mind control

Walter Bowart on what MK-Ultra victims taught him: “Look at the DSM-IV is strongly influenced by the insurance companies and people having no experience in the richness of the human mind and spirit. That’s one of the things that the MK-Ultra victims taught me. Over and over I heard the phrase, “They didn’t mess with my mind; they messed with my soul.” I’ve begun to think in spiritual terms of what has gone on here. This is a horrible thing. [It is] just like the Inquisition, but more sophisticated and less visible. There’s no blood on the streets, but that makes it even more insidious. And of course the technology is now available to everyone…”

Mind control (also known as brainwashing, coercive persuasion, mind abuse, thought control, or thought reform) refers to a process in which a group or individual “systematically uses unethically manipulative methods to persuade others to conform to the wishes of the manipulator(s), often to the detriment of the person being manipulated”. The term has been applied to any tactic, psychological or otherwise, which can be seen as subverting an individual’s sense of control over their own thinking, behavior, emotions or decision making. Theories of brainwashing and of mind control were originally developed to explain how totalitarian regimes appeared to succeed in systematically indoctrinating prisoners of war through propaganda and torture techniques. These theories were later expanded and modified, by psychologists including Margaret Singer, to explain a wider range of phenomena, especially conversions to new religious movements (NRMs). A third-generation theory proposed by Ben Zablocki focused on the utilization of mind control to retain members of NRMs and cults to convert them to a new religion. The suggestion that NRMs use mind control techniques has resulted in scientific and legal controversy (Wikipedia).

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