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Phys Unit 1: Sig Figs and Motion (13 days)

Essential Questions

How do objects move?

How can I calculate motion?


Vocabulary

·      (Review) significant figures – a way of writing data that tells the reader how precise a measurement is

·      controlled experiment – an experiment in which only one variable is tested at a time

·      independent variable – the variable that the scientist changes

·      dependent variable – the variable that the scientist measures; it depends on changes in the independent variable

·      control variable – any variable that is kept constant throughout the experiment

·      (NOT for mastery) directly proportional – a mathematical relationship where two variables increase together or decrease together

·      (NOT for mastery) inversely proportional – a mathematical relationship where as one variable increases, the other decreases (and vice-versa)

·      scalar – a quantity with just a magnitude (number)

·      vector – quantity with both a magnitude and a direction

·      distance (d) – a scalar quantity that measures “how much ground has been covered”

·      displacement (d) – a vector quantity that states how far you are from your original starting point

·      (Review) meter (m) – the metric unit of length, distance, and displacement

·      speed (s) – a scalar quantity that measures how fast an object moves

·      velocity (v) – a vector quantity that measures the rate at which an object changes displacement/position

·      meters per second (m/s) – the metric unit of speed and velocity

·      acceleration (a) – a vector quantity that measures the rate at which an object changes velocity

·      meters per second squared (m/s2) – the metric unit of acceleration

·      delta (Δ) – a symbol used in science to mean “change in”

·      P-T graph – a graph that shows an object’s position as a function of time

·      V-T graph – a graph that shows an object’s velocity as a function of time

·      kinematic equations – a set of four equations that show the relationships between time, displacement, initial velocity, final velocity, and acceleration

·      acceleration of gravity (g) – the acceleration due to gravity at the surface of the earth; g = 9.8 m/s2

·      projectile motion – the motion that occurs when an object is released or launched in such a way that gravity is the only force acting on it

·      component vector – the x- or y- “legs” of a vector

·      resultant vector – the vector sum of two or more component vectors


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  Aug 18, 2012, 7:07 PM Emilie Siverling
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