Chromosomes

In the nucleus of each cell, the DNA molecule is packaged into thread-like structures called chromosomes. Each chromosome is made up of DNA tightly coiled many times around proteins called histones that support its structure. Chromosomes are not visible in the cell’s nucleus—not even under a microscope—when the cell is not dividing. However, the DNA that makes up chromosomes becomes more tightly packed during cell division and is then visible under a microscope. Most of what researchers know about chromosomes was learned by observing chromosomes during cell division.

Source: http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/chromosomes





 
How many chromosomes do people have?
In humans, each cell normally contains 23 pairs of chromosomes, for a total of 46. Twenty-two of these pairs, called autosomes, look the same in both males and females. The 23rd pair, the sex chromosomes, differ between males and females. Females have two copies of the X chromosome, while males have one X and one Y chromosome.




The 22 autosomes are numbered by size. The other two chromosomes, X and Y, are the sex chromosomes.  This picture of the human chromosomes lined up in pairs is called a karyotype.




Watch this video to learn more about chromosomes.

YouTube Video

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