Exploring the Visual Basic Toolbox
 

The Message Box

 

·    One of the best functions in Visual Basic is the message box.  The message box displays a message, optional icon, and selected set of command buttons.  The user responds by clicking a button.

 

·    The statement form of the message box returns no value (it simply displays the box):

 

MsgBox Message, Type, Title

 

where

 

Message       Text message to be displayed

Type              Type of message box (discussed in a bit)

Title                Text in title bar of message box

 

You have no control over where the message box appears on the screen.

 

·    The function form of the message box returns an integer value (corresponding to the button clicked by the user).  Example of use (Response is returned value):

 

Dim Response as Integer

Response = MsgBox(Message, Type, Title)

 

·         The Type argument is formed by summing four values corresponding to the buttons to display, any icon to show, which button is the default response, and the modality of the message box.

·         The first component of the Type value specifies the buttons to display:

 

Value    Meaning                                 Symbolic Constant

0             OK button only                       vbOKOnly

1             OK/Cancel buttons               vbOKCancel

2             Abort/Retry/Ignore buttons   vbAbortRetryIgnore

3             Yes/No/Cancel buttons        vbYesNoCancel

4             Yes/No buttons                      vbYesNo

5             Retry/Cancel buttons            vbRetryCancel

 

·         The second component of Type specifies the icon to display in the message box:

 

Value    Meaning                                 Symbolic Constant

0             No icon                                    (None)

16           Critical icon                            vbCritical

32           Question mark                       vbQuestion

48           Exclamation point                 vbExclamation

64           Information icon                    vbInformation

 

·    The third component of Type specifies which button is default (i.e. pressing Enter is the same as clicking the default button):

 

Value    Meaning                                 Symbolic Constant

0             First button default                vbDefaultButton1

256        Second button default          vbDefaultButton2

512        Third button default              vbDefaultButton3

 

·    The fourth and final component of Type specifies the modality:

 

Value    Meaning                                 Symbolic Constant

0             Application modal                 vbApplicationModal

4096      System modal                        vbSystemModal

 

If the box is Application Modal, the user must respond to the box before continuing work in the current application.  If the box is System Modal, all applications are suspended until the user responds to the message box.

 

·    Note for each option in Type, there are numeric values listed and symbolic constants.  Recall, it is strongly suggested that the symbolic constants be used instead of the numeric values.  You should agree that vbOKOnly means more than the number 0 when selecting the button type.

 


·    The value returned by the function form of the message box is related to the button clicked:

 

Value    Meaning                                 Symbolic Constant

1             OK button selected               vbOK

2             Cancel button selected        vbCancel

3             Abort button selected            vbAbort

4             Retry button selected            vbRetry

5             Ignore button selected          vbIgnore

6             Yes button selected              vbYes

7             No button selected                vbNo

 

·         Message Box Example:

 

MsgBox “This is an example of a message box”, vbOKCancel + vbInformation, “Message Box Example”

 

 

·    You've seen message boxes if you've ever used a Windows application.  Think of all the examples you've seen.  For example, message boxes are used to ask you if you wish to save a file before exiting and to warn you if a disk drive is not ready.

 

 

Object Methods

 

·         In previous work, we have seen that each object has properties and events associated with it.  A third concept associated with objects is the method.  A method is a procedure or function that imparts some action to an object.

 

·         As we move through the toolbox, when appropriate, we'll discuss object methods.  Methods are always enacted at run-time in code.  The format for invoking a method is:

 

ObjectName.Method {optional arguments}

 

Note this is another use of the dot notation.

 

 


The Form Object

 

·         The Form is where the user interface is drawn.  It is central to the development of Visual Basic applications.

 

·         Form Properties:

 

Appearance       Selects 3-D or flat appearance.

BackColor          Sets the form background color.

BorderStyle       Sets the form border to be fixed or sizeable.

Caption               Sets the form window title.

Enabled              If True, allows the form to respond to mouse and keyboard events; if False, disables form.

Font                     Sets font type, style, size.

ForeColor           Sets color of text or graphics.

Picture                 Places a bitmap picture in the form.

Visible                 If False, hides the form.

 

·         Form Events:

 

Activate               Form_Activate event is triggered when form becomes the active window.

Click                     Form_Click event is triggered when user clicks on form.

DblClick              Form_DblClick event is triggered when user double-clicks on form.

Load                    Form_Load event occurs when form is loaded.  This is a good place to initialize variables and set any run-time properties.

 

·         Form Methods:

 

Cls                        Clears all graphics and text from form.  Does not clear any objects.

Print                     Prints text string on the form.

 

Examples

 

frmExample.Cls ' clears the form

frmExample.Print "This will print on the form"

 

 


Command Buttons

 

·         We've seen the command button before.  It is probably the most widely used control.  It is used to begin, interrupt, or end a particular process.

 

·         Command Button Properties:

 

Appearance       Selects 3-D or flat appearance.

Cancel                 Allows selection of button with Esc key (only one button on a form can have this property True).

Caption               String to be displayed on button.

Default                 Allows selection of button with Enter key (only one button on a form can have this property True).

Font                     Sets font type, style, size.

 

·         Command Button Events:

 

Click                     Event triggered when button is selected either by clicking on it or by pressing the access key.

 

 

Label Boxes

 

·         A label box is a control you use to display text that a user can't edit directly.  We've seen, though, in previous examples, that the text of a label box can be changed at run-time in response to events.

 

·         Label Properties:

 

Alignment           Aligns caption within border.

Appearance       Selects 3-D or flat appearance.

AutoSize             If True, the label is resized to fit the text specifed by the caption property.  If False, the label will remain the size defined at design time and the text may be clipped.

BorderStyle       Determines type of border.

Caption               String to be displayed in box.

Font                     Sets font type, style, size.


WordWrap          Works in conjunction with AutoSize property.  If AutoSize = True, WordWrap = True, then the text will wrap and label will expand vertically to fit the Caption.  If AutoSize = True, WordWrap = False, then the text will not wrap and the label expands horizontally to fit the Caption.  If AutoSize = False, the text will not wrap regardless of WordWrap value.

 

·         Label Events:

 

Click                     Event triggered when user clicks on a label.

DblClick              Event triggered when user double-clicks on a label.

 

 

Text Boxes

 

·         A text box is used to display information entered at design time, by a user at run-time, or assigned within code.  The displayed text may be edited.

 

·         Text Box Properties:

 

Appearance       Selects 3-D or flat appearance.

BorderStyle       Determines type of border.

Font                     Sets font type, style, size.

MaxLength         Limits the length of displayed text (0 value indicates unlimited length).

MultiLine             Specifies whether text box displays single line or multiple lines.

PasswordChar  Hides text with a single character.

ScrollBars          Specifies type of displayed scroll bar(s).

SelLength           Length of selected text (run-time only).

SelStart               Starting position of selected text (run-time only).

SelText                Selected text (run-time only).

Tag                       Stores a string expression.

Text                      Displayed text.

 


·         Text Box Events:

 

Change               Triggered every time the Text property changes.

LostFocus          Triggered when the user leaves the text box.  This is a good place to examine the contents of a text box after editing.

KeyPress            Triggered whenever a key is pressed.  Used for key trapping, as seen in last class.

 

·         Text Box Methods:

 

SetFocus            Places the cursor in a specified text box.

 

Example

 

txtExample.SetFocus ' moves cursor to box named txtExample

 


Example 3-1

 

Password Validation

 

1.    Start a new project.  The idea of this project is to ask the user to input a password.  If correct, a message box appears to validate the user.  If incorrect, other options are provided.

 

2.    Place a two command buttons, a label box, and a text box on your form so it looks something like this:

 

 

3.    Set the properties of the form and each object.

 

Form1:

      BorderStyle               1-Fixed Single

      Caption                      Password Validation

      Name                         frmPassword

 

Label1:

      Alignment                 2-Center

      BorderStyle               1-Fixed Single

      Caption                      Please Enter Your Password:

      FontSize                    10

      FontStyle                   Bold

 

Text1:

      FontSize                    14

      FontStyle                   Regular

      Name                         txtPassword

      PasswordChar         *

      Tag                             [Whatever you choose as a password]

      Text                             [Blank]

 


Command1:

      Caption                      &Validate

      Default                       True

      Name                         cmdValid

 

Command2:

      Cancel                       True

      Caption                      E&xit

      Name                         cmdExit

 

Your form should now look like this:

 

 

4.    Attach the following code to the cmdValid_Click event.

 

Private Sub cmdValid_Click()

'This procedure checks the input password

Dim Response As Integer

If txtPassword.Text = txtPassword.Tag Then

'If correct, display message box

  MsgBox "You've passed security!", vbOKOnly + vbExclamation, "Access Granted"

Else

'If incorrect, give option to try again

  Response = MsgBox("Incorrect password", vbRetryCancel + vbCritical, "Access Denied")

  If Response = vbRetry Then

    txtPassword.SelStart = 0

    txtPassword.SelLength = Len(txtPassword.Text)

  Else

    End

  End If

End If

txtPassword.SetFocus

End Sub


This code checks the input password to see if it matches the stored value.  If so, it prints an acceptance message.  If incorrect, it displays a message box to that effect and asks the user if they want to try again.  If Yes (Retry), another try is granted.  If No (Cancel), the program is ended.  Notice the use of SelLength and SelStart to highlight an incorrect entry.  This allows the user to type right over the incorrect response.

 

5.    Attach the following code to the Form_Activate event.

 

Private Sub Form_Activate()

txtPassword.SetFocus

End Sub

 

6.    Attach the following code to the cmdExit_ Click event.

 

Private Sub cmdExit_Click()

End

End Sub

 

7.    Try running the program.  Try both options:  input correct password (note it is case sensitive) and input incorrect password.  Save your project.

 

If you have time, define a constant, TRYMAX = 3, and modify the code to allow the user to have just TRYMAX attempts to get the correct password.  After the final try, inform the user you are logging him/her off.  You’ll also need a variable that counts the number of tries (make it a Static variable).


Check Boxes

 

·         Check boxes provide a way to make choices from a list of potential candidates.  Some, all, or none of the choices in a group may be selected.

 

·         Check Box Properties:

 

Caption               Identifying text next to box.

Font                     Sets font type, style, size.

Value                   Indicates if unchecked (0, vbUnchecked), checked (1, vbChecked), or grayed out (2, vbGrayed).

 

·         Check Box Events:

 

Click                     Triggered when a box is clicked.  Value property is automatically changed by Visual Basic.

 

 

Option Buttons

 

·         Option buttons provide the capability to make a mutually exclusive choice among a group of potential candidate choices.  Hence, option buttons work as a group, only one of which can have a True (or selected) value.

 

·         Option Button Properties:

 

Caption               Identifying text next to button.

Font                     Sets font type, style, size.

Value                   Indicates if selected (True) or not (False).  Only one option button in a group can be True.  One button in each group of option buttons should always be initialized to True at design time.

 

·         Option Button Events:

 

Click                     Triggered when a button is clicked.  Value property is automatically changed by Visual Basic.

 

 


Arrays

 

·         Up to now, we've only worked with regular variables, each having its own unique name.  Visual Basic has powerful facilities for handling multi-dimensional variables, or arrays.  For now, we'll only use single, fixed-dimension arrays.

 

·         Arrays are declared in a manner identical to that used for regular variables.  For example, to declare an integer array named 'Items', with dimension 9, at the procedure level, we use:

 

Dim Items(9) as Integer

 

If we want the array variables to retain their value upon leaving a procedure, we use the keyword Static:

 

Static Items(9) as Integer

 

At the form or module level, in the general declarations area of the Code window, use:

 

Dim Items(9) as Integer

 

And, at the module level, for a global declaration, use:

 

Global Items(9) as Integer

 

·         The index on an array variable begins at 0 and ends at the dimensioned value.  For example, the Items array in the above examples has ten elements, ranging from Items(0) to Items(9).  You use array variables just like any other variable - just remember to include its name and its index.  For example, to set Item(5) equal to 7, you simply write:

 

            Item(5) = 7

 

 


Control Arrays

 

·         With some controls, it is very useful to define control arrays - it depends on the application.  For example, option buttons are almost always grouped in control arrays.

 

·         Control arrays are a convenient way to handle groups of controls that perform a similar function.  All of the events available to the single control are still available to the array of controls, the only difference being an argument indicating the index of the selected array element is passed to the event.  Hence, instead of writing individual procedures for each control (i.e. not using control arrays), you only have to write one procedure for each array.

 

·         Another advantage to control arrays is that you can add or delete array elements at run-time.  You cannot do that with controls (objects) not in arrays.  Refer to the Load and Unload statements in on-line help for the proper way to add and delete control array elements at run-time.

 

·         Two ways to create a control array:

 

  1. Create an individual control and set desired properties.  Copy the control using the editor, then paste it on the form.  Visual Basic will pop-up a dialog box that will ask you if you wish to create a control array.  Respond yes and the array is created.

 

  1. Create all the controls you wish to have in the array. Assign the desired control array name to the first control.  Then, try to name the second control with the same name.  Visual Basic will prompt you, asking if you want to create a control array.  Answer yes.  Once the array is created, rename all remaining controls with that name.

 

·         Once a control array has been created and named, elements of the array are referred to by their name and index.  For example, to set the Caption property of element 6 of a label box array named lblExample, we would use:

 

lblExample(6).Caption = “This is an example”

 

We'll use control arrays in the next example.

 

 


Frames

 

·         We've seen that both option buttons and check boxes work as a group.  Frames provide a way of grouping related controls on a form.  And, in the case of option buttons, frames affect how such buttons operate. 

 

·         To group controls in a frame, you first draw the frame.  Then, the associated controls must be drawn in the frame.  This allows you to move the frame and controls together.  And, once a control is drawn within a frame, it can be copied and pasted to create a control array within that frame.  To do this, first click on the object you want to copy.  Copy the object.  Then, click on the frame.  Paste the object.  You will be asked if you want to create a control array.  Answer Yes.

·          

·         Drawing the controls outside the frame and dragging them in, copying them into a frame, or drawing the frame around existing controls will not result in a proper grouping.  It is perfectly acceptable to draw frames within other frames.

 

·         As mentioned, frames affect how option buttons work.  Option buttons within a frame work as a group, independently of option buttons in other frames.  Option buttons on the form, and not in frames, work as another independent group.  That is, the form is itself a frame by default. We'll see this in the next example.

 

·         It is important to note that an independent group of option buttons is defined by physical location within frames, not according to naming convention.  That is, a control array of option buttons does not work as an independent group just because it is a control array.  It would only work as a group if it were the only group of option buttons within a frame or on the form.  So, remember physical location, and physical location only, dictates independent operation of option button groups.

 

·         Frame Properties:

 

Caption               Title information at top of frame.

Font                     Sets font type, style, size.

 


Example 3-2

 

Pizza Order

 

1.    Start a new project.  We'll build a form where a pizza order can be entered by simply clicking on check boxes and option buttons.

 

2.    Draw three frames.  In the first, draw three option buttons, in the second, draw two option buttons, and in the third, draw six check boxes.  Draw two option buttons on the form.  Add two command buttons.  Make things look something like this.

 

 

3.    Set the properties of the form and each control.

 

Form1:

      BorderStyle               1-Fixed Single

      Caption                      Pizza Order

      Name                         frmPizza

 

Frame1:

      Caption                      Size

 

Frame2:

      Caption                      Crust Type

 

Frame3

      Caption                      Toppings

 


Option1:

      Caption                      Small

      Name                         optSize

      Value                         True

 

Option2:

      Caption                      Medium

      Name                         optSize (yes, create a control array)

 

Option3:

      Caption                      Large

      Name                         optSize

 

Option4:

      Caption                      Thin Crust

      Name                         optCrust

      Value                         True

 

Option5:

      Caption                      Thick Crust

      Name                         optCrust (yes, create a control array)

 

Option6:

      Caption                      Eat In

      Name                         optWhere

      Value                         True

 

Option7:

      Caption                      Take Out

      Name                         optWhere (yes, create a control array)

 

Check1:

      Caption                      Extra Cheese

      Name                         chkTop

 

Check2:

      Caption                      Mushrooms

      Name                         chkTop (yes, create a control array)

 

Check3:

      Caption                      Black Olives

      Name                         chkTop

 


Check4:

      Caption                      Onions

      Name                         chkTop

 

Check5:

      Caption                      Green Peppers

      Name                         chkTop

 

Check6:

      Caption                      Tomatoes

      Name                         chkTop

 

Command1:

      Caption                      &Build Pizza

      Name                         cmdBuild

 

Command2:

      Caption                      E&xit

      Name                         cmdExit

 

The form should look like this now:

 

 

4.    Declare the following variables in the general declarations area:

 

Option Explicit

Dim PizzaSize As String

Dim PizzaCrust As String

Dim PizzaWhere As String

 

This makes the size, crust, and location variables global to the form.


5.    Attach this code to the Form_Load procedure.  This initializes the pizza size, crust, and eating location.

 

Private Sub Form_Load()

'Initialize pizza parameters

PizzaSize = "Small"

PizzaCrust = "Thin Crust"

PizzaWhere = "Eat In"

End Sub

 

Here, the global variables are initialized to their default values, corresponding to the default option buttons.

 

6.    Attach this code to the three option button array Click events.  Note the use of the Index variable:

 

Private Sub optSize_Click(Index As Integer)

‘Read pizza size

PizzaSize = optSize(Index).Caption

End Sub

 

Private Sub optCrust_Click(Index As Integer)

‘Read crust type

PizzaCrust = optCrust(Index).Caption

End Sub

 

Private Sub optWhere_Click(Index As Integer)

‘Read pizza eating location

PizzaWhere = optWhere(Index).Caption

End Sub

 

In each of these routines, when an option button is clicked, the value of the corresponding button’s caption is loaded into the respective variable.

 


7.    Attach this code to the cmdBuild_Click event.

 

Private Sub cmdBuild_Click()

'This procedure builds a message box that displays your pizza type

Dim Message As String

Dim I As Integer

Message = PizzaWhere + vbCr

Message = Message + PizzaSize + " Pizza" + vbCr

Message = Message + PizzaCrust + vbCr

For I = 0 To 5

  If chkTop(I).Value = vbChecked Then Message = Message + chkTop(I).Caption + vbCr

Next I

MsgBox Message, vbOKOnly, "Your Pizza"

End Sub

 

This code forms the first part of a message for a message box by concatenating the pizza size, crust type, and eating location (vbCr is a symbolic constant representing a ‘carriage return’ that puts each piece of ordering information on a separate line).  Next, the code cycles through the six topping check boxes and adds any checked information to the message.  The code then displays the pizza order in a message box.

 

8.    Attach this code to the cmdExit_Click event.

 

Private Sub cmdExit_Click()

End

End Sub

 

9.    Get the application working.  Notice how the different selection buttons work in their individual groups.  Save your project.

 

10. If you have time, try these modifications:

 

  1. Add a new program button that resets the order form to the initial default values.  You’ll have to reinitialize the three global variables, reset all check boxes to unchecked, and reset all three option button groups to their default values.

 

  1. Modify the code so that if no toppings are selected, the message “Cheese Only” appears on the order form.  You’ll need to figure out a way to see if no check boxes were checked.

List Boxes

 

·         A list box displays a list of items from which the user can select one or more items.  If the number of items exceeds the number that can be displayed, a scroll bar is automatically added.

 

·         List Box Properties:

 

Appearance       Selects 3-D or flat appearance.

List                       Array of items in list box.

ListCount           Number of items in list.

ListIndex             The number of the most recently selected item in list.  If no item is selected, ListIndex = -1.

MultiSelect         Controls how items may be selected (0-no multiple selection allowed, 1-multiple selection allowed, 2-group selection allowed).

Selected              Array with elements set equal to True or False, depending on whether corresponding list item is selected.

Sorted                 True means items are sorted in 'Ascii' order, else items appear in order added.

Text                      Text of most recently selected item.

 

·         List Box Events:

 

Click                     Event triggered when item in list is clicked.

DblClick              Event triggered when item in list is double-clicked.  Primary way used to process selection.

 

·         List Box Methods:

 

AddItem              Allows you to insert item in list.

Clear                    Removes all items from list box.

RemoveItem      Removes item from list box, as identified by index of item to remove.

 

Examples

 

lstExample.AddItem "This is an added item" ' adds text string to list

lstExample.Clear ' clears the list box

lstExample.RemoveItem 4 ' removes lstExample.List(4) from list box


·         Items in a list box are usually initialized in a Form_Load procedure.  It's always a good idea to Clear a list box before initializing it.

 

·         You've seen list boxes before.  In the standard 'Open File' window, the Directory box is a list box with MultiSelect equal to zero.

 

 

Combo Boxes

 

·         The combo box is similar to the list box.  The differences are a combo box includes a text box on top of a list box and only allows selection of one item.  In some cases, the user can type in an alternate response.

 

·         Combo Box Properties:

 

Combo box properties are nearly identical to those of the list box, with the deletion of the MultiSelect property and the addition of a Style property.

 

Appearance         Selects 3-D or flat appearance.

List                         Array of items in list box portion.

ListCount             Number of items in list.

ListIndex              The number of the most recently selected item in list.  If no item is selected, ListIndex = -1.

Sorted                   True means items are sorted in 'Ascii' order, else items appear in order added.

Style                      Selects the combo box form. 

                                Style = 0, Dropdown combo; user can change selection.

                                Style = 1, Simple combo; user can change selection.

                                Style = 2, Dropdown combo; user cannot change selection.

Text                       Text of most recently selected item.

 

·         Combo Box Events:

 

Click                     Event triggered when item in list is clicked.

DblClick              Event triggered when item in list is double-clicked.  Primary way used to process selection.

 


·         Combo Box Methods:

 

AddItem              Allows you to insert item in list.

Clear                    Removes all items from list box.

RemoveItem      Removes item from list box, as identified by index of item to remove.

 

Examples

 

cboExample.AddItem "This is an added item" ' adds text string to list

cboExample.Clear ' clears the combo box

cboExample.RemoveItem 4 ' removes cboExample.List(4) from list box

 

·         You've seen combo boxes before.  In the standard 'Open File' window, the File Name box is a combo box of Style 2, while the Drive box is a combo box of Style 3.

 


Example 3-3

 

Flight Planner

 

1.    Start a new project.  In this example, you select a destination city, a seat location, and a meal preference for airline passengers.

 

2.    Place a list box, two combo boxes, three label boxes and two command buttons on the form.  The form should appear similar to this:

 

 

3.    Set the form and object properties:

 

Form1:

      BorderStyle               1-Fixed Single

      Caption                      Flight Planner

      Name                         frmFlight

 

List1:

      Name                         lstCities

      Sorted                        True

 

Combo1:

      Name                         cboSeat

      Style                           2-Dropdown List

 


Combo2:

      Name                         cboMeal

      Style                           1-Simple

      Text                             [Blank]

 

(After setting properties for this combo box, resize it until it is large enough to hold 4 to 5 entries.)

 

Label1:

      Caption                      Destination City

 

Label2:

      Caption                      Seat Location

 

Label3:

      Caption                      Meal Preference

 

Command1:

      Caption                      &Assign

      Name                         cmdAssign

 

Command2:

      Caption                      E&xit

      Name                         cmdExit

 

Now, the form should look like this:

 

 


4.    Attach this code to the Form_Load procedure:

 

Private Sub Form_Load()

‘Add city names to list box

lstCities.Clear

lstCities.AddItem "San Diego"

lstCities.AddItem "Los Angeles"

lstCities.AddItem "Orange County"

lstCities.AddItem "Ontario"

lstCities.AddItem "Bakersfield"

lstCities.AddItem "Oakland"

lstCities.AddItem "Sacramento"

lstCities.AddItem "San Jose"

lstCities.AddItem "San Francisco"

lstCities.AddItem "Eureka"

lstCities.AddItem "Eugene"

lstCities.AddItem "Portland"

lstCities.AddItem "Spokane"

lstCities.AddItem "Seattle"

lstCities.ListIndex = 0

 

‘Add seat types to first combo box

cboSeat.AddItem "Aisle"

cboSeat.AddItem "Middle"

cboSeat.AddItem "Window"

cboSeat.ListIndex = 0

 

‘Add meal types to second combo box

cboMeal.AddItem "Chicken"

cboMeal.AddItem "Mystery Meat"

cboMeal.AddItem "Kosher"

cboMeal.AddItem "Vegetarian"

cboMeal.AddItem "Fruit Plate"

cboMeal.Text = "No Preference"

End Sub

 

This code simply initializes the list box and the list box portions of the two combo boxes.

 


5.    Attach this code to the cmdAssign_Click event:

 

Private Sub cmdAssign_Click()

‘Build message box that gives your assignment

Dim Message As String

Message = "Destination: " + lstCities.Text + vbCr

Message = Message + "Seat Location: " + cboSeat.Text + vbCr

Message = Message + "Meal: " + cboMeal.Text + vbCr

MsgBox Message, vbOKOnly + vbInformation, "Your Assignment"

End Sub

 

When the Assign button is clicked, this code forms a message box message by concatenating the selected city (from the list box lstCities), seat choice (from cboSeat), and the meal preference (from cboMeal).

 

6.    Attach this code to the cmdExit_Click event:

 

Private Sub cmdExit_Click()

End

End Sub

 

7.    Run the application.  Save the project.

 

 


Exercise 3

 

Customer Database Input Screen

 

A new sports store wants you to develop an input screen for its customer database.  The required input information is:

 

1.   Name

2.   Age

3.   City of Residence

4.   Sex (Male or Female)

5.   Activities (Running, Walking, Biking, Swimming, Skiing and/or In-Line Skating)

6.   Athletic Level (Extreme, Advanced, Intermediate, or Beginner)

 

Set up the screen so that only the Name and Age (use text boxes) and, perhaps, City (use a combo box) need to be typed; all other inputs should be set with check boxes and option buttons.  When a screen of information is complete, display the summarized profile in a message box.  This profile message box should resemble this:

 

 

 


My Solution:

 

Form:

 















 

 


cmdNew

 

cmdShow

 

cboCity

 

Label1

 

optSex

 

Frame1

 










Frame2

 




optLevel

 




cmdExit

 



 

 

 


Properties:

 

Form frmCustomer:

            BorderStyle = 1 - Fixed Single

            Caption = Customer Profile

 

CommandButton cmdExit:

            Caption = E&xit

 

Frame Frame3:

            Caption = City of Residence

            FontName = MS Sans Serif

            FontBold = True

            FontSize = 9.75

            FontItalic = True

 

ComboBox cboCity:

            Sorted = True

            Style = 1 - Simple Combo


CommandButton cmdNew:

            Caption = &New Profile

 

CommandButton cmdShow:

            Caption = &Show Profile

 

Frame Frame4:

            Caption = Athletic Level

            FontName = MS Sans Serif

            FontBold = True

            FontSize = 9.75

            FontItalic = True

 

OptionButton optLevel:

            Caption = Beginner

            Index = 3

 

OptionButton optLevel:

            Caption = Intermediate

            Index = 2

            Value = True

 

OptionButton optLevel:

            Caption = Advanced

            Index = 1

 

OptionButton optLevel:

            Caption = Extreme

            Index = 0

 

Frame Frame1:

            Caption = Sex

            FontName = MS Sans Serif

            FontBold = True

            FontSize = 9.75

            FontItalic = True

 

OptionButton optSex:

            Caption =   Female

            Index = 1

 

OptionButton optSex:

            Caption = Male

            Index = 0

            Value = True


Frame Frame2:

            Caption = Activities

            FontName = MS Sans Serif

            FontBold = True

            FontSize = 9.75

            FontItalic = True

 

CheckBox chkAct:

            Caption = In-Line Skating

            Index = 5

 

CheckBox chkAct:

            Caption = Skiing

            Index = 4

 

CheckBox chkAct:

            Caption = Swimming

            Index = 3

 

CheckBox chkAct:

            Caption = Biking

            Index = 2

 

CheckBox chkAct:

            Caption = Walking

            Index = 1

 

CheckBox chkAct:

            Caption = Running

            Index = 0

 

TextBox txtName:

            FontName = MS Sans Serif

            FontSize = 12

 

Label Label1:

            Caption = Name

            FontName = MS Sans Serif

            FontBold = True

            FontSize = 9.75

            FontItalic = True

 

TextBox txtAge:

            FontName = MS Sans Serif

            FontSize = 12


Label Label2:

            Caption = Age

            FontName = MS Sans Serif

            FontBold = True

            FontSize = 9.75

            FontItalic = True

 

 

Code:

 

General Declarations:

 

Option Explicit

Dim Activity As String

 

 

cmdExit Click Event:

 

Private Sub cmdExit_Click()

End

End Sub

 

 

cmdNew Click Event:

 

Private Sub cmdNew_Click()

'Blank out name and reset check boxes

Dim I As Integer

txtName.Text = ""

txtAge.Text = ""

For I = 0 To 5

  chkAct(I).Value = vbUnchecked

Next I

End Sub

 

 

cmdShow Click Event:

 

Private Sub cmdShow_Click()

Dim NoAct As Integer, I As Integer

Dim Msg As String, Pronoun As String

 

'Check to make sure name entered

If txtName.Text = "" Then

  MsgBox "The profile requires a name.", vbOKOnly + vbCritical, "No Name Entered"

  Exit Sub

End If

 

'Check to make sure age entered

If txtAge.Text = "" Then

  MsgBox "The profile requires an age.", vbOKOnly + vbCritical, "No Age Entered"

  Exit Sub

End If

 

'Put together customer profile message

Msg = txtName.Text + " is" + Str$(txtAge.Text) + " years old." + vbCr

If optSex(0).Value = True Then Pronoun = "He " Else Pronoun = "She "

Msg = Msg + Pronoun + "lives in " + cboCity.Text + "." + vbCr

Msg = Msg + Pronoun + "is a"

If optLevel(3).Value = False Then Msg = Msg + "n " Else Msg = Msg + " "

Msg = Msg + Activity + " level athlete." + vbCr

NoAct = 0

For I = 0 To 5

  If chkAct(I).Value = vbChecked Then NoAct = NoAct + 1

Next I

If NoAct > 0 Then

  Msg = Msg + "Activities include:" + vbCr

  For I = 0 To 5

    If chkAct(I).Value = vbChecked Then Msg = Msg + String$(10, 32) + chkAct(I).Caption + vbCr

  Next I

Else

  Msg = Msg + vbCr

End If

MsgBox Msg, vbOKOnly, "Customer Profile"

End Sub

 

 

Form Load Event:

 

Private Sub Form_Load()

'Load combo box with potential city names

cboCity.AddItem "Seattle"

cboCity.Text = "Seattle"

cboCity.AddItem "Bellevue"

cboCity.AddItem "Kirkland"

cboCity.AddItem "Everett"

cboCity.AddItem "Mercer Island"

cboCity.AddItem "Renton"

cboCity.AddItem "Issaquah"

cboCity.AddItem "Kent"

cboCity.AddItem "Bothell"

cboCity.AddItem "Tukwila"

cboCity.AddItem "West Seattle"

cboCity.AddItem "Edmonds"

cboCity.AddItem "Tacoma"

cboCity.AddItem "Federal Way"

cboCity.AddItem "Burien"

cboCity.AddItem "SeaTac"

cboCity.AddItem "Woodinville"

Activity = "intermediate"

End Sub

 

 

optLevel Click Event:

 

Private Sub optLevel_Click(Index As Integer)

‘Determine activity level

Select Case Index

Case 0

   Activity = "extreme"

Case 1

  Activity = "advanced"

Case 2

  Activity = "intermediate"

Case 3

  Activity = "beginner"

End Select

End Sub

 

 

txtAge KeyPress Event:

 

Private Sub txtAge_KeyPress(KeyAscii As Integer)

'Only allow numbers for age

If (KeyAscii >= vbKey0 And KeyAscii <= vbKey9) Or KeyAscii = vbKeyBack Then

  Exit Sub

Else

  KeyAscii = 0

End If

End Sub


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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