Site owners

  • Mark Ericson
  • sf12 pueb
  • mericson

Water Conservation Success

NameDate EstablishedLocation DescriptionReason for Success Contact Information
Clemson Beaver Pond Leveler  March 1994 Clemson, South   Carolina The Clemson Beaver Pond Leveler is a device that was placed in the center of a pond create naturally by beaver dams. They inserted a device through the beaver dam that would slowly drain water out of the pond at the same rate that water enters. The water is then released further downstream which allows the stream or river to continue running even with the beaver dam.   Utilized natural made ponds to their advantage Dr. Gee E. Wood, Mr. Larry A. Woodward, and Dr Greg Yarrow Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Wildlife, Clemson University, Clemson,
 South Carolina, 29634  
 
Tel: (803) 656-3117
 Sustainable Santa Fe Plan  October 2008 Santa Fe, New Mexico The Sustainable Santa Fe Plan, created in 2008, outlined 12 steps towards water conservation for the city. This document is a public document and intended to be a living document in which it is annually updated. Section 8 on water conservation outlines various steps that Santa Fe has made so far and future tasks to be accomplished in the process of making a water conscious and conserving city.  
 
Santa Fe has done a great job at making this public knowledge and promoting the concept of saving water. The city is leading by example.  City of Santa Fe, Sustainable Santa Fe Commission 
 
 Arizona Water Meter  October 2010 Arizona The Arizona Water Meter Report outlines the state criteria for each program offered throughout the state within various communities. It outlines each of these programs and how they incorporate education within each one. The report also outlines the Arizona State incentives of which may be similar or inspire new incentives within New Mexico.  
 
They've done an excellent job recording and reporting their success for 15 water conservation programs. They've promoted educating consumers as well as making changes.  
 
Western Resource Advocates, 2260 Baseline Road, Suite 200, Boulder, CO 80302   
Tel: (303) 444-1188
The Sustainable Use of Water in the Lower Colorado River Basin
November 1996
Lower Colorado River Basin
 This 18 page case study covers concepts and criteria for sustainable water usage in the Colorado River basin. These are then used to determine water use patterns and water allocation and management making it sound and sustainable. The findings provide information on sustainable river basin management that can be applied in the southwest and other regions.
Highlights the unsustainable patterns of water use while providing demonstrations of improvement through technology public policy, and management strategies.
Pacific Institute for Studies in Development, Environment, and Security
1204 Preservation Park Way
Oakland, California 94612
Tel:  (510) 251-1600
Email: pistaff@pacinst.org

Funding Mississippi River Swells 
 
2009
The Mississippi   River from Minnesota to Gulf of Mexico 
 
This project worked towards improving water quality in 40 watersheds from Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico. Farmers and landowners were offered the chance to volunteer and participate in the programs designed by the government. The participants saw many benefits in these programs such as redevelopment of wet lands and a decrease in nutrient wastes.  

Farmers volunteered to participate and they received government funding.
Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)-USDA 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Room 5105-A Washington, District of Columbia 20250 USA
 Using Shock Wells to Recharge the Water Table

 February 2012
Gurgaon, India
Gurgaon city is completely dependent on  ground water after digging shock wells in parks and near local residences and community buildings.  The wells collect the rain water run-off and assist in recharging the water table. They are also in the process of implementing tubewells.

Implemented public policy to make sure that all building from now on have 100 m roof allowing the greatest possible rain water to be harvested.

N/A
Millers Creek Rainwater Project
Use Porous Pavement
 On Going
Michigan
Permeable Pavement allows rainwater to soak into the ground recharging the water table instead of running off and into the nearest deposit location. It assists in decreasing erosion, replenishing groundwater, prevents snow and ice build up, along with many other benefits to the user.
They often have a longer lifespan the normal pavement and are inexpensive than other options.
Pam Labadie
Marketing Director
Huron River Watershed Council
NEW Center
1100 North Main Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Tel:
(734) 769-5123 x 602
Email:
plabadie@hrwc.org

Millers Creek Rainwater Project
 Land Scape with Native Plants
On Going
 MichiganNative roots help capture rainwater on site. Its simple to create low maintenance borders around your gardens, which gives it stability and decreases erosion. It also provides link to pages to explain native plants.
Native plants, no matter where the location is, will always use less water than non-native species. They also have the ability to  retain water and access it in drought. Did we mention its inexpensive!
Pam Labadie
Marketing Director
Huron River Watershed Council
NEW Center
1100 North Main Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Tel:
(734) 769-5123 x 602
Email:
plabadie@hrwc.org

Rain Water Harvesting for Landscape Use
On GoingArizona 
Through collecting rain water the dependence on ground water, cost of municipal water bills, flooding, and erosion are all reduced.  This resource allows a user to learn about homemade options as well as well as professional options that can be implemented.
 Collecting rainwater for irrigation has agricultural benefits as well as cost effective benefits.
 Pam Labadie
Marketing Director
Huron River Watershed Council
NEW Center
1100 North Main Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
 Tel:
(734) 769-5123 x 602
Email:
plabadie@hrwc.org
Tribal Connections
On Going
 The NRCS Partnership with Native American Tribes in Washington aid landowners and operators within Native American and Native Alaskan tribal communities.
 They provide technical assistance as well as funding. They also hold forums for tribal members to attend and address issues.
Robin Slate
NRCS Tribal Liaison
Natural Resources Conservation Service
1835 Black Lake Blvd. SW, Suite D
Olympia, WA  98512-5607
   Tel :  360.704.7780
Email:  robin.slate@wa.usda.gov