Unit Calendar

For our combined Teaching Tolerance Unit, each teacher will use technology to film themselves teaching their one-hour lesson in their respective classrooms. Each teacher will upload the video to a YouTube shared, private channel and assign their students to watch the video for homework in preparation for the following days. This ensures all students have access to the multiple subject areas for higher-level thinking and learning, holistic integration of students' education (not just single focus/silos), and deeper understanding of how prejudice and the ability to teach tolerance runs across all subjects. On the fifth day, we will co-teach a planning session and on the ninth day will we co-teaching the culminating Flash Mob lesson where students take creative action to end prejudice and teach tolerance to our school, community, and the world.



BIOLOGY
 Day 1 - What Darwin Didn't Know video Day 2 - Chapter 15: Genetics, Punnett Square and Beyond

 Day 3 - Naked Bunny Lab

Content Standards: Evolution 8a. Students know how natural selection determines the differential survival of groups of organisms.  CA ELD Standards: Identify media messages, Cluster 2, Level I: Identify a variety of media messages (e.g. radio, television, movies) and give some details supporting the messages.

Learning Objectives: 

After introducing Darwin's theory of evolution in a video presentation, SWBAT describe the step-by-step account by which Darwin's observations during his voyage on the H.M.S. Beagle led him to the mechanism of evolution, natural selection.

Student Activity: 

Anticipatory set/Into - Students will answer four questions on Darwin for the warm up activity. (5 min) 

Instruction/Through - Students will watch a video on Darwin's life and take notes on the graphic organizer. (40 min)

Closure - Students will review the information on the graphic organizer. (10 min) 

Assessment:

Diagnostic/Entry level - Teacher will review the warm up questions and informally check for student understanding.

Formative/Progress monitoring - Teacher will informally check for student understanding while watching the video by repeating important ideas as they are conveyed on the video. 

Summative - Teacher will formally assess the Darwin graphic organizer for completeness and correctness.


 

Content Standards: Genetics 3a. Students know how to predict the probable outcome of phenotypes in a genetic cross from the genotypes of the parents and mode of inheritance.  CA ELD standards: Cluster 5, level I: Participate in social conversations with peers and adults on familiar topics by asking and answering questions and soliciting information.

Learning Objectives: 
After viewing the video on heredity, SWBAT learn more about Punnett squares and predicting traits.  After watching the teacher demonstrate how to predict traits by using the Punnett square method, SWBAT independently predict the phenotypic outcome of crossing parental alleles.  After listening to the discussion about skin color and prejudice, SWBAT see the injustice in discrimination based on skin color and feel compassion for those who have been discriminated against.  After being asked to Think-Pair-Share with their neighbor, SWBAT participate in social conversations with peers and adults on familiar topics by asking and answering questions and soliciting information.

Student Activity:  
Anticipatory set/Into - Students watch a 10 min. video on heredity.  Students use the information provided in the video and talk about what heredity is in a class discussion. (13 min.)
Instruction/Through - Students will listen to the Powerpoint presentation about heredity, genetics, probability and Punnett squares and take Cornell-style notes on the information provided. (10 min.)
Guided practice/Through - Students will watch the teacher demonstrate how to predict genetic combinations by Punnett square crosses.  (5 min.)
Independent practice/Through - Students receive a Punnett square practice worksheet and practice predicting phenotypes of allele crosses.  (10 min.)
Closure - Students listen to a discussion about polygenic traits and skin color.  Students Think-Pair-Share with their neighbor about how prejudice based on skin color is a form of racism and social injustice. (15 min.)
Beyond - Students take the practice worksheet home for homework if they did not finish it during class.  (2 min.)

Assessment:
Diagnostic/Entry level - Teacher will informally check on students' preliminary knowledge of heredity and the genetics involved.
Formative-Progress monitoring - Teacher informally checks for understanding while walking around the classroom while students are working on the Punnett square practice worksheet.  Teacher will orally ask students questions about crosses and predictions.
Summative - Teacher will formally assess Punnett square practice worksheet based on completeness and correctness.
Content Standards: Evolution 7a. Students know why natural selection acts on the phenotype rather than the genotype of an organism.  7b. Students know why alleles that are lethal in a homozygous individual may be carried in a heterozygote and thus maintained in a gene pool. CA ELD Standards: Listening and Speaking, Cluster 3, Level I: Make oneself be understood when speaking by using consistent standard English grammatical forms and sounds. 

Learning Objectives:
After participating in the Naked Bunny Lab, SWBAT understand that an organism with a phenotype that does not aid in it's survival (homozygous recessive), that species will eventually die off and become extinct while the species with homozygous dominant or  heterozygous alleles will survive and maintain their gene pool.  After plotting the data on a graph, SWBAT proficiently create a line graph with Title, axis labels, legend and data.

Student Activity:
Anticipatory set/Into - Students will answer four questions about survival of the fittest and allele frequency.
Instruction/Through - Students will listen to the instructions for the Naked Bunny lab including how to pick the beans that represent alleles, how to calculate allelic frequency and how to create a line graph.
Guided practice/Through - Students will watch the teacher model making a line graph.
Independent practice/Through - Students will randomly pick two beans out of the bag and organize the beans according to colored pairs. Students will remove the naked fur alleles (homozygous white) and calculate allele frequency.  Students will log the data into the table and repeat the process 5 times.  Students will plot the data into a line graph. Students will answer the analysis and conclusion questions.
Closure - Students will Think-Pair-Share with their neighbors what they think would happen if the habitat changed to benefit the naked fur bunny.

Assessment:
Diagnostic/Entry level - Teacher will review the warm up questions and informally check for student understanding.
Formative/Progress monitoring - Teacher will walk around the classroom and ask students questions about allelic frequency.
Summative - Teacher will formally assess the Naked Bunny Lab for completeness and correctness.


 Day 4 - Adapt-an-Organism Day 5 - Joint Biology, English, & Math class
Planning and Organization
 Day 6 - Chapters 16: Evolution of Populations
Content Standards: Evolution 8b. Students know a great diversity of species increases the chance that at least some organisms survive major changes in the environment. CA ELD standards: Writing conventions Cluster 1ES, Level I: Use sentences with consistent variations in grammatical form.

Learning Objectives:  
After describing the unique features of the organism and habitat including descriptions of body parts for eating, movement, food source, living environment, SWBAT understand that organisms that have traits and habitats that give them an advantage will survive and reproduce.  After giving their uniquely adapted organism features for survival, SWBAT create a sketch or drawing of the organism with each adaptation, the habitat, and food source, each with a small description.  

Student Activity:
Anticipatory set/Into - Students will answer four questions about adaptation. (5 min)
Instruction/Through - Students will listen to the instruction for completing the Adapt-an-Organism activity. (5 min)
Guided Practice/Through - Students will watch teacher create an organism with all of the required components on the whiteboard as an example. (5 min)
Independent practice/Through - Students will create, describe and sketch their unique organism. (35 min)
Closure - Students Think-Pair-Share with their neighbors about adaptation and how their organism adapted to the environment. (5 min)

Assessment:
Diagnostic/Entry level - Teachers will review the warm up questions and informally check for understanding.
Formative/Progress monitoring - Teacher will walk around the classroom while the students create their organism.  Teacher will informally ask students questions about their creations and how they adapt to the habitat.
Summative - Teacher will formally assess the Adapt-an-organism activity.

Content Standards: 1.2 Memorize and perform works of dance, demonstrating technical accuracy and consistent artistic intent. Creating, Performing, and Participating in Dance Creation/Invention of Dance Movement: 2.1 Create a diverse body of works of dance, each of which demonstrates originality, unity, clarity of intent, and a dynamic range of movement.  CA ELD standards: Listening and Speaking, Cluster 5, Level 1: Participate in social conversation with peers and adults on familiar topics by asking and answering questions and soliciting information.

Learning Objectives:  
After viewing the video on the Do-Re-Mi flash mob at Antwerp train station, students will be inspired by the video and want to learn more about the Flash Mob Unity Project.  After listening to the teachers from English, Biology and Math explain the intent, purpose and how-tos of the Flash Mob Unity Project, SWBAT get organized into groups based on tasks/responsibilities, elect a director for each group and communicate with their teammates about details for implementing the project.  After listening to the discussion about using a flash mob to communicate a message to the public, SWBAT feel excited and motivated about the project and look forward to the performance.  After getting into groups based on flash mob tasks, SWBAT participate in social conversation with peers and adults on familiar topics by asking and answering questions and soliciting information.

Student Activity:
Anticipatory Set/Into - Students watch video examples of flash mob events. (5 min) 
Instruction/Through - Students listen to co-teachers explain what components are required for a flash mob event including costumes, dance and music. (5 min)
Guided practice/Through - Students choose a group based on interest. Students meet with their groups and elect directors. Students communicate their ideas for implementing the project. (10 min)
Independent practice/Through - Students plan and organize tasks with teammates. (30 min)
Closure - Students take into consideration the two-week planning period and communicate with their teammates about how to stay organized and connected. (2 min) 
Beyond - Students sign up for groups and individual tasks.  Students will video tape their flashmob performance and share their video on social media sites. (3 min)

Assessment:
Diagnostic/Entry level - Co-teachers will informally check on students' preliminary knowledge of flash mobs after watching the videos, through informal discussions.
Formative/Progress monitoring - Co-teachers informally check for understanding while walking around the room while students are working together in their groups.
Summative - Students will be formally assessed based on participating in the planning, set-up and final performance.
Summative - Students will be formally assessed on the final video product
Summative - Students will be formally assessed on their on their one-page written reflection about the experience.
Content Standards: Evolution 8c. Students know the effects of genetic drift on the diversity of organisms in a population. 8d. Students know reproductive or geographic isolation affect speciation. CA ELD standards: Listening and Speaking Cluster 8, Level I: Identify the main idea and some supporting details of oral presentations, familiar literature, and key concepts of subject-matter content.

Learning Objectives:
After listening to the Powerpoint presentation on Chapter 16, SWBAT understand the effects of genetic drift on the diversity of organisms in a population.  After listening to the Powerpoint presentation on Chapter 16, SWBAT understand that the relative frequency of an allele is the number of times the allele occurs in the gene pool. After listening to the Powerpoint presentation on Chapter 16, SWBAT connect the meaning of polygenic traits with many possible genotypes and phenotypes, such as skin color.

Student Activity:
Anticipatory set/Into - Students will watch a short video about directional, stabilizing and disruptive selection. (5 min)
Instruction/Through - Students will listen to a Powerpoint presentation on Chapter 16 and take Cornell-style notes while identifying the main idea and some supporting details and key concepts of subject-matter content. (20 min)
Independent practice/Through - Students will complete Chapter 16-1 worksheet. (20 min)
Closure - Students will be quizzed through oral questioning about the content that they learned today. (10 min)

Assessment:
Diagnostic/Entry level - Teacher will informally check for understanding after the students watch the video.
Formative/Progress monitoring - Teacher will informally ask students questions while providing information through the Powerpoint presentation.
Formative/Progress monitoring - Teacher will walk around the classroom and informally check for understanding while students are completing their worksheet.
Summative - Teacher will formally assess the Chapter 16-1 worksheet based on completeness and correctness.


 Day 7 - Modeling Adaptation activity
Hunter/Seeder/Fisher
 Day 8 Chapter 15/16 test on Darwin's Theory of Evolution & Evolution of Populations Day 9 - Joint Biology, English & Math Session
Culminating Event - Flash Mob Performance at Oceanside Sunset Market
Content Standards: Evolution 7a. Students know why natural selection acts on the phenotype rather than the genotype of an organism. 7d. Students know variation within a species increases the likelihood that at least some members of a species will survive under changed environmental conditions.  CA ELD standards: Listening & Speaking Cluster 5, Level I: Participate in social conversations with peers and adults on familiar topics by asking and answering questions and soliciting information.

Learning Objectives: 
After getting into groups of three, SWBAT determine which person will be the hunter, fisher and seeder.  After flipping a coin to determine habitat conditions, SWBAT calculate the energy points for survival of each species.  After recording the score and habitat for each species, SWBAT predict what would happen if the conditions for each species were reversed. After answering the analysis and conclusion questions, SWBAT know that habitat conditions play an important role in a species fitness and survival.

Student Activity:
Anticipatory set/Into - Students will listen to the instructions for the Modeling Adaptation activity and receive a worksheet for the activity.
Instruction/Through - Students will watch the teacher model the coin flip and scoring procedure. (5 min)
Guided practice//Through - Students will get into groups of three and decide who will be the hunter, fisher and seeder species. (5 min)
Independent practice/Through - Students will flip the coin three times to determine climate, living area, and food availability. Students will calculate energy points from the table provided.  Students will determine which species survived in the habitat.  Students will predict the outcome if the conditions were reversed.  Students will answer the analysis and conclusion questions. (40 min)
Closure - Students will participate in the group discussion and share with the class their conclusions about habitat and survival of species. (5 min)

Assessment:
Diagnostic/Entry level - Teacher will informally check for understanding after explaining the instructions for the Modeling Adaptation activity.
Formative/Progress monitoring - Teacher will walk around the classroom and informally assess whether students understand what they are doing and the concepts that are connected to the activity.
Summative - Teacher will formally assess the Modeling Adaptation worksheet for correctness and completeness.
Content Standards: Genetics 3a. Students know how to predict the probable outcome of phenotypes in a genetic cross from the genotypes of the parents and mode of inheritance.  Evolution 7a. Students know why natural selection acts on the phenotype rather than the genotype of an organism.  7b. Students know why alleles that are lethal in a homozygous individual may be carried in a heterozygote and thus maintained in a gene pool.  8a. Students know how natural selection determines the differential survival of groups of organisms. 8b. Students know a great diversity of species increases a chance that at least some organisms survive major changes in the environment. 8c. Students know the effects of genetic drift on the diversity of organisms in a population.  8d. Students know reproductive or geographic isolation affect speciation.  CA ELD standards: Literary Response & Analysis, Cluster 2, Level I: Apply knowledge of language to analyze and derive meaning from literary texts and comprehend them.

Learning Objectives: 
After listening to the instructions for taking the test and receiving the test material, SWBAT read the test questions and write the answer on the answer sheet.

Student Activity:
Anticipatory Set/Into - Students will listen to the teacher give instructions for completing the student information on the answer sheet, they will write their name, period and date on the answer sheet.
Independent practice/Through - Students will open the test questions and write the answer on the answer sheet.
Closure - Students who finish the test before the period ends will start completing the questions to the 16-3 worksheet with the aid of the textbook.

Assessment:
Diagnostic/Entry level - Teacher will informally check for understanding after giving directions for filling the answer sheet with name, period and date.
Formative/Progress monitoring - Teacher will walk around the classroom and informally assess whether students are doing their own work and staying on task.
Summative - Teacher will assess the Chapter 15/16 test for completeness and correctness.
Content Standards: Creation/Invention of Dance Movement 2.1 Create a divers body of works of dance, each of which demonstrates originality, unity, clarity of intent, and a dynamic range of movement. 2.4 Perform a diverse range of works by various dance artists, maintaining integrity of the work while applying personal artistic expression.  2.5 Collaborate with peers in the development of complex choreography in diverse groupings. CA ELD standards: Listening and Speaking, Cluster 3, Level I: Make oneself be understood when speaking by using consistent standard English grammatical forms and sounds.

Learning Objectives: 
After practicing the choreography for the flash mob performance, SWBAT successfully perform the unity dance in front of a large group of people in a public place.  After working with their teams and participating by contributing ideas, creating props and working in unity, SWBAT create and organize a large collaborative project that has the specific goal of communicating the idea of unity and tolerance to the public.

Student Activity:
Anticipatory Set/Into - Students will listen to the co-teachers give instructions for preparing for the performance.
Instruction/Through - Co-teachers and directors will guide their teammates to complete the necessary tasks and responsibilities required of their group for the performance.
Independent practice/Through - Students will gather at the Oceanside Sunset market and perform their flash mob unity dance to the spectators in the area.
Closure - Students will take a bow and quickly disperse into the crowd.
Beyond - Students will meet at the designated area after the performance and celebrate their accomplishment with some refreshments.

Assessment:
Diagnostic/Entry level - Co-teachers will informally assess student participation and collaboration during set up, flash mob performance and break down/clean up of event.

Formative/Progress monitoring - Teachers informally work with students to make sure the content of the communication is accurate and based on the co-teaching lessons, that students are using positive communication, that all members are fulfilling a role.

Summative - Co-teachers will assess students' flash mob performance based on a collaborative effort, participation and performance.


ENGLISH

 Day 1
            Day 2           
 Day 3
Content Standards:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
ELD Cluster 2
Use Social and Academic Vocabulary
Advanced level
Apply knowledge of academic and social vocabulary to achieve independent reading.

Learning Objectives:
After reviewing the vocabulary of prejudice, taking a prejudice survey, taking the skin tone survey, and reading the "First They Came" quote, students will write a reflection including (K-W-L) what they already know, didn't know, and want to learn more about.

Student Activity:
1. Vocabulary of prejudice
2. Prejudice Survey
3. Teaching Tolerance Skin Tone Survey
4. Discussion about "First They Came"
“First they came for the Socialist, and I did not speak out because I was not a Socialist.  Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out because I was not a Trade Unionist.  Then they can for the Jews, and I did not speak out because I was not a Jew.  Then they came for me, and there was no one left to speak for me.” – Pastor Martin Niemoller
5. Written reflection including (K-W-L)
Assessment:
1. Students' participation in the Flyswatter Game vocabulary review (swat the prejudice).
2. Students' prejudice survey responses
3. Students'
Teaching Tolerance skin tone survey responses
4. Students' participation and expression regarding "First They Came"
5. Students' written reflection including (K-W-L)
Content Standards:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
ELD Cluster 2
Use Social and Academic Vocabulary
Advanced level
Apply knowledge of academic and social vocabulary to achieve independent reading.

Learning Objectives:
After students collaborate in groups to read separate primary and secondary sources about a culture that experienced or is experiencing genocide or prejudice,  each student creates an "advertisement" to communicate and persuade the students to take an action against the injustice. Students rotate and "teach" each other the issues for each culture (similar to jigsaw, but with an "advertisement" and linear or circular rotation amongst group members).

Student Activity:
1. In groups, read each group member reads a different historical and current article regarding genocide and injustice represented from several countries throughout the world (including Native Americans and The Holocaust).
2. Students create an inside/outside circle (or straight-line if pressed for time or to complete in the classroom) "advertisement" persuading classmates to take action against different genocides (past and current) in diverse cultures throughout time.
Assessment:
1. Students' ability to pull relevant information from primary and secondary sources.
2. Students' ability to create and communicate their persuasive "advertisement" regarding the genocide or prejudice they researched to their fellow classmates.
3. Students' ability to work together, listen, speak,


Content Standards:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.
ELD Cluster 2ES
Analyze Text Features
Advanced level
Analyze the features and rhetorical devices of different types of public documents and the way authors use those features and devices.

Learning Objectives: After reading Night  chapters one and two, students create a reading journal with evidence (including page number) and analysis/reflection to support their examples of diction, syntax, tone, imagery the author uses to persuade the reader. Students represent the information learned in a creative work that is separate or combined from chapter to chapter. 

Student Activity:
1. Read Night  chapters one and two.
2. Writing in a reading journal and create reading response for chapters one and two.
Assessment:
1. Students' reading responses--a creative work that expresses the tone, diction, and syntax the author uses to convey the theme of the novel and persuade his readers. Students consider creating: press release, news article, graphic cells, storyboard, creative writing story, game, picture, poem--one creative piece that corresponds to the reading of the first two chapters.
2. Students' reading journal with several entries reflections, and reactions to the text.
 Day 4
Day 5 Co-Taught Biology, English, and Math class - Planning and Organization Day 6
Content Standards:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

Learning Objectives:
After reading Night  chapters one and two, students create a reading journal with evidence (including page number) and analysis/reflection to support their examples of diction, syntax, tone, imagery the author uses to persuade the reader. Students represent the information learned in a creative work that is separate or combined from chapter to chapter. 

Student Activity:
1. Discuss chapters one and two.
2. Write in a reading journal and create reading response for chapters one and two.
3. Read Night  chapters three and four.

Assessment:
1. Students' participation in the discussion.
2. Students' reading responses--a creative work that expresses the tone, diction, and syntax the author uses to convey the theme of the novel and persuade his readers. Students consider creating: press release, news article, graphic cells, storyboard, creative writing story, game, picture, poem--one creative piece that corresponds to the reading of the first two chapters.
3. Students' reading journal with several entries reflections, and reactions to the text.
                                         

Content Standards:
1.2 Memorize and perform works of dance, demonstrating technical accuracy and consistent artistic intent.  Creating, Performing, and Participating in Dance Creation/Invention of Dance Movement: 2.1 Create a diverse body of works of dance, each of which demonstrates originality, unity, clarity of intent, and a dynamic range of movement.  CA ELD Standards: Listening and Speaking: Cluster 5, level I - Participate in social conversations with peers and adults on familiar topics by asking and answering questions and soliciting information.

Learning Objectives:
After viewing the video the video on the Do-Re-Mi flash mob at Antwerp train station, students will be inspired by the video and want to learn more about the Flash Mob Unity Project.  After listening to the teachers from English, Biology and Math explain the intent, purpose and how-to of the Flash Mob Unity Project, SWBAT get organized into groups based on tasks/responsibilities, elect a director for each group and communicate with their teammates about details for implementing the project.  After listening to the discussion about using a flash mob to communicate a message to the public, SWBAT feel excited and motivated about the project and look forward to the performance.  After getting into groups based on flash mob tasks, SWBAT participate in social conversation with peers and adults on familiar topics by asking and answering questions and soliciting information.

Student Activity:
Anticipatory set/Into - Students watch video examples of flash mob events.
Instruction/Through - Students listen to co-teachers explain what components are required for a flash mob event including costumes, dance and music.
Guided practice/Through - Students choose a group based on interest.  Students meet with their groups and elect directors.  Students communicate their ideas for implementing the project.
Independent practice/Through - Students plan and organize tasks with teammates.
Closure - Students take into consideration the two-week planning period and communicate with their teammates about how to stay organized and connected.
Beyond - Students sign up for groups and individual tasks.  Students will videotape their flash mob performance and share their video on social media.

Assessment:
Diagnostic/Entry level - Co-teachers will informally check on students' preliminary knowledge of flash mobs after watching the videos, through informal discussions.
Formative/Progress monitoring - Co-teachers informally check for understanding while walking around the room while students are working together in their groups.
Summative - Co-teachers will formally assess students based on participation in the planning, set-up and final performance.
Summative - Students will be assessed on the final video product.
Summative - Students will be assessed on the their one-page written reflection about the experience. 
Content Standards:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

Learning Objectives:
After reading Night  chapters three and four, students continue in their reading journals with evidence (including page number) and analysis/reflection to support their examples of diction, syntax, tone, imagery the author uses to persuade the reader. Students represent the information learned in a creative work that is separate or combined from chapter to chapter. 

Student Activity:
1. Discuss chapters three and four
2. Write in a reading journal and create reading response for chapters three and four.
3. Read Night  chapters five, six, and seven.

Assessment:
1. Students' participation in the discussion.
2. Students' reading responses--a creative work that expresses the tone, diction, and syntax the author uses to convey the theme of the novel and persuade his readers. Students consider creating: press release, news article, graphic cells, storyboard, creative writing story, game, picture, poem--one creative piece that corresponds to the reading of the first two chapters.
3. Students' reading journal with several entries reflections, and reactions to the text.


 Day 7
 Day 8
Day 9 Co-Taught Biology, English, and Math class - Culminating Event: Performance
Content Standards:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

ELD Cluster 2ES
Analyze Text Features
Advanced level
Analyze the features and rhetorical devices of different types of public documents and the way authors use those features and devices.
Learning Objectives
:

After reading Night  chapters five, six, and seven,  students continue in their reading journals with evidence (including page number) and analysis/reflection to support their examples of diction, syntax, tone, imagery the author uses to persuade the reader. Students represent the information learned in a creative work that is separate or combined from chapter to chapter. 

Student Activity:
1. Discuss chapters five, six, and seven.
2. Write in a reading journal and create reading response for chapters five, six, and seven.

Assessment:
1. Students' participation in the discussion.
2. Students' reading responses--a creative work that expresses the tone, diction, and syntax the author uses to convey the theme of the novel and persuade his readers. Students consider creating: press release, news article, graphic cells, storyboard, creative writing story, game, picture, poem--one creative piece that corresponds to the reading of the first two chapters.
3. Students' reading journal with several entries reflections, and reactions to the text.
Content Standards:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.9 Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
ELD Cluster 2ES
Analyze Text Features
Advanced level
Analyze the features and rhetorical devices of different types of public documents and the way authors use those features and devices.
Learning Objectives: After students finish the text, and before writing their persuasive essays, students share and appreciate their creative representations for each chapter with the rest of the class, watch a movie to reinforce the learning and ideas about genocide and prejudice, and turn in their journals.

Student Activity
:

1. Gallery walk for each student's creative expressions. Write one idea, thought, or word from each person's work that particularly resonates.
2. Creative consciousness "share out" with the whole class reading off their idea, intermittently, randomly, as inspired.
3. Watch "One Survivor Remembers" Holocaust video from a teenage girl's perspective (or other related video) and reflect on similarities to and differences from Night.
4. Students turn in journals.

Assessment:
1. Students' ability to communicate the author's tone, theme, and persuasion in a creative work.
2. Students' participation and reaction to other students' creative works.
3. Students' reflection on the text and the movie.
4. Student's journals



Content Standards: Creation/Invention of Dance Movement 2.1 Create a divers body of works of dance, each of which demonstrates originality, unity, clarity of intent, and a dynamic range of movement. 2.4 Perform a diverse range of works by various dance artists, maintaining integrity of the work while applying personal artistic expression.  2.5 Collaborate with peers in the development of complex choreography in diverse groupings. CA ELD standards: Listening and Speaking, Cluster 3, Level I: Make oneself be understood when speaking by using consistent standard English grammatical forms and sounds.

Learning Objectives: 
After practicing the choreography for the flash mob performance, SWBAT successfully perform the unity dance in front of a large group of people in a public place.  After working with their teams and participating by contributing ideas, creating props and working in unity, SWBAT create and organize a large collaborative project that has the specific goal of communicating the idea of unity and tolerance to the public.

Student Activity:
Anticipatory Set/Into - Students will listen to the co-teachers give instructions for preparing for the performance.
Instruction/Through - Co-teachers and directors will guide their teammates to complete the necessary tasks and responsibilities required of their group for the performance.
Independent practice/Through - Students will gather at the Oceanside Sunset market and perform their flash mob unity dance to the spectators in the area.
Closure - Students will take a bow and quickly disperse into the crowd.
Beyond - Students will meet at the designated area after the performance and celebrate their accomplishment with some refreshments.

Assessment:
Diagnostic/Entry level - Co-teachers will informally assess student participation and collaboration during set up, flash mob performance and break down/clean up of event.

Formative/Progress monitoring - Teachers informally work with students to make sure the content of the communication is accurate and based on the co-teaching lessons, that students are using positive communication, that all members are fulfilling a role.

Summative - Co-teachers will assess students' flash mob performance based on a collaborative effort, participation and performance.

GEOMETRY


 Day 1
 Day 2
 Day 3
Content Standards: CCSS.Math.Content.HSG-SRT.B.4 Prove theorems about triangles. Theorems include: a line parallel to one side of a triangle divides the other two proportionally, and conversely; the Pythagorean Theorem proved using triangle similarity.

Learning ObjectivesStudents will recognize the contributions mathematicians across the globe, male and female, have made to the field of mathematics.  Students will understand new mathematical theorems developed globally and be able to describe them to others.


Student Activity:  Students will start by reviewing the Pythagorean Theorem from the previous unit.  Before heading to the computer lab with the students, the teacher will introduce the two day research project entitled "Mathematicians of the World Unite!"  Students will get into groups and choose three theorems/proofs.  One  from the following list:  a line parallel to one side of a triangle divides the other two proportionally, and conversely; the Pythagorean Theorem proved using triangle similarity.   Another theorem will be from a mathematician who is either a female.  And finally one from a specific region of the world.  Regions include:  South/Central America, Middle East, Eastern Europe, Africa, Asia, and Pacific Islander.  Each group will be responsible for creating a Bio for each mathematician and the theorem they developed.  Students will be able to upload their work onto a mind map as a class.

Assessment:  Students will have identified one theorem from each category and the corresponding mathematician
Content StandardsCCSS.Math.Content.HSG-SRT.B.4 Prove theorems about triangles. Theorems include: a line parallel to one side of a triangle divides the other two proportionally, and conversely; the Pythagorean Theorem proved using triangle similarity.

Learning Objectives:  Students will recognize the contributions mathematicians across the globe, male and female, have made to the field of mathematics.  Students will understand new mathematical theorems developed globally and be able to describe them to others.

Student Activity:  In continuing the previous day's project, the students will have an opportunity to finish any research they need to do as a group in the library.  From here the students will need to begin creating their digital Bios of their mathematicians.  The students will spend this time editing the mind map that will display the mathematicians on a map of the globe.  Position on the map will reflect the origins of the mathematician they have discovered.  Finally as a group the students will reflect on what were their assumptions going into the project, what they discovered, and their thoughts after the project. 

Assessment:  Students will present their information from their research and post it to the digital mind map for the class.

Standards: Common Core - Modeling with Geometry G-MG Apply geometric concepts in modeling situations1. Use geometric shapes, their measures, and their properties to describe objects (e.g., modeling a tree trunk or a human torso as a cylinder).

Learning Objectives: After introducing the formulas for area of different geometrical shapes, students will be able to calculate areas of given counties and compare them to certain criteria.

Student Activity:
The students will be in groups of two as the are seated. Students will write down the formulas for finding the area of a square, triangle, circle, and rhombus as the teacher has written, as well as read, them on the board. They have been using these  formulas and know what each of the shapes are up to this point. The students will be given a map of a county with actual zip codes lines marked on the map. They will also be given a list of average household incomes of these zip codes. the population size, and the demographics. The students will be asked to find the area of each zip code using shapes that approximate the actual lines on the map as close as possible. Once the students have figured out the area, they will be required to compare that with the amount of people who live in the zip codes and compare that with average household income.

Assessment:

Students will be required to calculate the correct area of their maps using geometric methods to solve them. They will be given a score based on this outcome. They will receive partial credit for showing work but perhaps missing the answer. They will not be graded on their response to the open ended question posed above, but I will be reviewing them and sharing with them the most common responses the next day in class in order to really reinforce the ideas of prejudice in society which can stem from things like living in certain zip codes.

 
 Day 4
 
 Day 5
 
 Day 6

Content Standards: Common Core - Modeling with Geometry G-MG Apply geometric concepts in modeling situations 1. Use geometric shapes, their measures, and their properties to describe objects (e.g., modeling a tree trunk or a human torso as a cylinder).

Learning Objectives:

After investigating area maps and average household income, students will recognize the physical barriers that separate people based on income as well as learn to calculate area


Student Activity:

Students will continue as mentioned in day 3. At the end of class, 20 min prior, students will be asked to write a response to several prompts. These prompts being: What did you notice regarding the size of the zip codes compared to the population; compared to the average household income; compared to ethnicity living in those zip codes? Are there any stereotypes that you can think of which might be a result of these findings? If so, what are your thoughts about this? Is there anything that we as a society can or should do to eradicate any of these prejudices?



Assessment:

Students will be assessed for this assignment as in day 3. Students will be required to calculate the correct area of their maps using geometric methods to solve them. They will be given a score based on this outcome. They will receive partial credit for showing work but perhaps missing the answer. They will not be graded on their response to the open ended question posed above, but I will be reviewing them and sharing with them the most common responses the next day in class in order to really reinforce the ideas of prejudice in society which can stem from things like living in certain zip codes.

Content Standards: 1.2 Memorize and perform works of dance, demonstrating technical accuracy and consistent artistic intent. Creating, Performing, and Participating in Dance Creation/Invention of Dance Movement: 2.1 Create a diverse body of works of dance, each of which demonstrates originality, unity, clarity of intent, and a dynamic range of movement.  CA ELD standards: Listening and Speaking, Cluster 5, Level 1: Participate in social conversation with peers and adults on familiar topics by asking and answering questions and soliciting information.

Learning Objectives:  
After viewing the video on the Do-Re-Mi flash mob at Antwerp train station, students will be inspired by the video and want to learn more about the Flash Mob Unity Project.  After listening to the teachers from English, Biology and Math explain the intent, purpose and how-tos of the Flash Mob Unity Project, SWBAT get organized into groups based on tasks/responsibilities, elect a director for each group and communicate with their teammates about details for implementing the project.  After listening to the discussion about using a flash mob to communicate a message to the public, SWBAT feel excited and motivated about the project and look forward to the performance.  After getting into groups based on flash mob tasks, SWBAT participate in social conversation with peers and adults on familiar topics by asking and answering questions and soliciting information.

Student Activity:
Anticipatory Set/Into - Students watch video examples of flash mob events. (5 min) 
Instruction/Through - Students listen to co-teachers explain what components are required for a flash mob event including costumes, dance and music. (5 min)
Guided practice/Through - Students choose a group based on interest. Students meet with their groups and elect directors. Students communicate their ideas for implementing the project. (10 min)
Independent practice/Through - Students plan and organize tasks with teammates. (30 min)
Closure - Students take into consideration the two-week planning period and communicate with their teammates about how to stay organized and connected. (2 min) 
Beyond - Students sign up for groups and individual tasks.  Students will video tape their flashmob performance and share their video on social media sites. (3 min)

Assessment:
Diagnostic/Entry level - Co-teachers will informally check on students' preliminary knowledge of flash mobs after watching the videos, through informal discussions.
Formative/Progress monitoring - Co-teachers informally check for understanding while walking around the room while students are working together in their groups.
Summative - Students will be formally assessed based on participating in the planning, set-up and final performance.
Summative - Students will be formally assessed on the final video product
Summative - Students will be formally assessed on their on their one-page written reflection about the experience.
Content Standards:
 

CCSS.Math.Content.HSG-GMD.A.3 Use volume formulas for cylinders, pyramids, cones, and spheres to solve problems

Learning Objectives:

After applying formulas for volume, students will be able to find the approximate volume of different sized skulls.

Student Activity:

The students will be given worksheets with skull measurements and they will be asked to calculate the volume of these skulls using varying geometric formulas. Students will be given an article that talks about the size of a human skull and how that relates to intelligence levels and other traits. These perceived traits offer an avenue for students to discuss how stereotypes and prejudices have arisen because of these publications. The article can be found here:

http://psychology.about.com/od/historyofpsychology/f/phrenology.htm

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed based on the accuracy of their solution to finding the volumes of certain skulls. They will be assessed on how well they work with their partners.


Content Standards:

CCSS.Math.Content.HSG-GMD.A.3 Use volume formulas for cylinders, pyramids, cones, and spheres to solve problems

Learning Objectives:

After applying formulas for volume, students will be able to find the approximate volume of different sized skulls.

Student Activity:

The students will be given worksheets with skull measurements and they will be asked to calculate the volume of these skulls using varying geometric formulas. Students will be given an article that talks about the size of a human skull and how that relates to intelligence levels and other traits. These perceived traits offer an avenue for students to discuss how stereotypes and prejudices have arisen because of these publications. The article can be found here:

http://psychology.about.com/od/historyofpsychology/f/phrenology.htm

Assessment:

Students will be assessed based on the accuracy of their solution to finding the volumes of certain skulls. They will be assessed on how well they work with their partners.


 

 

 Day 7
 Day 8
 Day 9
Content Standards:  CCSS.Math.Content.HSG-MG.A.1 Use geometric shapes, their measures, and their properties to describe objects (e.g., modeling a tree trunk or a human torso as a cylinder

Learning Objectives:
Students will understand how to use geometric shapes to model various body parts.  Students will be able to draw a geometric model of themselves.

Student Activity:
Students are welcomed in and recall what was done the day before about analyzing various people using geometric shapes.   Students think about what shapes they can see in the human body and start creating a list as a class.  The students partner up and pass around tape measures.  Two students volunteer and come to the front of the room to model how to do measurements.  The students pick a shape to represent the torso, either a cylinder or a rectangular prism.  The students measure their back from shoulder to shoulder and write down the measurement.  The students then measure around their waist line and write that measurement down.  The students all reply to the teacher’s question about the measurements they have created.   The students now draw the shape they chose and records the measurements.  The students then proceed to measure their partner and draw out the shapes with measurements.   Students tape up their models and do a gallery-walk.  Students start looking for commonalities between each other and make a mental note of them.  Students have a class discussion about the oneness of mankind.


Assessment:  Students will be informally assessed based on their designs for their Geo-Mes.  Students will do a gallery walk and give individual peer feedback.

Content Standards:  CCSS.Math.Content.HSG-MG.A.1 Use geometric shapes, their measures, and their properties to describe objects (e.g., modeling a tree trunk or a human torso as a cylinder

Learning Objectives:  Students will understand how to scale a geometric model down and recreate it using various materials according to geometric measurements.

Student Activity:  Using the diagrams of the models from the previous day's lesson, students will be creating scales down models of themselves using various art forms.  Students will start by choosing their own scale for themselves.  Using the scale they have chosen, the students will start with making their torso along with the teacher.  The teacher will walk them through just to be sure that the students scale correctly.  The students will have access to markers, paint, colored pencils and will be required to add artistic design to their Geo-Mes.  The students must use at least 3 colors.  For the rest of the period the students will be working with their partners on their models and during the last 10 minutes the students will be taking two pictures.  First they will position their models on a table as a group for a group picture.  Then the students will move the desks and take a group picture of themselves in the same positions as the models.

 

Assessment:   Student models will be assessed based on their artistic expression, ability to scale accurately and proportional accuracy.  This will be an informal assessment.

Content Standards: CCSS.Math.Content.HSG-GMD.A.3 Use volume formulas for cylinders, pyramids, cones, and spheres to solve problems

Learning Objectives:

After finding the volumes of different skulls, students will be able to determine if size and/or shape of someone's skull contributes to their level of intelligence and/or personality traits.


Student Activity: Students will continue to work on the activity from day 5. After the volumes have been calculated the teacher will reveal to the students whose skull measurements they were calculating. Students will then be told that the measurements that they were given were from Einstein, an average female, the Pope, and other non-related people. They will then be asked to write their reaction to discovering whose skulls they were finding the volumes for. They will be asked to respond to the following prompts: How have you seen people be stereotyped based on their outward appearance? Does it seem fair that people were judged and categorized by the shape and size of their head? What can we do as individuals to ensure that we do not prejudge others based on their physical appearance?

Assessment:

Students will be assessed based on the accuracy of their solution to finding the volumes of certain skulls. They will be assessed on how well they work with their partners. Students will be assessed on whether or not they responded to the prompts with thoughtful consideration. They will not be graded according to their response. We will discuss common responses as a class.





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