7. TREASON and SEDITION

Why The Professional Organized Terrorist's are Guilty of Sedition

There are many things I do not like about what is taking place in this country, be it geo-politically, to social economic issues, but there has always been ONE GUIDING PRINCIPLE from which I abide.  It is called the Rule of Law and the United States Constitution. 


In order to have a GOVERNMENT - you first have the rules that dictate what that GOVERNMENT IS -

In the United States of American our Government has a clearly written document based on the Preamble to the Constitution, the fist ten Amendments called the Bill of Rights to the Constitution, and the Constitution itself.  From this point, this document lets the people know, you have three branches of the Government, the Executive, Judicial and Legislative Branches, in order to ensure separation of power.  It lets the people know what their duties are, how many of them there can be, how long their terms are, and then provides to the people basic Inalienable Rights and Liberties, which then mandates that the laws by which all People who reside within this country are to abide by.  Without this document, you have NO GOVERNMENT.

Therefore, if it is determined by a ROGUE Group of State and Corporate Sponsored Terrorist's to declare war on the rule of law that governs said Constitution, and to spit upon the very fabric of the Constitution by Waging War against their own citizens' by way of Targeting various, law abiding Individual's, and then denying, obstructing, and depriving that Targeted Citizen and Non Citizen alike of their fundamental and basic inalienable rights under the Rule and Color of Law.  

As such, these State and Corporate sponsored Rogues involved are then guilty of TREASON and SEDITION. 

Whereby, they believe they do not have to abide by said rules, or Constitution, but in an almost wild anarchy run around this country, and demand that others abide by their made up version of what they tell people the laws are, or what the Constitution stands for.     Hence, by denying ONE Targeted Individual of these basic rights and liberties, you DENY ALL... in the long run. 


By these Terrorist Architect's who declared WAR upon every aspect of the Targeted Individual's living life, by obstructing with illegally begotten information hence the Fruit of the Poisonous Tree Doctrine, through warrant-less wiretapping using cyber and telecommunications capabilities, illegal use of hidden without knowledge or consent, surveillance video, and audio, and then taking and exploiting prior information and poisoning and tainting the fruit of the poisonous tree - via prior presentation of exploited, fabricated, altered, and/or edited documents, papers, surveillance audios, and videos, then turning around, and presenting this illegally obtained information to any local, state, federal, non government, other agencies. or the citizen population itself in order to PREJUDICE all described against the Targeted individuals, is WAGING WAR, not just against their own people, but also against the very fabric of the Rule and Color of Law, that is dictated by the   United States Constitution. 

Thus, the Targeted Individual's loses their Constitutional rights to be judged in an equal, unbiased, and non-prejudicial manner, which has been and continues to be obstructed by tainting and poisoning illegally obtained information to begin with, in direct violation of said Targeted Individual's Constitutional Rights and Liberties.

Since the targeted individual resides within, abides by, in a lawful manner,

Therefore, by denying, depriving, and obstructing those Targeted Individual's from their fundamental and basic rights and liberties guaranteed TO ALL in the United States Constitution, and then Crusading to recruit other American's to assist in Denying, Depriving, and/or Obstructing Justice so that the Targeted Individual's was NOT allowed to obtain their due process, the Architect's from these State, Corporate, other Institutions and Citizen Organization Recruits have in FACT DECLARED WAR AGAINST THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION, which in turn means a DECLARATION OF WAR AGAINST THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT.

WITH EVERY DEPRIVATION, DENIAL, OBSTRUCTION OF EQUAL RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES THAT WERE AND HAVE AND CONTINUE TO BE - INFLICTED UPON THE LAW ABIDING, UNARMED, DEFENSELESS AMERICAN CITIZEN BY FELLOW AMERICAN CITIZENS - IT BECOME A DECLARATION OF CIVIL WAR.... 

Whereby the recruited citizens believe that they do not have to respect the same laws, or Constitution, and that they have the rights to violate, deprive, deny, and/or obstruct the Targeted Individuals - therefore - these Citizens have declared not only war against the United States Constitution, which equates to Secession - but also have declared civil war against those law abiding, American Citizens, and Non Citizens' alike who have been targeted by these SECESSIONISTS.

The only DIFFERENCE much of what is taking place in the premeditated denial, deprivation and obstruction of rights and liberties of the Targeted Individual, is coming from State and Corporate sponsorship, and funding.  

Therefore, by ALL who allowed these Architect's to EXPAND their TERRORIST OPERATIONS', they in fact CONTINUED TO DO DAMAGE TO THE RULE OF LAW AND THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION - FOR EVERY RIGHT AND LIBERTY DENIED - EACH AND EVERY SINGLE TARGETED INDIVIDUAL WHO CAME FORWARD TO ALL PROPER AUTHORITIES, AGENCIES, ATTORNEY'S - these INDIVIDUALS WITHIN - ALIGNED THEMSELVES with these TREASONOUS' TRAITOR'S - to the UNITED STATES - this type of sedition, is actually being conducted from the inside out, which means within the elements of Government, Corporations, and other entities - they believe that by DESTROYING THE CONSTITUTION - with it's rights and liberties, and freedoms and equality - they would in fact - then turn that Constitution into some type of FASCIST, TOTALITARIAN, AUTHORITARIAN REGIME.


TITLE 18 > PART I > CHAPTER 115 > § 2381
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§ 2381. Treason

Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.


The Following is the Definition of TREASON:
The betrayal of one's own country by waging war against it or by consciously or purposely acting to aid its enemies.

The Treason Clause traces its roots back to an English statute enacted during the reign of Edward III (1327–1377). This statute prohibited levying war against the king, adhering to his enemies, or contemplating his death. Although this law defined treason to include disloyal and subversive thoughts, it effectively circumscribed the crime as it existed under the Common Law. During the thirteenth century, the crime of treason encompassed virtually every act contrary to the king's will and became a political tool of the Crown. Building on the tradition begun by Edward III, the Founding Fathers carefully delineated the crime of treason in Article III of the U.S. Constitution, narrowly defining its elements and setting forth stringent evidentiary requirements.

Under Article III, Section 3, of the Constitution, any person who levies war against the United States or adheres to its enemies by giving them Aid and Comfort has committed treason within the meaning of the Constitution. The term aid and comfort refers to any act that manifests a betrayal of allegiance to the United States, such as furnishing enemies with arms, troops, transportation, shelter, or classified information. If a subversive act has any tendency to weaken the power of the United States to attack or resist its enemies, aid and comfort has been given.

The Treason Clause applies only to disloyal acts committed during times of war. Acts of dis-loyalty during peacetime are not considered treasonous under the Constitution. Nor do acts of Espionage committed on behalf of an ally constitute treason. For example, julius and ethel rosenberg were convicted of espionage, in 1951, for helping the Soviet Union steal atomic secrets from the United States during World War II. The Rosenbergs were not tried for treason because the United States and the Soviet Union were allies during World War II.

Under Article III a person can levy war against the United States without the use of arms, weapons, or military equipment. Persons who play only a peripheral role in a conspiracy to levy war are still considered traitors under the Constitution if an armed rebellion against the United States results. After the U.S. Civil War, for example, all Confederate soldiers were vulnerable to charges of treason, regardless of their role in the secession or insurrection of the Southern states. No treason charges were filed against these soldiers, however, because President Andrew Johnson issued a universal Amnesty.

The crime of treason requires a traitorous intent. If a person unwittingly or unintentionally gives aid and comfort to an enemy of the United States during wartime, treason has not occurred. Similarly, a person who pursues a course of action that is intended to benefit the United States but mistakenly helps an enemy is not guilty of treason. Inadvertent disloyalty is never punishable as treason, no matter how much damage the United States suffers.

As in any other criminal trial in the United States, a defendant charged with treason is presumed innocent until proved guilty Beyond a Reasonable Doubt. Treason may be proved by a voluntary confession in open court or by evidence that the defendant committed an Overt Act of treason. Each overt act must be witnessed by at least two people, or a conviction for treason will not stand. By requiring this type of direct evidence, the Constitution minimizes the danger of convicting an innocent person and forestalls the possibility of partisan witch-hunts waged by a single adversary.

Unexpressed seditious thoughts do not constitute treason, even if those thoughts contemplate a bloody revolution or coup. Nor does the public expression of subversive opinions, including vehement criticism of the government and its policies, constitute treason. The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees the right of all Americans to advocate the violent overthrow of their government unless such advocacy is directed toward inciting imminent lawless action and is likely to produce it (Brandenburg v. Ohio, 395 U.S. 444, 89 S. Ct. 1827, 23 L. Ed. 2d 430 [1969]). On the other hand, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the distribution of leaflets protesting the draft during World War I was not constitutionally protected speech (schenck v. united states, 249 U.S. 47, 39 S. Ct. 247, 63 L. Ed. 470 [1919]).

Because treason involves the betrayal of allegiance to the United States, a person need not be a U.S. citizen to commit treason under the Constitution. Persons who owe temporary allegiance to the United States can commit treason. Aliens who are domiciliaries of the United States, for example, can commit traitorous acts during the period of their domicile. A subversive act does not need to occur on U.S. soil to be punishable as treason. For example, Mildred Gillars, a U.S. citizen who became known as Axis Sally, was convicted of treason for broadcasting demoralizing propaganda to Allied forces in Europe from a Nazi radio station in Germany during World War II.

Treason is punishable by death. If a death sentence is not imposed, defendants face a minimum penalty of five years in prison and a $10,000 fine (18 U.S.C.A. § 2381). A person who is convicted of treason may not hold federal office at any time thereafter.

The English common law required defendants to forfeit all of their property, real and personal, upon conviction for treason. In some cases, the British Crown confiscated the property of immediate family members as well. The common law also precluded convicted traitors from bequeathing their property through a will. Relatives were presumed to be tainted by the blood of the traitor and were not permitted to inherit from him. Article III of the U.S. Constitution outlaws such "corruption of the blood" and limits the penalty of Forfeiture to "the life of the person attainted." Under this provision relatives cannot be made to forfeit their property or inheritance for


sedition

A revolt or an incitement to revolt against established authority, usually in the form of Treason or Defamation against government.

Sedition is the crime of revolting or inciting revolt against government. However, because of the broad protection of free speech under the First Amendment, prosecutions for sedition are rare. Nevertheless, sedition remains a crime in the United States under 18 U.S.C.A. § 2384 (2000), a federal statute that punishes seditious conspiracy, and 18 U.S.C.A. § 2385 (2000), which outlaws advocating the overthrow of the federal government by force. Generally, a person may be punished for sedition only when he or she makes statements that create a Clear and Present Danger to rights that the government may lawfully protect (schenck v. united states, 249 U.S. 47, 39 S. Ct. 247, 63 L. Ed. 470 [1919]).

The crime of seditious conspiracy is committed when two or more persons in any state or U.S. territory conspire to levy war against the U.S. government. A person commits the crime of advocating the violent overthrow of the federal government when she willfully advocates or teaches the overthrow of the government by force, publishes material that advocates the overthrow of the government by force, or organizes persons to overthrow the government by force. A person found guilty of seditious conspiracy or advocating the overthrow of the government may be fined and sentenced to up to 20 years in prison. States also maintain laws that punish similar advocacy and conspiracy against the state government.

Governments have made sedition illegal since time immemorial. The precise acts that constitute sedition have varied. In the United States, Congress in the late eighteenth century believed that government should be protected from "false, scandalous and malicious" criticisms. Toward this end, Congress passed the Sedition Act of 1798, which authorized the criminal prosecution of persons who wrote or spoke falsehoods about the government, Congress, the president, or the vice president. The act was to expire with the term of President John Adams.

The Sedition Act failed miserably. Thomas Jefferson opposed the act, and after he was narrowly elected president in 1800, public opposition to the act grew. The act expired in 1801, but not before it was used by President Adams to prosecute numerous public supporters of Jefferson, his challenger in the presidential election of 1800. One writer, Matthew Lyon, a congressman from Vermont, was found guilty of seditious libel for stating, in part, that he would not be the "humble advocate" of the Adams administration when he saw "every consideration of the public welfare swallowed up in a continual grasp for power, in an unbounded thirst for ridiculous pomp, foolish adulation, and selfish avarice" (Lyon's Case, 15 F. Cas. 1183 [D. Vermont 1798] [No. 8646]). Vermont voters reelected Lyon while he was in jail. Jefferson, after winning the election and assuming office, pardoned all persons convicted under the act.

In the 1820s and 1830s, as the movement to abolish Slavery grew in size and force in the South, Southern states began to enact seditious libel laws. Most of these laws were used to prosecute persons critical of slavery, and they were abolished after the Civil War. The federal government was no less defensive; Congress enacted seditious conspiracy laws before the Civil War aimed at persons advocating secession from the United States. These laws were the precursors to the present-day federal seditious conspiracy statutes.

In the late nineteenth century, Congress and the states began to enact new limits on speech, most notably statutes prohibiting Obscenity. At the outset of World War I, Congress passed legislation designed to suppress antiwar speech. The Espionage Act of 1917 (ch. 30, tit. 1, § 3, 40 Stat. 219), as amended by ch. 75, § 1, 40 Stat 553, put a number of pacifists into prison. Socialist leader eugene v. debs was convicted for making an antiwar speech in Canton, Ohio (Debs v. United States, 249 U.S. 211, 39 S. Ct. 252, 63 L. Ed. 566 [1919]). Charles T. Schenck and Elizabeth Baer were convicted for circulating to military recruits a leaflet that advocated opposition to the draft and suggested that the draft violated the Thirteenth Amendment's ban on Involuntary Servitude (Schenck v. United States, 249 U.S. 47, 39 S. Ct. 247, 63 L. Ed. 470 [1919]).

The U.S. Supreme Court did little to protect the right to criticize the government until after 1927. That year, Justice louis d. brandeis wrote an influential concurring opinion in Whitney v. California, 274 U.S. 357, 47 S. Ct. 641, 71 L. Ed. 1095 (1927), that was to guide First Amendment Jurisprudence for years to come. In Whitney the High Court upheld the convictions of political activists for violation of federal anti-syndicalism laws, or laws that prohibit the teaching of crime. In his concurring opinion, Brandeis maintained that even if a person advocates violation of the law, "it is not a justification for denying free speech where the advocacy falls short of incitement and there is nothing to indicate that the advocacy would be immediately acted on." Beginning in the 1930s, the Court became more protective of political free speech rights.

The High Court has protected the speech of racial supremacists and separatists, labor organizers, advocates of racial Integration, and opponents of the draft for the Vietnam War. However, it has refused to declare unconstitutional all sedition statutes and prosecutions. In 1940, to silence radicals and quell Nazi or communist subversion during the burgeoning Second World War, Congress enacted the Smith Act (18 U.S.C.A. §§ 2385, 2387), which outlawed sedition and seditious conspiracy. The Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the act in Dennis v. United States, 341 U.S. 494, 71 S. Ct. 857, 95 L. Ed. 1137 (1951).

Sedition prosecutions are extremely rare, but they do occur. Shortly after the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center in New York City, the federal government prosecuted Sheik Omar Abdel Rahman, a blind Egyptian cleric living in New Jersey, and nine codefendants on charges of seditious conspiracy. Rahman and the other defendants were convicted of violating the seditious conspiracy statute by engaging in an extensive plot to wage a war of Terrorism against the United States. With the exception of Rahman, they all were arrested while mixing explosives in a garage in Queens, New York, on June 24, 1993.

The defendants committed no overt acts of war, but all were found to have taken substantial steps toward carrying out a plot to levy war against the United States. The government did not have sufficient evidence that Rahman par ticipated in the actual plotting against the government or any other activities to prepare for terrorism. He was instead prosecuted for pro viding religious encouragement to his cocon spirators. Rahman argued that he only performed the function of a cleric and advised followers about the rules of Islam. He and the others were convicted, and on January 17, 1996, Rahman was sentenced to life imprisonment by Judge Michael Mukasey.

Following the September 11th Attacks of 2001, the federal government feared that terrorist networks were very real threats, and that if left unchecked, would lead to further insurrection. As a result, Congress enacted the Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act (USA PATRIOT) Act of 2001, Pub. L. No. 107-56, 115 Stat. 272. Among other things, the act increases the president's authority to seize the property of individuals and organizations that the president determines have planned, authorized, aided, or engaged in hostilities or attacks against the United States.

The events of September 11 also led to the conviction of at least one American. In 2001, U.S. officials captured John Philip Walker Lindh, a U.S. citizen who had trained with terrorist organizations in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Lindh, who became known as the "American Taliban," was indicted on ten counts, including conspiracy to murder U.S. nationals. In October 2002, he was sentenced to 20 years in prison.



crimes committed by traitorous family members.

SEDITION CONSPIRACY TITLE 18 USCA 2384

If two or more persons in any State or Territory, or in any place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, conspire to overthrow, put down, or to destroy by force the Government of the United States, or to levy war against them, or to oppose by force the authority thereof, or by force to prevent, hinder, or delay the execution of any law of the United States, or by force to seize, take, or possess any property of the United States contrary to the authority thereof, they shall each be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than twenty years, or both.

18 U.S.C. § 2385 : US Code - Section 2385: Advocating overthrow of Government


Whoever knowingly or willfully advocates, abets, advises, or
teaches the duty, necessity, desirability, or propriety of
overthrowing or destroying the government of the United States or
the government of any State, Territory, District or Possession
thereof, or the government of any political subdivision therein, by
force or violence, or by the assassination of any officer of any
such government; or
Whoever, with intent to cause the overthrow or destruction of any
such government, prints, publishes, edits, issues, circulates,
sells, distributes, or publicly displays any written or printed
matter advocating, advising, or teaching the duty, necessity,
desirability, or propriety of overthrowing or destroying any
government in the United States by force or violence, or attempts
to do so; or
Whoever organizes or helps or attempts to organize any society,
group, or assembly of persons who teach, advocate, or encourage the
overthrow or destruction of any such government by force or
violence; or becomes or is a member of, or affiliates with, any
such society, group, or assembly of persons, knowing the purposes
thereof -
Shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than
twenty years, or both, and shall be ineligible for employment by
the United States or any department or agency thereof, for the five
years next following his conviction.
If two or more persons conspire to commit any offense named in
this section, each shall be fined under this title or imprisoned
not more than twenty years, or both, and shall be ineligible for
employment by the United States or any department or agency
thereof, for the five years next following his conviction.
As used in this section, the terms "organizes" and "organize",
with respect to any society, group, or assembly of persons, include
the recruiting of new members, the forming of new units, and the
regrouping or expansion of existing clubs, classes, and other units
of such society, group, or assembly of persons.

TRAITOR, crimes. One guilty of treason.

     2. The punishment of a traitor is death.

A person who is guilty of treason is known as a traitor. Treason is punishable by death if a traitor levies war against his state or country or supports its enemies, giving them aid and comfort. A traitor shall be convicted on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in an open court.


The 14 CHARACTERISTICS OF FASCISM