R.S.Bisht

Reference ----- For the entire list of work --- follow the link ----
https://sites.google.com/site/rsbishtindusvalley/photo-gallery



BOOK AND BOOKLETS PREPARED (PUBLISHED)

1.Marg: Haryana Heritage, vol. XXVII, No.4, September, 1974, wrote all the text (in collaboration with Dr. Mulk Raj Anand).

2. Banawali: A booklet published by Director, Public Relations Department, Government of Haryana, Chandigarh, 1976.

3.Banawali: A look back into the Pre-Indus and Indus Civilization Special Board of Archaeology, Govt. of Haryana, Chandigarh, 1977.

4.India and Indus civilization, jointly with J. P. Joshi, published by National Museums Institute (deemed university). 1994.



Did Aryans kill IVC people or a Economic depression lead to their decline?

Reference ------

http://www.cycleoftime.com/articles_view.php?codArtigo=51

                             When the British archaeologist Wheeler  discovered a dozen skeletons in Mohenjodaro, he propounded a theory about the final massacre by marauding invaders that put an end to the Indus civilisation. When an Indian scholar told him of Hariyuppa being mentioned in the Rigveda, he took it to mean Harappa. And since a fort was known as pur, and Indira, the Aryan god, was known as Purandhara or destroyer of forts, it all fitted neatly.  Yet the past 50 years, and more so the last decade, has shown just how wrong Wheeler was. The last massacre theory was his imagination running riot. Far from being snuffed out, there was a brilliant resurgence of Indus culture further south for a while. In India the sites in Haryana, Punjab and Rajasthan increased from 218 to 853. Possehl asks: "How can this be construed as an eclipse? We are looking at a highly mobile people." 

                     Allchin argues that there is clear indication that the rainfall pattern, which had initially brought fertility, had become adverse in the Sindh region. And theorises that, given the instability of the Himalayan region, there may have been a massive earthquake that possibly changed the course of rivers such as the Sarasvati and affected many Indus cities. The Indus people then migrated eastward. Lal talks of steep decline in trade because of problems in Sumer that resulted in a Great Depression and turned many urban centres into ghost cities.

                         Bisht concurs with Lal but goes a step further. He says that after the quake hit the heart of the civilisation, the Indus people migrated east which acted like a sort of bypass to their woes. And like a dying candle, it shone brilliantly again but briefly before being snuffed out. Dholavira, Banawali, Mehrgarh, Harappa -- in fact, all the major cities show that as the cities declined, encroachments on streets that were unseen at its peak began to occur with alarming regularity. There was a breakdown in sanitation and cities like their modern-day counterparts in India simply ran themselves aground. They were replaced by massive squatter colonies and an explosion of rural sites as people, disillusioned with cities, went back to farming communities, a giant step backward. 

                      Some of the writings survived in the pottery of the following ages. The weight and decimal system too lived on. And so did the bullock-cart technology that the Indus had perfected. Rather than a violent transition, there may have been an orderly interaction with oncoming Aryans. Lal in his most recent book even puts across the most audacious theory: Could the Bronze Age Harappans be Aryans themselves? He says this because of the presence of fire worship and the discovery of horse remains and idols in Indus sites. Meadows dismisses it as premature and points out that it was more likely that ass remains were mistaken for that of a horse's. And that the Vedas showed a great antipathy for urban centres.


Comments