by
Irene Fick
Irene Fick’s first book has stolen my heart with its clear sweet lines, and lack of artifice. Here’s poetry that doesn’t need to persuade, for its presence in the world emerges from a genuine source with immediate connectivity. The title of the book is straightforward, yet it’s rare to create the right story in the right form with themes laid out in a unified vision. Fick is a writer of observation, but more, of felt life. Once you enter her currents of thought, there’s no going back or stopping. To be able to show hard glimpses of reality with beauty and truth is a gift many poets have not achieved.  As for fear, age, dementia, illness and death, Fick turns them over to the angels of language where they belong—and they could not do better.  I am permanently touched by this book.

               —Grace Cavalieri

        $9.95

 



Brackish Water
by
Michael Blaine

Michael Blaine’s aptly named Brackish Water is a compendium of lyric and ekphrastic poems and haiku that focus primarily on the pleasures and trials of marriage, family and fatherhood. He confronts shadings and mixes of emotion that most human beings experience. Very few, however possess his mastery of language and powers of expression. Water is considered brackish when it is neither entirely salt nor fresh, but both simultaneously, and in varying proportions. Brackish water seems the right medium for Blaine’s poems which reflect life’s incongruities and flux; the forces that pull people, and those they love, apart and together again. So too, these poems are seldom just one thing. Some are very clear in their meaning and directness of language, while others are murkier, leaving more to the reader’s imagination. All of them make compelling reading, and together, they create a whole more profound than the sum of its parts.           -- David P. Kozinski, Author of Loopholes,                                                        Winner of the 2009 Dogfish Head Poetry Prize

I like the voice of the teacher evident in this collection, a teacher aware he is walking with his children (and his readers) to points of growth which are also points of no return, moments when familiar realities feel fundamental and life-sustaining, though they also seem to usher each of us off into our own privacies.                                                                -- David McAleavey,                                                                                             Author of Holding Obsidian and Huge Haiku

In Brackish Water, Michael Blaine navigates the complicated habitats of desire, marriage, fatherhood, and loss. He reminds us that “[r]eal isn’t enough”—that something more must be “added to make/the eye believe.”  Blaine’s poems, in effect, become a kind of tide themselves, carrying the reader from Rehoboth Bay to as far away as the Gulf of Mexico and Haiti.  And yet, the spare imagery of these finely crafted poems—the silky muck, the tractor discs, the rock and shale—keeps us firmly rooted in the earth. Blaine’s remarkable collection affirms our shared consciousness, and in the end, he shows us it is possible to sift among the wreckage, “to pick up and rebuild/what [is] salvageable.”                                                                                                                        -- Amanda Newell, Author of Fractured Light,                                                 Winner of the 2010 Dogfish Head Poetry Prize,

$10.95




Love, War and Music
by
Franetta McMillian
Franetta McMillian writes in a language both clear
and meditative, tackling subject matter as wide ranging as the title of her
work suggests. She evokes the imagery of everything from popular television
shows to vehement bigotry, and each time provokes the readers to challenge
their perceptions on the matter. This poetry is not preaching, nor is it
pushing boundaries for the sake of it—McMillian engages in a deep exploration
of her various subjects with each line, and that sort of depth can't do
anything but force the audience to think in a new way.  
                

                    — Joshua D. Isard, Director

                            MFA Program in Creative Writing 

                                         Arcadia University

 

Franetta McMillian's poems are deliciously awash in the (often overlooked) inherent musicality found in the word, and in an infectious, riveting, and unabashedly singular vision. You cannot help but follow these rhythmic narrative journeys. You want to know where the poems are going- what you will see, hear, and feel on the way.  You'll also want to revisit each poem's questions and/or implications. I often found myself thinking of a line from another poet—Rainer Maria Rilke-- "Love the questions like locked doors." Ms. McMillian's work is a reminder that there are still infinite linguistic songs to be sung—what Patti Smith dubbed "a sea of possibilities."  Let this fine volume into your heart.

                      — Reuben Jackson, Author of Fingering the Keys, and

Host, Friday Night Jazz Vermont Public Radio

$9.95



Highway 78
by
Susanne Bostick Allen

From the rich bottom land of Alabama to the slick highways circumventing Washington D.C. ,  Suzanne Bostick Allen takes us on a sojourn of unsentimental power with her skillfully balanced poetry. The subtext is a woman's identity, probing into corners with intelligent humor. Allen's calm observations become poetry as the rhythm of language governs narrative, and  we then enter an extended map of a poet's fine senses.
                 --Grace Cavalieri, Host
                       "The Poet and the Poem from                                                       the Library of Congress."

Long-time government writer Susanne Bostick Allen advises that “[r]ed is vital to our mission” and “[b]eige has practical applications”, but “the sentences are up to no good”.  She chastens bureaucracy with understated humor, then escapes to clear-eyed remembrance of childhood visits to relatives in rural Alabama.  Highway 78 cogently contrasts both ways of life to reveal a life well examined and honestly reported.                                                            -- Howard Gofreed,                                                                          author of Postcard from Bologna

 $9.95



BLOX: Text Quanta
by 
James Michael Robbins
$10.95


(forthcoming)





Our Other Titles

L'Heure bleu
by David R. Slavitt

A Meditation on Clarice Lispector, the Brazilian Novelist 

(or maybe a novel)

     “David R Slavitt’s post-modern romp through Clarice Lispector’s world of Rio and her last novel, A Hora da estrela, will leave readers smiling at Slavitt’s breadth and wit. He posits that it is Lispector we are reading about, and her sophisticated world of Rio, but Slavitt, like the great Oz, remains behind the curtain pulling the strings, booming through the microphone, reminding us that, in literature not all is what it seems.”  — Scott Whitaker (NBCC)

 





The Homestead Poems

Poetry by Gary Hanna

On the Occasion of the 75th  Anniversary of the Founding of     the Rehoboth Art League

“Tell me a tale / of days that have been, / but look to the stars / to get past the hours,” Gary Hannah writes in “Skating on Water.” These poems look through the lens of history—both personal and collective—by means of the immediate details of the present. The love for the exact charms me: the objects, seasons, beaches, towers, screen doors, birds, crabs, and flowers. It is the unseen, though, that finally holds me, the backdrop of the lonely human mind, the individual longing, both for the past and for what we wish and hope to understand and be in the present. These poems are lovers of life. They are a pleasure to read.     –Fleda Brown





The Black Narrows

Poetry by

S. Scott Whitaker

Chapbook Number One in The Key Poetry Series

With scraps of history and a thread of fiction, Scott Whitaker has stiched together a patchwork-quilt world. These are living poems that celebrate a long-dead place, drenched with images. These lines are muscular, masculine, and smell of the rich air on the cusp of land and water; they taste of clams and raw oysters.   

--H.A. Maxson








Ice-Solstice

Poetry by 

Kelley Jean White

Chapbook Number Two in The Key Poetry Series

Kelley Jean White’s poetry crackles with electricity. There is science here, math, the bones of the dead, Bach, and the music of despair which is a radio filling a boxcar. White’s poems are tense, strong, full of big, jaunty, precise language that evoke the range of human loss, spiritual, emotional, sexual. Whether she writes about the loss of childhood memories or our mundane world of gasoline prices and nap-weary adults, White brings energy, immediacy and power.

    — S. Scott Whitaker

         (National Book Critics Circle)

 




Sediment 

and Other Poems

Poetry by Gary Hanna

Chapbook Number Three in The Key Poetry Series 

Gary Hannah weaves his crisp ideas in short lines much like the fisherman casts to the shallow water knowing that’s where the big fish are. Don’t be lulled into the clean structure of his verse. His poems bring clarity to complexity. Hannah does not muddle the waters with these poems. These poems act to amplify what lies below the surface. This is an accessible collect of insightful poems that tests the parameters of the reader’s concrete understanding of things. A great read for all.

                         --Michael Blaine





Sound Effects

Poetry by Nina Bennett

Chapbook Number Four in The Key Poetry Series

If Nina Bennett’s well observed world doesn’t make you take deep breaths you’re only 10% alive. Her contemporary life is tugged by the irresistible forces of loss; and special bonds found in paradoxical places. The undercurrents are memory—the motive is love -- the writing is flawless.                                                                                                                 — Grace Cavalieri: Host/Producer                                                                    “The Poet and the Poem  from the Library of Congress.”


 






Taken Away

Poetry by Carolyn Cecil

Chapbook Number Five in The Key Poetry Series

The clarity in Cecil’s work comes from a spare poetic conceit that surprises us with its power and substance. She’s a custodian of crystalline moments that provoke as they calm. Her understanding of human behavior is solid, and she forwards this to the world, gift wrapped in exactly the right language. 

               -- Grace Cavalieri: Producer                                                                              “The Poet and the Poem from the Library of Congress.”









Where Night Comes From

Poetry by Shea Garvin

Chapbook Number Six in The Key Poetry Series

The neon night deceives us, sinners are saints, and the truth dim and getting dimmer in these poems from Shea Garvin. Internal states, without street signs, circle back to night thoughts, dreams, wanderings doing their dark mind-dance. Poet on the run from nothing travels through the night on foot, on train, on bus, in flight, nocturnal wisdom wrenched from the flickering light finds “dark twists / behind these symbols.”

       —Bernard Jankowski









Sakura

a cycle of haiku

by Jamie Brown

Sakura (Cherry Blossoms) reflects on the cycle of love from its first buds to full blossom to autumnal afterglow.  Though each of love’s moments may be as evanescent as a cherry blossom, lifelong love, like a cherry tree, blooms many times. Sakura is a pleasure to read and reflect upon.                                                                 —Howard Gofreed













The Softened Ground


Tina Raye Dayton received her Master of Fine Arts in Writing from Sarah Lawrence College. Her poems have appeared in a number of journals including Potomac ReviewThe Delmarva ReviewThe Broadkill Review, Amaranth, and So to Speak. Tina is a native of Salisbury, Maryland and works as a reading therapist in her private tutoring practice. She shares her home and heart with her mathematician husband and beautiful little girl. This is her first chapbook.

“Dayton's voice quietly fills the page, offers up familiar landscapes such as frozen fields, a dark neighborhood, or a kitchen table, and uses them to express the loss of a loved one, the connection between people and the natural spaces we inhabit, and the occasional violence we uncover in our ordinary lives.”  

—Scott Whitaker, National Book Critics Circle

 






Salmagundi

Sherry Gage Chappelle’s long-running 

roles have included 

English major, mother, grand-mother, 

teacher, professor, native 

New Englander, student and 

singer. She loves puns, 

Tchaikovsky, 

Cole Porter, 

Shakers, Salem 

witches, Kid’s Lit,

New Hampshire lakes, Maine 

Coon cats, yoga, ten year olds 

and too many writers to list. Poetry 

gets her up in the morning, 

but away from her desk she also 

is the dramaturge for the Clear 

Space Theater Company, the 

long running facilitator of the 

Browseabout Book Club, and a soprano in several local ensembles. Forces 

that have kept her pen in her hand include the supportive Delaware poetry 

community, the Delaware Division of the Arts, and her husband, Bruce.

"If anyone ever doubts the power of the word 

to leave the page and inflame passions, and 

to introduce a rich tapestry of images, 

Sherry Gage Chappelle’s Salmagundi prove 

it possible."         

— a. mclean

"Salmagundi plays with language, feasts on 

words without sacrificing control or  composition; 

what all writers hope for, a concert of 

words and images."

      

— Scott Whitaker (NBCC)







Constructing Fiction

Constructing Fiction is a gift to the young or would-be writers of short stories and novels. In plain, no-nonsense prose, Jamie Brown takes the reader for a walk through the world of fiction writing—avoiding the alleys and dead-end streets that so often lure new writers with promises of shortcuts. Here is advice that all writers—those young in the work, and old hands—can actually use.                              

— H. A. Maxson

 

Constructing Fiction is a must for green writers looking to cut their teeth with short fiction, especially for those who over-think their prose, their process. From notes on character names to telling the author to trust the subconscious and “to get out of the way,” Brown, like Frank O'Hara, dares the writer to go “on your nerve.”

— Scott Whitaker  (NBCC)

 





  Fractured Light 

AMANDA NEWELL teaches English at Gunston Day School in Centreville, Maryland and has  previously been a Visiting Lecturer at the University of Paris, Creteil, France. Her work is published or forthcoming in Bellevue Literary Review, Tar River Poetry, Poet Lore, The Delmarva Review, and Little Patuxent Review. A contributor at the 2010 the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference at Middlebury College, she lives on the Eastern Shore with her husband Jonathan and their two boys, Jake and Ben. 

Fractured Light offers intimate, fearful, and sometimes cautious moments, captured by the eye of the poet who is like a bird circling the field where deer carcasses lay and blood trails into the darkness of the forest.  The eye misses nothing, the valient hunter, the anxious mother, the family waiting for the hunting party to come home.  Newell's work offers surprises, and delights with ear and eye." 

                               -- Scott Whitaker (NBCC) 

 



Loopholes 

DAVID P. KOZINSKI’s poems have appeared in more than 20 literary publications in print and online and have  earned him numerous national and regional awards. He has read his work at venues in Delaware, Pennsylvania and  New Jersey and was the guest poet on  Berks County (Pa.) Television's Poets'  Pause program in June 2009. His poems have earned him nominations for the prestigious Pushcart Prize by both the Schuylkill Valley Journal and Mad Poets Review. Kozinski was one of ten poets selected by internationally-renowned poet Robert Bly for his work-shop sponsored by the American Poetry Review. His brother, internationally-acclaimed composer and conductor Stefan Kozinski, created a song cycle from five of his poems which debuted in Dessau, Germany in 2008. Kozinski has also read his poetry in conjunction with exhibitions of his visual art. In 2006, he unveiled 30 years’ worth of his abstract art at the Manayunk Art Center in Philadelphia and has since regularly staged exhibitions in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. Kozinski's artwork now hangs in private collections in eight states. In 2007 he received the Dr. Eugene J. Szatkowski Achievement Award for his poetry and visual art. Kozinski lives in Wilmington, Del. with his wife, actress and journalist Patti Allis Mengers. 

 

Visit our other imprint site, The Broadkill River Press, for full-length books of poetry and fiction!

Subpages (1): The Key Poetry Series