私たちが幸せを感じる理由

ダン?ギルバート:「私たちが幸せを感じる理由」

Dan Gilbert: The surprising science of happiness

YouTube 動画

YouTube 動画


「私たちが幸せを感じる理由」 の英文日本語訳と感想

(興味があれば読んでください)

英文日本語訳資料


When you have 21 minutes to speak, two million years seems like a really long time. 
21分間の講演時間と比べると  200万年という時間は非常に長いものに感じられますね

But evolutionarily, two million years is nothing. 
しかし進化論という側面から見ると、200万年は0年も同様です

And yet in two million years the human brain has nearly tripled in mass,
それでも人間の脳は、200万年の間におよそ3倍もの大きさになりました

going from the one-and-a-quarter pound brain of our ancestor here,
約700グラムの脳を持つ私たちの祖先、

Habilis, to the almost three-pound meatloaf that everybody here has between their ears.
ホモハビリスから 現在私たちの両耳の間にある脳は約1400グラムにまでなったのです

What is it about a big brain that nature was so eager for every one of us to have one?
進化の過程において、このような大きな脳を各人がもつ必要性はなんだったのでしょう

Well, it turns out when brains triple in size, they don't just get three times bigger;
それは、脳が3倍の大きさになったとき ただ単に容積が3倍になっただけではなく、

they gain new structures.
脳は新たな構造を獲得したのです

And one of the main reasons our brain got so big is because it got a new part, called the "frontal lobe.
新しいパーツを得たことが、脳がここまで大きくなったことの理由のひとつなのです

" And particularly, a part called the "pre-frontal cortex."
前頭葉、その中でも特に、前頭葉皮質と呼ばれる部分です

Now what does a pre-frontal cortex do for you that should justify the entire architectural overhaul of the human skull in the blink of evolutionary time?
前頭葉皮質がどのような働きをするのかが分かれば   進化論における一瞬の時間で脳の全ての構造が変わった理由も分かるはずですね

Well, it turns out the pre-frontal cortex does lots of things,
さて、どうやら前頭葉皮質には多くの役目がありそうです 

but one of the most important things it does is it is an experience simulator.
なかでも一番重要な役目は 疑似体験をすることです 

Flight pilots practice in flight simulators so that they don't make real mistakes in planes.
パイロットは模擬飛行装置を使って操縦訓練をします  これは、実際に飛行機を操縦するときにミスを犯さないためですね

Human beings have this marvelous adaptation that they can actually have experiences in their heads before they try them out in real life.
人間にはこの驚くべき模擬体験装置があって 経験を頭の中ですることができるのです

This is a trick that none of our ancestors could do,
実生活の中で経験するよりも先に、です これは私たちのいかなる祖先も

and that no other animal can do quite like we can. It's a marvelous adaptation.
また他のどの動物も同じようにはできない驚異的な技なのです

It's up there with opposable thumbs and standing upright 
向かい合わせにできる親指や直立二足歩行、

and language as one of the things that got our species out of the trees and into the shopping mall.
そして言語と共に 人類の生活の中心を森林から ショッピングモールに変えた要因のひとつなのです

Now -- (Laughter) -- all of you have done this.
さて-(笑)- みなさんもこれと同じことをしているのです 

I mean, you know, Ben and Jerry's doesn't have liver-and-onion ice cream,
そうですね ベン&ジェリーズアイスクリームには、レバー&オニオン味のアイスクリームなんてありません

and it's not because they whipped some up, tried it and went, "Yuck." 
それは実際にいくつか作り試食して「うえー」となったからではなく

It's because, without leaving your armchair,
机から離れなくとも 

you can simulate that flavor and say "yuck" before you make it.
その味を想像し、実際に作る前に「うえー」と言えるからなのです

Let's see how your experience simulators are working.
では実際に私たちがどのように疑似体験をしているのかみてみましょう 

Let's just run a quick diagnostic before I proceed with the rest of the talk.
話を進める前にここで簡単なテストをしてみます 

Here's two different futures that I invite you to contemplate,
ここに2種類の違った未来があります 

and you can try to simulate them 
これら2つを疑似体験してみて、

and tell me which one you think you might prefer.
どちらの方が好ましいか教えてください

One of them is winning the lottery.
ひとつは宝くじを当てる未来です

This is about 314 million dollars.
これは3億円くらいはありますね 

And the other is becoming paraplegic.
そしてもうひとつは下半身麻痺になる未来です

So, just give it a moment of thought. 
さあ考えてみてください 

You probably don't feel like you need a moment of thought.
きっと考える必要なんてないと思う方もいらっしゃるでしょう

Interestingly, there are data on these two groups of people, 
興味深いことに、2つのケースの実際のデータがあるのです

data on how happy they are.
実際彼らはどれくらい幸せなのでしょうか

And this is exactly what you expected, isn't it?
予想したとおりでしょう?

But these aren't the data. I made these up!
 けれどもこれは、私が作りあげたウソのデータなのです

These are the data.
こちらが本当のデータです

You failed the pop quiz, and you're hardly five minutes into the lecture.
みなさん講演開始5分にして、もう落第です

Because the fact is that a year after losing the use of their legs, and a year after winning the lotto,
実際のところは、脚の機能が失われた1年後と宝くじを当てた1年後とでは 

lottery winners and paraplegics are equally happy with their lives.
宝くじの当選者と下半身麻痺の患者は 人生において同等の幸福を感じているのです

Now, don't feel too bad about failing the first pop quiz, 
最初のテストで間違ったからといってがっかりしないでください

because everybody fails all of the pop quizzes all of the time.
誰もが全てのテストで毎回同じように間違うのですから

The research that my laboratory has been doing,
私の研究室や、

that economists and psychologists around the country have been doing,
国中の経済学者 心理学者がしている研究において

have revealed something really quite startling to us,
極めて驚くべきことがわかってきています

something we call the "impact bias," which is the tendency for the simulator to work badly.
衝撃偏向と呼ばれるもので 疑似体験の働きを悪くする傾向のことです

For the simulator to make you believe that different outcomes are more different than in fact they really are.
疑似体験の中では結果の違いが 実際以上に大きいと思ってしまうのです

From field studies to laboratory studies,
フィールドワークや実験室での研究において分かってきたのは 

we see that winning or losing an election,
選挙に当選しようが落選しようが、

gaining or losing a romantic partner,
生涯のパートナーを得ようが失おうが 

getting or not getting a promotion,
仕事で昇進してもしなくても

passing or not passing a college test, on and on, have far less impact,
大学入試に受かっても落ちてもどんなことが起こったって 

less intensity and much less duration than people expect them to have.
本人は私たちが思うほど衝撃を受けていなければ感情的にもなっていない そんなにそれを引きずってはいないということです 

In fact, a recent study -- this almost floors me -- 
実際最近の研究ではーこれには閉口してしまうのですがー 

a recent study showing how major life traumas affect people suggests that if it happened over three months ago,
人生における最大のトラウマがその人に及ぼす影響について もしそれが3ヶ月以上前に起こったとすると 

with only a few exceptions, it has no impact whatsoever on your happiness.
多少の例外はあるにしても その人の幸せにはなんの影響も与えないということがわかったのです

Why? Because happiness can be synthesized.
なぜでしょう 幸せは作り出すことができるからです 

Sir Thomas Brown wrote in 1642, 
トーマス ブラウンは1642年に著書の中でこう述べました 

"I am the happiest man alive.
'私は世界一幸せな人間だ

I have that in me that can convert poverty to riches, adversity to prosperity.
貧を富に変える力も、逆境を順境に変える力も持っているのだから

I am more invulnerable than Achilles;
私はあのアキレウスより不死身なのだ

fortune hath not one place to hit me." 
どんな強運の持ち主も、 私を射止めることはできないだろう" と 

What kind of remarkable machinery does this guy have in his head?
一体彼の頭の構造はどれほど奇なるものだったのでしょう

Well, it turns out it's precisely the same remarkable machinery that all off us have.
なんと、それは私たちと全く同じだったのです 

Human beings have something that we might think of as a "psychological immune system."
人類には心理的な免疫システムのようなものがあります

A system of cognitive processes, largely non-conscious cognitive processes,
認知プロセス、ほとんどは意識下で行われているシステムなのですが

that help them change their views of the world,
これは自分が属する世界をより良いものに感じられるように

so that they can feel better about the worlds in which they find themselves.
世界の見え方を変えてくれるのです

Like Sir Thomas, you have this machine.
トーマス ブラウン同様誰もが持つシステムなのですが

Unlike Sir Thomas, you seem not to know it. (Laughter)
彼とは違って、誰もその存在に気づいていないようです

We synthesize happiness,
幸せは作り出すものなのに、

but we think happiness is a thing to be found.
見つけるものだと考えてしまうのです

Now, you don't need me to give you too many examples of people synthesizing happiness,I suspect. 
人々が実際に幸せを作り出す例はそんなにたくさん必要ないでしょうが

Though I'm going to show you some experimental evidence, you don't have to look very far for evidence.
これからいくつかの実験的証拠をお見せします 証拠は身近なところにあるのです

As a challenge to myself, since I say this once in a while in lectures,
自分への挑戦として、以前私が外部の講義で目にした 

I took a copy of the New York Times and tried to find some instances of people synthesizing happiness.
ニューヨークタイムズの記事のコピーを使って人々が幸せを作り出す実例を探しました

And here are three guys synthesizing happiness.
 こちらが幸せを作り出した3人です

"I am so much better off physically, financially,emotionally, mentally 
 '肉体的にも経済的にも、感情的にも精神的にも、

and almost every other way."
ほぼ全てにおいて向上した"

"I don't have one minute's regret. 
'何ひとつ後悔はない"

It was a glorious experience." 
"栄光のある経験をしたと思っている"

"I believe it turned out for the best."
'結果的にベストだったと信じている"

Who are these characters who are so damn happy? Well, 
これほどまでに幸せを感じられる人とは一体誰なのでしょうか 

the first one is Jim Wright.
最初の一言はジム ライトのものです 

Some of you are old enough to remember:
何人かの方々は覚えていらっしゃるでしょう

he was the chairman of the House of Representatives 
彼はかつての下院議長だったのですが

and he resigned in disgrace when this young Republican named Newt Gingrich found out about a shady book deal he had done.
ニュート ギングリッチという若手の共和党議員によって裏工作を暴かれ その不祥事を理由に辞任しました

He lost everything. The most powerful Democrat in the country, he lost everything.
 国中から最強と言われたこの民主党議員は 全てを失いました

He lost his money; he lost his power.
金も権力も失った彼は

What does he have to say all these years later about it?
この経験について後々何と語るかと言えば?

"I am so much better off physically, financially, mentally and in almost every other way."
 '肉体的にも経済的にも、感情的にも精神的にも ほぼ全てにおいて向上した"

What other way would there be to be better off? 
 これ以上一体何を向上させることができるでしょう

Vegetably? Minerally? Animally? He's pretty much covered them there.
菜食面?ミネラル面?肉食面?彼は全てを制覇してしまったのです

Moreese Bickham is somebody you've never heard of.
モリース ビッカムという名前はきっと耳にしたことがないでしょう 

Moreese Bickham uttered these words upon being released.
彼は釈放されたときにこれらの言葉を述べました

He was 78 years old. He spent 37 years in a Louisiana State Penitentiary for a crime he didn't commit.
78歳の彼はそのうち37年を 犯してもいない罪のためにルイジアナ州の拘置所で過ごしました

He was ultimately exonerated, at the age of 78, through DNA evidence.
DNA鑑定の結果最終的に 78歳で無罪が確定したのです 

And what did he have to say about his experience?
この経験について彼が述べずにはいられなかったことは

"I don't have one minute's regret.
'何ひとつ後悔はない 

It was a glorious experience."
栄光のある経験をしたと思っている"だったのです

Glorious! This guy is not saying,
栄光ですって!彼が言うべきことは

"Well, you know, there were some nice guys. They had a gym."
'拘置所は何も悪い人ばかりだったってわけじゃないよ ジムもあったし" 

It's "glorious," a word we usually reserve for something like a religious experience.
ではなく"栄光ある経験"だったのです  我々が普通宗教的経験を述べるときのためにとっておくような言葉を彼は使ったのです

Harry S. Langerman uttered these words, and he's somebody you might have known but didn't,
ハリー ランガーマンのことは知っている方も知らない方もいらっしゃるでしょう


because in 1949 he read a little article in the paper about a hamburger stand owned by these two brothers named McDonalds.
彼は1949年に、マクドナルドという2人の兄弟が経営する 

And he thought, "That's a really neat idea!" 
ハンバーガー売店の記事を新聞で目にして 'これはいいアイデアだ!"と考えました 

So he went to find them.
彼は兄弟を探しあて会いに行くと

They said, "We can give you a franchise on this for 3,000 bucks."
"3000ドルで チェーン店の営業権をあげるよ"と言われました 

Harry went back to New York, asked his brother who's an investment banker to loan him the 3,000 dollars,
ハリーはニューヨークに戻り投資銀行をしている兄に3000ドルの ローンを願いでました

and his brother's immortal words were,
彼の兄の忘れられない一言は

"You idiot, nobody eats hamburgers." 
'ばかいうな 誰もハンバーガーなんて食いやしないよ"でした

He wouldn't lend him the money,
彼はハリーに金を融資しませんでした

and of course six months later Ray Croc had exactly the same idea.
当然のことながら6カ月後 レイ クロックが同じことを思いついたのです

It turns out people do eat hamburgers,
民衆はハンバーガーを食べるのです 

and Ray Croc, for a while, became the richest man in America.
レイ クロックはしばらくしてアメリカ一の富豪になりました

And then finally -- you know, the best of all possible worlds --
最後に――最もポジティブであったのは―― お分かりですね

some of you recognize this young photo of Pete Best,
若かりし頃のピート ベストです

who was the original drummer for the Beatles,
彼はビートルズの初代ドラマーでした

 until they, you know, sent him out on an errand and snuck away and picked up Ringo on a tour.
ご存じの通り訳の分からない理由で解雇され ツアー中にビートルズと親交を深めたリンゴが後を継ぎました

Well, in 1994, when Pete Best was interviewed -
1994年にインタビューを受けたとき

- yes, he's still a drummer; yes, he's a studio musician --
ピート ベストは ――彼は現在もドラマーであり ミュージシャンであるわけですが―― '

he had this to say: "I'm happier than I would have been with the Beatles."
ビートルズに在籍していた頃より幸せだ"と言ったのです

Okay. There's something important to be learned from these people,
どうやら彼らから何か大切なことが学べそうです 

and it is the secret of happiness.
これこそが、幸せの秘訣なのです

Here it is, finally to be revealed. 
こちらです、やっと辿り着きましたね 

First: accrue wealth, power, and prestige, then lose it. (Laughter) 
その1:富や権力、名誉をどんどん手に入れて それら全てを失いましょう――(笑)

Second: spend as much of your life in prison as you possibly can. (Laughter)
その2:人生でできるだけ多くの時間を刑務所で過ごしましょう――(笑)

Third: make somebody else really, really rich. (Laughter) 
その3:誰か自分以外の人を大金持ちにしましょう――(笑)

And finally: never ever join the Beatles. (Laughter)
そして最後に:なにがあってもビートルズには入らないこと――(笑)――

OK. Now I, like Ze Frank, can predict your next thought, 
さて、ジー フランク同様私には次にみなさんが思うことがわかります

which is, "Yeah, right."
みなさん"あっそ"と思っているでしょう

Because when people synthesize happiness, as these gentlemen seem to have done, 
彼ら3人のように人が幸せを作り出したとき 

we all smile at them, but we kind of roll our eyes and say, 
我々は顔では笑っていても少しあきれて

"Yeah right, you never really wanted the job."
'あっそ、きっと実はそんな仕事したくなかったんだよ"とか

"Oh yeah, right. You really didn't have that much in common with her,
'あのね、君は彼女と そんなに共通点なんてなかったんだから

and you figured that out just about the time she threw the engagement ring in your face."
 彼女に婚約指輪を突き返される前に 気がついてよかったじゃないか"と言うんです

We smirk because we believe that synthetic happiness is not of the same quality as what we might call "natural happiness."
苦笑いをするのは、人工的幸福はいわゆる 自然発生的幸福ほど価値がないと考えてしまうからなのです 

What are these terms?
これらの幸福とは何でしょう 

Natural happiness is what we get when we get what we wanted, 
自然発生的幸福とは欲したものが手に入ることです

and synthetic happiness is what we make when we don't get what we wanted.
そして人工的幸福とは欲したものが手に入らなかったときに自ら作り出す幸福です

And in our society, we have a strong belief that synthetic happiness is of an inferior kind.
私たちの属する社会では人工的幸福は 二流の幸福であるという強い信念が横行しているのです

Why do we have that belief?
どうしてそう思ってしまうのでしょうか

Well, it's very simple.
理由はとても簡単です 

What kind of economic engine would keep churning if we believed that not getting what we want could make us just as happy as getting it?
欲しいものが手に入っても入らなくても 私たちが同等の幸福を感じるならば 経済のエンジンは回らなくなってしまうでしょう

With all apologies to my friend Matthieu Ricard,
我が友マシュー リカードには大変申し訳ないのですが

a shopping mall full of Zen monks is not going to be particularly profitable
禅僧侶であふれているショッピングモールは そんなに利益が上がらないでしょう

because they don't want stuff enough.
僧侶はそんなにものを欲しがらないのですから 

I want to suggest to you that synthetic happiness is every bit as real and enduring as the kind of happiness you stumble upon when you get exactly what you were aiming for.
人工的幸福はその細部にわたるまで 自分がまさに望んでいるものを手にするという幸せと 同じくらいリアルであり 長続きするものです

Now, I'm a scientist, 
私は科学者なので

so I'm going to do this not with rhetoric, 
修辞学的ではなく

but by marinating you in a little bit of data.
データを使って話していこうと思います

Let me first show you an experimental paradigm that is used to demonstrate the synthesis of happiness among regular old folks.
まずはじめに一般的な成人の人工的幸福を 証拠づけるための実験をお見せしましょう 

And this isn't mine. 
これは私のものではありません 

This is a 50-year-old paradigm called the "free choice paradigm."
これは50歳の人の範例で自由選択に関するものです 

It's very simple.
実験は簡単です 何

You bring in, say, six objects, 
かしら物を、例えば6つくらい持っていって 

and you ask a subject to rank them from the most to the least liked.
被験者にそれらを好きな順にランク付けしてもらいのです

In this case, because the experiment I'm going to tell you about uses them, 
範例なのでみなさんにあらかじめ何を使うかお教えしておきます

these are Monet prints.
今回はモネの絵です 

So, everybody can rank these Monet prints from the one they like the most, to the one they like the least.
被験者らはこれらのモネの絵を 一番好きなものから一番気に入らないものへと順に並べます

Now we give you a choice: 
ここでひとつの選択肢を与えます: 

"We happen to have some extra prints in the closet.
'予備の絵がまだ、たまたまクローゼットに残っているんです

We're going to give you one as your prize to take home.
今日の実験のお礼にひとつ差し上げますよ

We happen to have number three and number four," we tell the subject.
3番と4番の絵が残っているみたいです"と 

This is a bit of a difficult choice, 
少し難しい選択ですね なぜなら 

because neither one is preferred strongly to the other,
どちらの絵も他と比べてそんなに好きではなかったのですから

but naturally, people tend to pick number three 
けれども自然と人は3番を選ぶ傾向があるのです

because they liked it a little better than number four.
4番の絵よりは好きだったのですからね

Sometime later -- it could be 15 minutes; it could be 15 days --
いくらか時間が経った後――15分後もしくは 15日後かもしれません――

the same stimuli are put before the subject,
被験者の前に同じ絵を並べ 

and the subject is asked to re-rank the stimuli. 
再度ランク付けをしてもらいます

"Tell us how much you like them now."
 '現時点ではどうですか"と言って

What happens?
 さてどうなるでしょう

Watch as happiness is synthesized.
彼らが幸せを作り出す様子をご覧ください 

This is the result that has been replicated over and over again.
こちらが何度も再現されている結果です

You're watching happiness be synthesized. 
幸せが作り出されています 

Would you like to see it again?
もう一度ご覧になりますか?

Happiness!
 はい、幸せ!

"The one I got is really better than I thought! 
'私が選んだ絵は思ってたよりずっといいわ! 

That other one I didn't get sucks!" (Laughter)
選んでない方の絵は大したことない!" ――(笑)

That's the synthesis of happiness.
これが人工的幸福です

Now what's the right response to that?
さてみなさんの反応は?

"Yeah, right!" Now, here's the experiment we did,
"まあ、そうかもね" 次に私たちが行った実験です

and I would hope this is going to convince you that "Yeah, right!" was not the right response.
このデータがみなさんの その反応が 間違いだと説得できればと思います

We did this experiment with a group of patients who had anterograde amnesia.
この実験は入院中の 前向性健忘症の患者らと共に行いました

These are hospitalized patients. Most of them have Korsakoff's syndrome,
患者の多くはコルサコフ症候群という 

a polyneuritic psychosis that -- they drank way too much, and they can't make new memories. OK?
多発性の神経障害にかかっています 暴飲の結果 新しい記憶を作ることができないのです

They remember their childhood,
要するに幼児期の記憶はあるのですが

but if you walk in and introduce yourself,
我々が部屋に入り自己紹介をして

and then leave the room, when you come back,
部屋を一旦はなれ また戻ってくると

they don't know who you are.
彼らは我々を認識できないのです

We took our Monet prints to the hospital.
私たちはモネの絵を病院に持って行き

And we asked these patients to rank them from the one they liked the most to the one they liked the least.
患者らにそれらの絵を 一番好きなものから順に並べてもらいました 

We then gave them the choice between number three and number four.
そして先ほどの実験と同様に3番か4番かを選んでもらったのです

Like everybody else, they said, 
他のみんなと同じように彼らも

"Gee, thanks Doc! That's great! I could use a new print.
 'ありがとうございます先生 新しい壁掛けにします

I'll take number three." 
3番をいただけますか"と言います

We explained we would have number three mailed to them.
3番の絵はまた後日宅急便で送りますと言って

We gathered up our materials and we went out of the room, 
全ての荷物を持って私たちは部屋を出ました

and counted to a half hour.
それから30分待って 部屋に戻り

Back into the room, we say, "Hi, we're back."
"どうも戻りました"と声をかけました

The patients, bless them, say, 
患者らとの会話は:

"Ah, Doc, I'm sorry, I've got a memory problem; that's why I'm here.
"ああ、先生すみません 私は記憶障害でここにいるんです

If I've met you before, I don't remember."
 以前お会いしていたとしても思い出せないんです"

 "Really, Jim, you don't remember?
 '覚えていないのかい?

I was just here with the Monet prints?"
さっきモネの絵を持ってきたんだけど" 

"Sorry, Doc, I just don't have a clue."
'すみません、全く覚えていないんです"

"No problem, Jim. All I want you to do is rank these for me from the one you like the most to the one you like the least."
 'いいんだよ ただ、これらの絵を好きなものから順に 並べてもらえないかな"

What do they do? 
さあ彼らはどうするでしょう 

Well, let's first check and make sure they're really amnesiac.
まず最初に 彼らが本当に記憶喪失症かどうか確かめましょう

We ask these amnesiac patients to tell us which one they own,
患者らに自分の絵はどれかと尋ねました 彼らが先ほど選んだ絵です

which one they chose last time, which one is theirs. And what we find is amnesiac patients just guess.
彼らはどうやら当てずっぽうに答えているようです

These are normal controls, where if I did this with you, all of you would know which print you chose.
こちら緑が正常者です みなさんに同じ質問をしたら 全員自分の絵がどれか分かるでしょう 

But if I do this with amnesiac patients, they don't have a clue.
しかし同じことを記憶喪失の患者に尋ねたピンクでは

They can't pick their print out of a lineup.
 彼らには自分の絵を選び出す手掛かりがないのです

Here's what normal controls do: they synthesize happiness. Right?
正常者は幸せを作り出すのでしたよね

This is the change in liking score, the change from the first time they ranked to the second time they ranked.
絵のランク表は 最初の順番と2番目の順番はこのように変わります

Normal controls show -- that was the magic I showed you;
正常者は ――先ほどお見せしたマジックを 

now I'm showing it to you in graphical form 
グラフでお見せしています 

-- "The one I own is better than I thought.
'自分が選んだ絵は予想より良かった。

The one I didn't own, the one I left behind, is not as good as I thought." Amnesiacs do exactly the same thing.
選ばず残った方は 思っていたほど良くはなかったな"と言います なんと記憶喪失患者も全く同じ結果を出したのです

Think about this result.

These people like better the one they own, 
彼らも自分の絵をより好んだのです 

but they don't know they own it.
自分の絵だとは知らないままに

"Yeah, right" is not the right response!
'まあ、そうかもね"は正しい答えではないのです!

What these people did when they synthesized happiness is they really, truly changed their affective, hedonic, aesthetic reactions to that poster.
これらの患者らが幸せを作り出したとき 彼らは本当に 絵に対する快楽、美的反応を変えたのです

They're not just saying it because they own it,
自分の絵だからそうしているのではないのです

because they don't know they own it.
だって彼らにはそれが自分の絵だとは分からないのですから

Now, when psychologists show you bars, 
さて、このようなグラフをご覧になった時に 

you know that they are showing you averages of lots of people.
それは多くの人間の平均だということはおわかりですね 

And yet, all of us have this psychological immune system, this capacity to synthesize happiness,
この心理的免疫システム、つまり幸福を作り出す能力は 私たち全てに備わっています

but some of us do this trick better than others.
しかしこの能力を人並み以上に使いこなせる人もいます

And some situations allow anybody to do it more effectively than other situations do.
またこの能力を より効果的に発揮できる状況も存在します

It turns out that freedom -- the ability to make up your mind and change your mind -- is the friend of natural happiness,
自由というものは -意思決定をし、またその意思を変える能力のことですね - 自然発生的幸福の友です 

because it allows you to choose among all those delicious futures and find the one that you would most enjoy.
なぜなら数々の魅力的な未来から 各々が最も楽しめるものを選ばせてくれるのですから

But freedom to choose -- to change and make up your mind -- is the enemy of synthetic happiness.
 しかし意思の決定や 変更における選択の自由は、人工的幸福にとっては敵であります 

And I'm going to show you why.
なぜだか説明いたしましょう

Dilbert already knows, of course.
ディルバートはもちろん知っています

You're reading the cartoon as I'm talking. 
こちらはコミックからです ”

"Dogbert's tech support. How may I abuse you?" 
ドッグバードのテックサポートです”

"My printer prints a blank page after every document."
プリンターが白紙ページばかりだしてくるんです”

"Why would you complain about getting free paper?"
 ”タダでもらえる紙になぜ文句を言うんですか” 

"Free? Aren't you just giving me my own paper?"
”タダ?でもこれもともと自分の紙ですよ”

"Egad, man! Look at the quality of the free paper compared to your lousy regular paper!
 ”全く!お前さんの荒い紙質と タダ紙の紙質をよく見てみなさい

Only a fool or a liar would say that they look the same!"
 愚か者か嘘つきしか、同じだなんて言わないよ”

"Ah! Now that you mention it, it does seem a little silkier!"
 ああ!言われてみれば確かに絹のようだ!”

"What are you doing?"
 ”何してるんだ?” 

"I'm helping people accept the things they cannot change." Indeed.
”変えられないものを受け入れる手助けをしているのさ”その通り

The psychological immune system works best when we are totally stuck, when we are trapped.
心理的免疫システムは私たちが 袋小路に入り込んだときに最も効果的にはたらきます

This is the difference between dating and marriage, right?
これはデートと結婚の違いと同じでしょう? 

I mean, you go out on a date with a guy, 
ある男性とデートに出掛けると 

and he picks his nose; 
彼が鼻をほじりました

you don't go out on another date.
もう彼とはデートに行きません 

You're married to a guy and he picks his nose? Yeah,
ではあなたが結婚した彼が鼻をほじったら?

he has a heart of gold; don't touch the fruitcake. Right? (Laughter)
うーん、彼は優しい人だから その手でケーキは触らないでね、  でしょう?(笑)

You find a way to be happy with what's happened.
出来事に対応した幸せを見つけることができるんです

Now what I want to show you is that people don't know this about themselves,
さて、ここから私がお見せしたいのは このような働きは一般的には知られていないことと

and not knowing this can work to our supreme disadvantage.
 知らないことが大いに不利になり得るということです

Here's an experiment we did at Harvard.
こちらはハーバードで行った実験です

We created a photography course, 
フォトグラフィーコースを開設して

a black-and-white photography course,
白黒写真のコースですが

and we allowed students to come in and learn how to use a darkroom.
学生らに参加させ、暗室の使い方も教えました

So we gave them cameras; they went around campus;
まずカメラを持った彼らはキャンパスを歩き回ります

they took 12 pictures of their favorite professors and their dorm room and their dog, 
好きな教授や寮の自室、ペットの犬など 

and all the other things they wanted to have Harvard memories of.
ハーバードの思い出がつまった12枚の写真を撮ってもらいます

They bring us the camera; we make up a contact sheet;
  それからカメラを回収し印刷紙を準備して

they figure out which are the two best pictures;
 出来のいい2枚の写真を選びます

and we now spend six hours teaching them about darkrooms.
次に6時間かけて暗室の使い方を教え

And they blow two of them up, 
2枚を現像させます

and they have two gorgeous eight-by-10 glossies of meaningful things to them, and we say,
2枚の見事な8×10の、思い出のつまった 光沢写真を前に我々は彼らに ”

"Which one would you like to give up?" 
どちらかを手放さなければならないのだが”と言います

They say, "I have to give one up?"
 学生は、”一枚手放すのですか?”

"Oh, yes. We need one as evidence of the class project.
そうなんだ 授業のプロジェクトの証拠としてね 

So you have to give me one.
一枚もらわなきゃならないんだ 

You have to make a choice. You get to keep one,  and I get to keep one."
どちらか決めておくれ 君に一枚、私に一枚だ”

Now, there are two conditions in this experiment.
さて、ここからがこの実験の2つの条件です 

In one case, the students are told,
一つのケースでは、学生にこう言います ”

"But you know, if you want to change your mind,
でもまあ もし気が変わったのなら、

I'll always have the other one here, 
写真はまだ私が持っているから

and in the next four days, before I actually mail it to headquarters,
これから4日間、実際に本部に送るまでは 

I'll be glad to" -- (Laughter) -- yeah, "headquarters" -- 
――(笑)―― そう”本部”です 

"I'll be glad to swap it out with you.
いつでも交換できるから 

In fact, I'll come to your dorm room and give 
ほんと 君の寮まで届けてあげるよ 

-- just give me an email.
メールを送ってくれ 

Better yet, I'll check with you.
いっそのこと、一緒にチェックしよう 

You ever want to change your mind, it's totally returnable."
もし気が変わったなら、必ず交換するよ”と

The other half of the students are told exactly the opposite: 
残り半分の学生には全く正反対のことを言います

"Make your choice.
すぐに選びなさい

And by the way, the mail is going out, gosh, in two minutes, to England.
2分後にはイングランドに発送しちゃうから 

Your picture will be winging its way over the Atlantic.
君の写真は大西洋を渡っていくから

You will never see it again."
 これが最後の別れだ”と

Now, half of the students in each of these conditions are asked to make predictions about how much they're going to come to like the picture that they keep and the picture they leave behind.
次にそれぞれの条件の学生半数に 手元に残した写真と手放した写真を これからどれくらい好きになるか 予想してもらいます

Other students are just sent back to their little dorm rooms 
残りの学生はひとまず寮に帰して 

and they are measured over the next three to six days on their liking, satisfaction with the pictures. 
それから3日から6日ほど写真への好感度 満足度を量ります 

And look at what we find.
結果をご覧ください

First of all, here's what students think is going to happen.
まず最初に、こちらが学生達の予想です

They think they're going to maybe come to like the picture they chose a little more than the one they left behind,
彼らは手放した写真より手元に残した写真を  恐らく僅かながら好きになるだろうが

but these are not statistically significant differences.
統計的に意義のある差にはならないだろうと思いました

It's a very small increase,
差はほんの僅かで、

and it doesn't much matter whether they were in the reversible or irreversible condition.
交換できるかできないかは 問題ではないと

Wrong-o. Bad simulators.
大間違い 

Because here's what's really happening.
なぜならこちらが本当に起こったことなのです

Both right before the swap and five days later,
交換する前もその5日後も 手元の写真しか残っていない人 

people who are stuck with that picture, who have no choice,
選択肢のない人 絶対に気を変えることのできない人は

who can never change their mind, like it a lot!
写真に多いに満足したのです 

And people who are deliberating 
そして頭を悩ませ考え続けた人

-- "Should I return it?
交換すべきか?

Have I gotten the right one?  Maybe this isn't the good one?
もしかしたらこっちはよくないかも?

Maybe I left the good one?" 
いい方を手放したかも?

-- have killed themselves.
――という考えに押しつぶされてしまったのです

They don't like their picture,
彼らは自分の選んだ写真が好きでなかったし

and in fact even after the opportunity to swap has expired,
実際、交換期限が終わってもまだ その写真が好きにはなれませんでした

they still don't like their picture. Why?
なぜ? 

Because the reversible condition is not conducive to the synthesis of happiness.
交換可能な条件は 人工的幸福と相性が悪いからです

So here's the final piece of this experiment.
さてこちらが最後の実験です 

We bring in a whole new group of naive Harvard students and we say, 
先ほどとは違うグループの純真なハーバードの学生を集め ”

"You know, we're doing a photography course,
フォトグラフィーコースをしているんだけれども 

and we can do it one of two ways.
2パターンあってどっちかに参加して欲しいんだ

We could do it so that when you take the two pictures,
2枚写真を撮ったあと

you'd have four days to change your mind,
4日間考える時間があるコースと

or we're doing another course where you take the two pictures 
2枚写真を撮ったら すぐにどちらか決めて 

and you make up your mind right away and you can never change it.
決して変更はきかないコースだ 

Which course would you like to be in?"
どっちに参加したいか?”

Duh! 66 percent of the students, two-thirds, prefer to be in the course where they have the opportunity to change their mind.
ああ!66%、3分の2の学生が 選択の変更がきくコースを好んだのです 

Hello?
そうなんです 

66 percent of the students choose to be in the course in which they will ultimately be deeply dissatisfied with the picture.
66%の学生が、最終的に写真に 大きな不満を覚えるコースを選んだのです

Because they do not know the conditions under which synthetic happiness grows.
彼らは人工的幸福が生まれる環境を知らないからです

The Bard said everything best, 
シェイクスピアはご存知の通り物事を一番上手く表現します 

of course, and he's making my point here but he's making it hyperbolically:
私の話も、彼はおおげさではありますがこう表現しています 

"'Tis nothing good or bad / But thinking makes it so."
物事の善し悪しなんて本当は存在しない 我々の思考がそのように見せるだけだ

It's nice poetry, 
素敵な詩ではありますが100%正しいはずはありません 

but that can't exactly be right.  Is there really nothing good or bad?
本当に物事の善し悪しは存在しないのでしょうか

Is it really the case that gall bladder surgery and a trip to Paris are just the same thing?
胆嚢の手術とパリ旅行とは本当に同じものなのでしょうか

That seems like a one-question IQ test. 
これはIQテストの質問のようです 

They can't be exactly the same.
両者は100%同じではないのです

In more turgid prose, 
より誇張された散文で、

but closer to the truth, was the father of modern capitalism, Adam Smith, and he said this.
しかしより真実に近いことを 近代資本主義の父、アダム スミスが言っています

This is worth contemplating:
こちらは考え甲斐があります

"The great source of both the misery and disorders of human life seems to arise from overrating the difference between one permanent situation and another ...
人類の生活における苦悩や無秩序の多くは 永続的状況とそれ以外の状況との差異を 過大評価しているところに帰依するようだ

Some of these situations may, no doubt, deserve to be preferred to others,
いくつかの状況は疑いなく他より好ましいものであるが

but none of them can deserve to be pursued with that passionate ardor which drives us to violate the rules either of prudence or of justice,
それらのどれも、慎重さや公平さの規律を犯すまでの 情熱をもってして 追い求める価値はない

or to corrupt the future tranquility of our minds,
また未来の心の平穏さは 

either by shame from the remembrance of our own folly,
自らの愚行の記憶による恥

or by remorse for the horror of our own injustice."
自らの不公平な行いへの 恐怖や後悔によって乱されるべきではない”

In other words: yes, some things are better than others.
 つまり:他より優れているものもあるにはあります

We should have preferences that lead us into one future over another.
ひとつの未来を選び抜く力は持っておくべきです 

But when those preferences drive us too hard and too fast because we have overrated the difference between these futures, we are at risk.
けれどもその選択が異なる未来の差異を過大評価することによって  強引で拙速なものになると  リスクが生じるのです

When our ambition is bounded, it leads us to work joyfully.
望みは限られたものであれば、楽しむことができます

When our ambition is unbounded, it leads us to lie, to cheat, to steal, to hurt others, to sacrifice things of real value.
けれども望みは制限なしだと、我々は嘘をつき人を騙しものを盗み、他人を傷つけ 本当に価値のあるものを犠牲にするのです

When our fears are bounded,
同時に恐怖が限られたものであるなら

we're prudent, we're cautious; we're thoughtful.
我々は用心深く慎重で分別をもって行動できます

When our fears are unbounded and overblown, 
しかし恐怖が限りなく強大なものであれば 

we're reckless, and we're cowardly.
我々は向こう見ずであり臆病になります

The lesson I want to leave you with from these data is that our longings and our worries are both to some degree overblown,
私がこれらのデータを使ってみなさんに伝えたかったことは 私たちの願望や心配は、
 
because we have within us the capacity to manufacture the very commodity we are constantly chasing when we choose experience.
自らの内で作り出されるために どちらも大げさなものとなり その結果 何かを選んだ後も常に別の何かを探し求めているということです

Thank you.
ありがとうございました

単語

ancestor
先祖

frontal lobe
前頭葉

blink
まばたきする、一瞬

adaptation
適応

whipp
ムチを打つ、さっと作る

diagnostic
診断上の

paraplegic
対麻ひ患者

Interestingly
面白く

startling
驚くべきこと

Intensity
強烈、激しい

duration
持続

floor
閉口させる、やり込める

synthesize
統合する、合成する

poverty
貧困

adversity
逆境、不運

prosperity
反映、成功

invulnerable
不死身の

hath
he has.

remarkable
注目すべき、驚くべき

machinery
機会、組織

precisely
正確に、的確に

cognitive
認知の

conscious
意識して

suspect
感づく、~だと思う

damn
すごく、とんでもない

resigned
辞職する

disgrace
不名誉

better off
もっと幸福な状態

uttered
口から出す、打ち明ける

Penitentiary
刑務所

exonerate
逃れる、会脳する

reserve
取っておく、予約する

neat
きちんとした、、綺麗な、巧妙な

immortal
不死の

accrue
利益が手に入る、増える

prestige
名声

roll our eyes
目をぎょろぎょろさせる

smirk
ニヤニヤ笑う

inferior 
下級の

rhetoric
言葉、説明

clue
手がかり

affective
感情的な

hedonic
快楽的な

wing
飛んでいく

statistically
統計的に

deliberate
故意の

conducive
貢献する

hyperbolically
大げさな

gall bladder
たんのう

turgid
誇張した

prose
散文

contemplating
じっくり考える

deserve
価値がある

ardor 
熱心に

prudence
慎重

tranquility
平穏

remorse
良心の呵責

preferences
優先する

ambition
野望

cautious
用心深い

reckless
無謀な

cowardly
臆病

Comments